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I hope my problem is not too specific...

There are lots of questions and answers about how to return the exit code for a command that is piped into another command, but my case is a little different...

I have a generic command that I pipe the output to a syntax coloring scripts. This command is executed via LSF's bsub. Something like this:

bsub <switches> "command | colorize"

Assume the command returns a non zero exit value. The bsub is returning a zero exit value because the colorize command.

If I don't pipe it--

bsub <switches> "command"

the exit value is the correct non-zero value from command.

Is there a way to get the non-zero value with the pipe?

For full disclosure, this bsub is actually being called via a system() call in perl. As long as the bsub returns nonzero, the system call should return non-zero and all is good.

I looked at how to get exit codes from piped commands via $PIPESTATUS, but I don't think it works in this case because 1) I'm running from perl and not a shell, and 2) I don't know if bsub would return that.

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    Some shells like bash offer an option like -o pipefail which will cause a pipe chain to return the first non-zero return code (if any). I'm not familiar with bsub, but hopefully it offer a similar option. If not, you can call bash like bsub <switches> "bash -o pipefail -c 'command | colorize'" but it gets messy if command requires any character escaping. – Mr. Llama Jan 22 '15 at 22:46
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Following on Mr. Llama's comment that:

Some shells like bash offer an option like -o pipefail which will cause a pipe chain to return the first non-zero return code (if any).

You could put your pipeline into a script like so:

#!/bin/bash
set -o pipefail
command | colorize

Then submit your job by spooling the script directly into bsub:

bsub <switches> < yourscript.sh

As a sidenote, you can also define <switches> inside your script like so:

#!/bin/bash
#BSUB -n 4
#BSUB -o outfile.txt
set -o pipefail
command | colorize

Then spool it into bsub this way:

bsub < yourscript.sh
  • Thanks for the suggestion. In my case, I create the command on the fly, so putting it into a script would involve writing files, etc. More trouble than what it is worth I think. Instead, I did find a work around-- In my colorize script, I now count the # of error messages that are piped to it. If count >0, then the colorize script return a nonzero exit code, which LSF returns to perl. So, I think this is work. Thanks again. – ChrisMush Jan 29 '15 at 21:00

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