8

I'm looking for a lambda to refine the data already retrieved. I have a raw resultset, if the user do not change the date I want use java's lambda to group by the results for then. And I'm new to lambdas with java.

The lambda I'm looking for works simliar to this query.

select z, w, min(x), max(x), avg(x), min(y), max(y), avg(y) from table group by x, w;
9
  • 1
    Is this purely a question about doing this with Java 8 and lambdas, or would any solution that can achieve this in-memory grouping of a JDBC (?) ResultSet work for you?
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 21 '15 at 19:29
  • 1
    Lukas, the ideia is use only Java and Lambdas, after the database return the resultset de object in question is in cache and the user can change the report format without wait another resultset and things like that. Jan 21 '15 at 23:25
  • 2
    That doesn’t make sense. If you say group by x, w you are not grouping “simultaneously” you are just grouping once using the tuple (x, w) as a key. Within each group, all entries will have the same values for (x, w), therefore min(x), max(x), avg(x) will evaluate to x, x, x for each group. And by the way, if you want such an aggregate database operation, it’s much more efficient to let the database perform the operation rather than fetching the entire table and aggregate manually.
    – Holger
    Jan 22 '15 at 9:12
  • 2
    @HugoPrudente: While this is still an interesting question from a pure Java 8 perspective, are you sure your database cannot maintain data in its buffer cache? Chances are that server-side aggregation still outperforms any "optimisation" you attempt to do in Java, specifically because it will be much harder to implement some of the more sophisticated aggregation that you might need down the line...
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 23 '15 at 12:02
  • 1
    @Holger: I'd assume a typo. The query should read group by z, w. In all other cases, it's invalid SQL anyway (except for MySQL in non-strict mode)
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 23 '15 at 12:03
8

So I'm assuming you have a List of objects and you want to create a map with the given groupings. I am a bit confused by your x, y, w, z so I'll use my own fields. But Here's how I would do it:

interface Entry {
    String getGroup1();
    String getGroup2();
    int getIntData();
    double getDoubleData();
}

List<Entry> dataList;
Map<String, Map<String, IntSummaryStatistics>> groupedStats = 
    dataList.stream()
        .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Entry::getGroup1,
            Collectors.groupingBy(Entry::getGroup2,
                Collectors.summarizingInt(Entry::getIntData))));

Then if you want to get, say, the average of data for items with groups A, B then you use:

groupedStats.get("A").get("B").getAverage();

If you want to summarise more than one set of data simultaneously then it gets a bit more complicated. You need to write your own wrapper class that can accumulate multiple statistics. Here's an example with both data items in Entry (I made them an int and a double to make it a bit more interesting).

class CompoundStats {
    private final IntSummaryStatistics intDataStats = new IntSummaryStatistics();
    private final DoubleSummaryStatistics doubleDataStats = new DoubleSummaryStatistics();

    public void add(Entry entry) {
        intDataStats.accept(entry.getIntData());
        doubleDataStats.accept(entry.getDoubleData());
    }

    public CompoundStats combine(CompoundStats other) {
        intDataStats.combine(other.intDataStats);
        doubleDataStats.combine(other.doubleDataStats);
        return this;
    }
}

This class can then be used to create your own collector:

Map<String, Map<String, CompoundStats>> groupedStats = 
    dataList.stream()
        .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Entry::getGroup1,
            Collectors.groupingBy(Entry::getGroup2,
                Collector.of(CompoundStats::new, CompoundStats::add, CompoundStats::combine))));

Now your maps return a CompoundStats instead of an IntSummaryStatistics:

groupedStats.get("A").get("B").getDoubleStats().getAverage();

Also note that this would be neater if you created a separate class to hold your groupings rather than using the two step map I've proposed above. Again not a difficult modification if required.

Hopefully this is useful in your own case.

5
  • 1
    But the question title reads how to aggregate X and Y simultaneously (the OP wrote "how to group by", but I'm sure they meant "how to aggregate"). I like your simple solution, but can you think of a way of combining two IntSummaryStatistics in one go?
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 22 '15 at 8:29
  • 1
    @LukasEder no probs - you need a separate collector for that which makes the code a bit more complicated but I'll add it to the answer in case you're interested.
    – sprinter
    Jan 22 '15 at 13:14
  • 1
    @LukasEder I read your answer after editing mine - in reality we've got the same solution I'm just implementing my own tuple. Personally I find the code more readable using method references but that's probably just personally taste.
    – sprinter
    Jan 22 '15 at 13:42
  • 1
    Interesting approach. Yes, method references are more readable. I just couldn't get the darn things to compile in my Eclipse (there are still tons of bugs). On the other hand, this is all really low level. There should be a much higher-level, more "declarative", SQLesque way to express such common aggregation scenarios...
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 22 '15 at 16:35
  • 3
    @LukasEder as you point out SQL is a good language for SQLesque problems!
    – sprinter
    Jan 22 '15 at 22:57
4

I'm going to be using the Tuple2 type from jOOλ for this exercise, but you can also create your own tuple type if you want to avoid the dependency.

