26

In this code:

function Cls() {
    this._id = 0;
    Object.defineProperty(this, 'id', {
        get: function() {
            return this._id;
        },
        set: function(id) {
            this._id = id;
        },
        enumerable: true
    });
};
var obj = new Cls();
obj.id = 123;
console.log(obj);
console.log(obj.id);

I would like to get { _id: 123, id: 123 } but instead I get { _id: 123, id: [Getter/Setter] }

Is there a way to have the getter value be used by the console.log function?

5
  • 1
    If you click on the output of [getter] in the console, it should be executed and evolve into the value.
    – Bergi
    Jan 21, 2015 at 16:57
  • @Bergi, it looks like the code is executed in node.js since its tagged, OP wouldnt be able to click on it. Jan 21, 2015 at 17:01
  • @PatrickEvans: Ooops, of course. Not sure whether util.inspect would be of some help?
    – Bergi
    Jan 21, 2015 at 17:10
  • I know how to get to the value, what I don't know is how to design a class or library so it's transparent to the user of that lib. I don't want it to appear any other way then a clean value.
    – Killroy
    Jan 22, 2015 at 17:51
  • Would perhaps valueOf() of toString() be useful? I'd also like soem help on the browser side. I currently get three items, the getter, the setter, and a linked ... value that, when clicked returns the correct item. Needless to say, that really spams up my console output!
    – Killroy
    Feb 19, 2015 at 15:29

8 Answers 8

14

You can use console.log(Object.assign({}, obj));

2
  • 6
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. Jun 20, 2017 at 4:37
  • 2
    The Object.assign function calls getters internally and returns a POJO (with some caveats). From MDN: Object.assign: "The Object.assign() method only copies enumerable and own properties from a source object to a target object. It uses [[Get]] on the source and [[Set]] on the target, so it will invoke getters and setters. Therefore it assigns properties, versus copying or defining new properties."
    – Killroy
    Aug 24, 2020 at 8:23
11

Use console.log(JSON.stringify(obj));

3
  • that works except for methods and recursive refs, any suggestions for those objects?
    – dandavis
    Jan 21, 2015 at 17:23
  • I don't need to know how to print the value some other way. After all console.log(obj.id) does just that. I need to figure out how to have the console.log behave the same on a getter/setter property as on a primitive value.
    – Killroy
    Jan 22, 2015 at 17:52
  • There isn't a one-size-fits-all solution here but using JSON.stringify and adding a toJSON method to your objects seems like the best solution: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… -- You could also automate toJSON with some reflection and Object.defineProperty( ... { value: }) Nov 16, 2015 at 20:09
5

Since Nodejs v11.5.0 you can set getters: true in the util.inspect options. See here for docs.

getters <boolean> | <string> If set to true, getters are inspected. If set to 'get', only getters without a corresponding setter are inspected. If set to 'set', only getters with a corresponding setter are inspected. This might cause side effects depending on the getter function. Default: false.

2
  • Good info, thanks. But doesn't help with the original premise to stay compatible with the console.* api.
    – Killroy
    Aug 24, 2020 at 8:13
  • 1
    @Killroy configure console.* output in the default inspect preferences
    – Lloyd
    Aug 25, 2020 at 9:08
4

You can define an inspect method on your object, and export the properties you are interested in. See docs here: https://nodejs.org/api/util.html#util_custom_inspection_functions_on_objects

I guess it would look something like:

function Cls() {
    this._id = 0;
    Object.defineProperty(this, 'id', {
        get: function() {
            return this._id;
        },
        set: function(id) {
            this._id = id;
        },
        enumerable: true
    });
};

Cls.prototype.inspect = function(depth, options) {
    return `{ 'id': ${this._id} }`
}

var obj = new Cls();
obj.id = 123;
console.log(obj);
console.log(obj.id);
2
  • Does this work for console.log() ? The docs only mention utils.inspect. Ideally I am looking for something that's transparent to the user. If the user has to do something other then plain console.log(), they might as well just inspect the getter manually anyway.
    – Killroy
    Apr 12, 2017 at 21:58
  • 1
    Yeah, console.log calls util.inspect: nodejs.org/api/console.html#console_console_log_data_args
    – Ryan Quinn
    Apr 14, 2017 at 20:56
4

I needed a pretty printed object without the getters and setters yet plain JSON produced garbage. For me as the JSON string was just too long after feeding JSON.stringify() a particularly big and nested object. I wanted it to look like and behave like a plain stringified object in the console. So I just parsed it again:

JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(largeObject))

There. If you have a simpler method, let me know.

2
  • 1
    Would this be similar (but less efficient) to Object.assign({}, largeObject}) ?
    – Killroy
    Aug 24, 2020 at 8:11
  • This is the only one that works with a Vue object that has getters and setters also on the properties inside the object in arrays. The accepted answer only works with the outer object not it's inner array.
    – JohnC
    Jun 3, 2021 at 22:04
1

In my particular use-case I couldn't import the native inspect module, and I also couldn't do JSON.stringify on my logged object because there were circular references within it. But, I found that you can pass all of the inspect options as the second argument to console.dir(obj, options). Thus, the following worked for me:

console.dir(myObj, { getters: true });
1

On Node.js, I suggest using util.inspect.custom, which will allow you to pretty print getters as values, while keeping other properties output unchanged.

It will apply to your specific object only and won't mess the general console.log output.

The main benefit vs Object.assign is that it happens on your object, so you keep the regular generic console.log(object) syntax. You don't have to wrap it with console.log(Object.assign({}, object)).

Add the following method to your object:

[util.inspect.custom](depth, options) {
    const getters = Object.keys(this);
    /*
        for getters set on prototype, use instead:
        const prototype = Object.getPrototypeOf(this);
        const getters = Object.keys(prototype);
    */
    const properties = getters.map((getter) => [getter, this[getter]]);
    const defined = properties.filter(([, value]) => value !== undefined);
    const plain = Object.fromEntries(defined);
    const object = Object.create(this, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors(plain));
    // disable custom after the object has been processed once to avoid infinite looping
    Object.defineProperty(object, util.inspect.custom, {});
    return util.inspect(object, {
        ...options,
        depth: options.depth === null ? null : options.depth - 1,
    });
}

Here is a working example in your context:

const util = require('util');

function Cls() {
    this._id = 0;
    Object.defineProperty(this, 'id', {
        get: function() {
            return this._id;
        },
        set: function(id) {
            this._id = id;
        },
        enumerable: true
    });
    this[util.inspect.custom] = function(depth, options) {
    const getters = Object.keys(this);
    /*
        for getters set on prototype, use instead:
        const prototype = Object.getPrototypeOf(this);
        const getters = Object.keys(prototype);
    */
    const properties = getters.map((getter) => [getter, this[getter]]);
    const defined = properties.filter(([, value]) => value !== undefined);
    const plain = Object.fromEntries(defined);
    const object = Object.create(this, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors(plain));
    // disable custom after the object has been processed once to avoid infinite looping
    Object.defineProperty(object, util.inspect.custom, {});
    return util.inspect(object, {
        ...options,
        depth: options.depth === null ? null : options.depth - 1,
    });
}
};
var obj = new Cls();
obj.id = 123;
console.log(obj);
console.log(obj.id);

Output:

Cls { _id: 123, id: 123 }
123
0

Use spread operator:

console.log({ ... obj });

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