29

This is the way it currently works, and it's the Maven Deploy Plugin Usage

pom.xml

[...]
  <distributionManagement>
    <repository>
      <id>internal.repo</id>
      <name>MyCo Internal Repository</name>
      <url>Host to Company Repository</url>
    </repository>
  </distributionManagement>
[...]

settings.xml

[...]
    <server>
      <id>internal.repo</id>
      <username>someUser</username>
      <password>somePassword</password>
    </server>
[...]

and what I'm trying to achieve is finding a way in which the username and password are typed in at the command line. to achieve mvn deploy -someUser -somePassword

29

The settings.xml is considered personal, so for that reason the username+password are stored in the (user-)settings.xml. So in general there's no reason to pass them as argument. (btw, passwords can be stored encrypted here) The maven-deploy-plugin has no option to pass them via commandline. However, I've seen hacks like:

<username>${internal.repo.username}</username>

And now you can do -Dinternal.repo.username=someUser

  • 4
    I don't know if I'd call that a hack, a core feature of Maven is to allow variable substitution – Alex Jan 21 '15 at 19:04
  • It was something I was trying to prevent but it does get the job done. – stef52 Jan 23 '15 at 15:12
  • About <username>${internal.repo.username}</username>: do you mean adding it to settings.xml or pom.xml? – Daniel Aug 3 '16 at 20:35
  • I think variable substitution is not possible for settings.xml so I think you are referring to pom.xml – Daniel Aug 3 '16 at 20:36
  • 1
    I'm talking about the settings.xml – Robert Scholte Aug 3 '16 at 20:51
6

I'll lay out here the full solution, but basically Robert Scholte's solution works brilliant.

In your ~/.m2/settings.xml you should have the following

<settings>
    <servers>
        <server>
            <id>internal.repo</id>
            <username>${repo.login}</username>
            <password>${repo.pwd}</password>
        </server>
    </servers>
</settings>  

and then you just

mvn -Drepo.login=someUser -Drepo.pwd=SomePassword clean install

You can even use your environment variable (if you are doing that on the remote server/container, for example):

mvn -Drepo.login=$REPO_LOGIN -Drepo.pwd=$REPO_PWD clean install

  • Thanks! I'm using bitbucket pipelines with a publicly available Docker file to provide build environment, so I want to avoid hardcoding the user name and password into the settings.xml file. The proposed solution above should work great. – aloraine Sep 3 '19 at 21:07
  • A followup: Can I also parameterize the repo id, e.g, <id>$id</id> (inside settings.xml)? – aloraine Sep 18 '19 at 1:57
  • Answer is "yes" -- repository identifier can also be a parameter. – aloraine Sep 19 '19 at 10:17
1

This also works:

<server>
  <id>${repo.id}</id>
  <username>${repo.username}</username>
  <password>${repo.password}</password>
</server>

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