11

What is the expected result for std::is_constructible on a type with a private or protected destructor?

For instance, I can still construct such an object on the heap even though only a friend can free it:

#include <type_traits>

class Foo
{
    friend void freeFoo(Foo*);
public:
    Foo()
    {}
private:
    // Destructor is private!
    ~Foo()
    {}
};

void freeFoo(Foo* f)
{
    delete f;  // deleting a foo is fine here because of friendship
}

int main()
{
    Foo* f = new Foo();
    // delete f;   // won't compile: ~Foo is private
    freeFoo(f);    // fine because of friendship


    if(!std::is_constructible<Foo>::value)
    {
        std::cout << "is_constructible failed" << std::endl;
    }
}

The final check for is_constructible will fail on both gcc and Visual C++ (gcc demo on coliru).

Is that the required behavior by the standard? If so, is there any way to check whether the type has a specific constructor, regardless of the access specifier on the destructor?

13

The C++14 FD defines is_constructible as follows:

Given the following function declaration:

template <class T>
add_rvalue_reference_t<T> create() noexcept;

the predicate condition for a template specialization is_constructible<T, Args...> shall be satisfied if and only if the following variable definition would be well-formed for some invented variable t:

T t(create<Args>()...);

Access checking is performed as if in a context unrelated to T and any of the Args. Only the validity of the immediate context of the variable initialization is considered. [ Note: The evaluation of the initialization can result in side effects such as the instantiation of class template specializations and function template specializations, the generation of implicitly-defined functions, and so on. Such side effects are not in the “immediate context” and can result in the program being ill-formed. —end note ]

Now the question essentially reduces to "Is the destructor call in the immediate context of the variable initialization?" [class.dtor]/11:

A destructor is invoked implicitly

  • for a constructed object with static storage duration (3.7.1) at program termination (3.6.3),
  • for a constructed object with automatic storage duration (3.7.3) when the block in which an object is created exits (6.7),
  • for a constructed temporary object when its lifetime ends (12.2).

In each case, the context of the invocation is the context of the construction of the object.

Thus the destructor invocation is in the context of the construction (which is presumably synonymous to initialization here), which implies that it is considered and causes the trait to return false.
I believe this to be underspecified (e.g. immediate vs not-explicitly-immediate context?), but intuitively I expect a conforming implementation to mark the expression NotDestructible() as ill-formed - either SFINAE-friendly or not (preferably the former). Never well-formed, though.
Clang with libc++, libstdc++ and GCC do say that it's invalid, SFINAE-friendly.


If so, is there any way to check whether the type has a specific constructor, regardless of the access specifier on the destructor?

What about using new?

template <typename T, typename... Args>
class is_only_constructible
{
    template <typename, typename=void> struct test : std::false_type {};
    template <typename U>
    struct test<U, decltype(void(new U(std::declval<Args>()...)))> : std::true_type {};

public:
    static constexpr bool value = test<T>::value;
};

Demo. Consistent traits can be easily established: Take the is_only_constructible trait and combine it with is_destructible (clearly the latter returns false when combined with private destructors).

  • I'm wondering: if the intention of the Committee was to have is_constructible<T, Args...>::value yield true even when T's destructor is inaccessible (which seems to be what you claim), why not specifying that trait's behavior in terms of a new expression? – Andy Prowl Jan 22 '15 at 11:51
  • @AndyProwl This is not what I mean. I think the comittee didn't properly consider this case and thus the text is underspecified. – Columbo Jan 22 '15 at 11:52
  • I see. I probably misunderstood this statement then: "As far as I can see, a destructor call is not in the immediate context of the initialization and should thus not be considered". – Andy Prowl Jan 22 '15 at 11:53
  • 1
    @AndyProwl I'm not sure about the intention. An EWG-issue would perhaps be appropriate, don't you think? – Columbo Jan 22 '15 at 12:03
  • 2
    @Columbo: Maybe, although I'm so used to the Standard being super-obscure that I sort of stopped reasoning about what the actual wording does imply, and rather started considering what the Committee's intention was more likely to be when writing it. The end result is the same ("I don't know and I might be wrong"), but at least I save some nerve lifetime by not bouncing from one ambiguous paragraph to another :) – Andy Prowl Jan 22 '15 at 12:43
5

Quoting paragraph [meta.unary.prop]/7 of the C++ Standard (Draft N4296):

Given the following function declaration:

template <class T>
add_rvalue_reference_t<T> create() noexcept;

the predicate condition for a template specialization is_constructible<T, Args...> shall be satisfied if and only if the following variable definition would be well-formed for some invented variable t:

T t(create<Args>()...);

In other words, is_constructible<T, Args...>::value yields false if the destructor is not accessible.

  • So what about the second part of the question: Is there any way to check whether the type has a specific constructor, regardless of the access specifier on the destructor? – ComicSansMS Jan 22 '15 at 10:12
  • @ComicSansMS: I'm afraid I can't answer that part (at least, not from the top of my head), although I suspect the answer is "no". – Andy Prowl Jan 22 '15 at 10:14
  • That's what I was afraid of. Checking for existence of an ordinary member function is not that hard, but constructors are tricky. I guess this could be considered an oversight in type_traits. – ComicSansMS Jan 22 '15 at 10:23
  • @ComicSansMS I have a possible workaround in my answer. – Columbo Jan 22 '15 at 11:34
  • 1
    @ComicSansMS: I don't know why, but for some reason I kept thinking about the detection of a private/protected constructor, while the problem is clearly the access specifier of the destructor. Columbo's solution is indeed what I should have thought of. – Andy Prowl Jan 22 '15 at 11:49

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