I'm also assuming you're using this to represent your data:

class A {
    final int w;
    final int x;
    final int y;
    final int z;

    A(int w, int x, int y, int z) {
        this.w = w;
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}

You can now write:

Map<Tuple2<Integer, Integer>, Tuple2<IntSummaryStatistics, IntSummaryStatistics>> map =
Stream.of(
    new A(1, 1, 1, 1),
    new A(1, 2, 3, 1),
    new A(9, 8, 6, 4),
    new A(9, 9, 7, 4),
    new A(2, 3, 4, 5),
    new A(2, 4, 4, 5),
    new A(2, 5, 5, 5))
.collect(Collectors.groupingBy(

    // This is your GROUP BY criteria
    a -> tuple(a.z, a.w),
    Collector.of(

        // When collecting, we'll aggregate data into two IntSummaryStatistics
        // for x and y
        () -> tuple(new IntSummaryStatistics(), new IntSummaryStatistics()),

        // The accumulator will simply take new t = (x, y) values
        (r, t) -> {
            r.v1.accept(t.x);
            r.v2.accept(t.y);
        },

        // The combiner will merge two partial aggregations,
        // in case this is executed in parallel
        (r1, r2) -> {
            r1.v1.combine(r2.v1);
            r1.v2.combine(r2.v2);

            return r1;
        }
    )
));

Or even better (using the latest jOOλ API):

Map<Tuple2<Integer, Integer>, Tuple2<IntSummaryStatistics, IntSummaryStatistics>> map =

// Seq is like a Stream, but sequential only, and with more features
Seq.of(
    new A(1, 1, 1, 1),
    new A(1, 2, 3, 1),
    new A(9, 8, 6, 4),
    new A(9, 9, 7, 4),
    new A(2, 3, 4, 5),
    new A(2, 4, 4, 5),
    new A(2, 5, 5, 5))

// Seq.groupBy() is just short for Stream.collect(Collectors.groupingBy(...))
.groupBy(
    a -> tuple(a.z, a.w),

    // Because once you have tuples, why not add tuple-collectors?
    Tuple.collectors(
        Collectors.summarizingInt(a -> a.x),
        Collectors.summarizingInt(a -> a.y)
    )
);

The map structure is now:

(z, w) -> (all_aggregations_of(x), all_aggregations_of(y))

Calling toString() on the above map will produce:

{
    (1, 1) = (IntSummaryStatistics{count=2, sum=3, min=1, average=1.500000, max=2}, 
              IntSummaryStatistics{count=2, sum=4, min=1, average=2.000000, max=3}), 
    (4, 9) = (IntSummaryStatistics{count=2, sum=17, min=8, average=8.500000, max=9}, 
              IntSummaryStatistics{count=2, sum=13, min=6, average=6.500000, max=7}), 
    (5, 2) = (IntSummaryStatistics{count=3, sum=12, min=3, average=4.000000, max=5}, 
              IntSummaryStatistics{count=3, sum=13, min=4, average=4.333333, max=5})
}

You got all your statistics now.

Side note

Of course, I don't know your exact requirements, but I suspect you'll be quickly needing more sophisticated aggregations in your report, such as medians, inverse distribution, and all sorts of nice OLAP features, which is when you realise that SQL is just a much easier language for this kind of task.

On the other hand, we'll definitely add more SQLesque features to jOOλ. This topic has also inspired me to write a full blog post with more details about the described approach.

3
  • 1
    Map<Tuple2<Integer, Integer>, Tuple2<IntSummaryStatistics, IntSummaryStatistics>> map = .... - I love java. A really concise, boilerplate-free language. </s> Jan 22 '15 at 17:52
  • 1
    Well, that's the type. You got the same type in other languages, you just don't always have to type it, if the compiler can infer enough things. As Java, when you chain another method...
    – Lukas Eder
    Jan 22 '15 at 17:58
  • 1
    Tuples weren't included because they are suitable for value types. Jan 23 '15 at 12:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.