59

Is there an API to convert most possible String representations of Boolean values (e.g. "True", "true", "False", "false", "yes", "no", "1", "0") into a Bool in Swift?

If not, what would be the most Swift-like approach to coding this from scratch? Would it be a functional map() operation? Or something else?

The original source data in this instance is JSON, but I'm interested in the crux of solving the problem in the most Swift-like way possible and hence learning more about the language in the process.

13 Answers 13

79

There is not built in way AFAIK. Similar method to standard toInt() could be:

extension String {
    var bool: Bool? {
        switch self.lowercased() {
        case "true", "t", "yes", "y", "1":
            return true
        case "false", "f", "no", "n", "0":
            return false
        default:
            return nil
        }
    }
}
  • 9
    I've added to the switch self a "switch self.lowercased()" as you cannot expect the values to come always in the correct casing. func toBool() -> Bool? { switch self.lowercased() { case "true", "yes", "1": return true case "false", "no", "0": return false default: return nil } } – gmogames Dec 13 '16 at 18:50
  • 1
    This would better as a computed property. Just replace func toBool() -> Bool? with var bool: Bool? – future-adam Sep 7 '18 at 8:22
37

In objective-C, we have boolValue for a String. You can convert your string to NSString then use it, if it doesn't exist in Swift

var aString = NSString(string: "tRue")

var b = aString.boolValue

b should return true if aString.upperCase == "TRUE"

Update: for Info (just seen in apple API):

var boolValue: Bool { get } // Skips initial space characters (whitespaceSet), or optional -/+ sign followed by zeroes. Returns YES on encountering one of "Y", "y", "T", "t", or a digit 1-9. It ignores any trailing characters.

Update 2: I did a performance test of this method with extension method. The performance of this method is impressional. Here is the code of my test, I've called these functions in a GCD thread, using simulator, one after other.

dispatch_async(dispatch_queue_create("com.haduyenhoa.test", nil), {
            self.test1()
            self.test2()
        })


func test1() {
    let testTrue: String = "TRue"
    let testFalse: String = "faLse"

    let testNil: String = "whoops!"

    let begin : NSDate = NSDate()

    NSLog("BEGIN native")
    var testTrueObjC: NSString
    var testFalseObjC : NSString
    var testNilObjC:NSString

    for index in 1...100000 {
        testTrueObjC = NSString(string:testTrue)
         testFalseObjC = NSString(string:testFalse)
        testNilObjC = NSString(string:testNil)

        var b1 = testTrueObjC.boolValue // {Some true}

        var b2 = testFalseObjC.boolValue // {Some false}
        var b3 = testNilObjC.boolValue // nil
    }
    let end : NSDate = NSDate()
    let interval = end.timeIntervalSinceDate(begin)
   NSLog("DURATION native: \(interval)")
}

func test2() {
    let testTrue: String = "TRue"
    let testFalse: String = "faLse"

    let testNil: String = "whoops!"

    let begin : NSDate = NSDate()
    NSLog("BEGIN extension")
    for index in 1...100000 {
        var b1 = testTrue.boolValue() // {Some true}
        var b2 = testFalse.boolValue() // {Some false}
        var b3 = testNil.boolValue() // nil
    }
    let end : NSDate = NSDate()
    let interval = end.timeIntervalSinceDate(begin)
    NSLog("DURATION extension: \(interval)")

}

The console log:

2015-03-12 14:16:23.238 testSwift3[2343:298787] BEGIN native
2015-03-12 14:16:23.543 testSwift3[2343:298787] DURATION native: 0.305041968822479
2015-03-12 14:16:23.543 testSwift3[2343:298787] BEGIN extension
2015-03-12 14:16:35.360 testSwift3[2343:298787] DURATION extension: 11.8166469931602

We can improve the performance of the extension solution by simplify the rule. The performance is depend on how we implement the rule.

  • 1
    I think this is the way to go. Type cast to NSString then use .boolValue. You could also do this in an extension of string by type casting self to NSString then calling boolValue. Does anyone have any comments on this kind of thing regarding performance? Would it be quicker to write it with string comparison like other answers? – Lightbulb1 Mar 11 '15 at 14:28
  • I've updated my response with a performance test. – Duyen-Hoa Mar 12 '15 at 13:24
  • Wow. Thats a massive difference. My question was actually about using a type cast to NSString then using bool value vs peoples own implementations with string comparison like @Kirsteins answer (this may be whats in your extension). Anyway the difference here is huge, however you have implemented your extension, its certainly majorly slower than using NSStrings natively. I wonder whats making it so much slower... – Lightbulb1 Mar 12 '15 at 14:13
  • the extension is taken from Para's answer. As I said, it depends on how we implement our extension. I think that the cast from String (swift) to NSString (Objective-C) is not heavy. – Duyen-Hoa Mar 12 '15 at 14:19
  • Ok, Thank you for your investigation on this. Its interesting to see the performance differences. – Lightbulb1 Mar 12 '15 at 14:27
30

Typecasting along with a nice String extension and you're up and running

extension String {
var boolValue: Bool {
    return NSString(string: self).boolValue
}}
  • This is the simplest solution, and for small sets of strings any performance hit is tiny. – Maury Markowitz Feb 9 '16 at 21:55
  • I was going to say this is a sweet solution... But only problem is it will return false also for anything that isn't translatable into a boolean (eg. "dog", "cat", "xyz"). For this case you would probably want nil – Jonathan Crooke Mar 14 '17 at 16:15
  • How do I access this? For example if my function normally returns a boolean i.e. it does return false how can I do return "No match" using this extension? Thanks. – TokyoToo Mar 3 at 3:49
  • "No match" is not a boolean value, you should not use this function. a boolean value is just yes or no. – Nicolas Manzini Mar 5 at 15:21
13

Use this,

self.boolType = NSString(string:stringType!).boolValue
8

As already suggested, I would build an extension to String, listing only the string literals you would like to convert to true and false, keeping a nil case for what doesn't convert (or returning false in that case as well? Your choice!). You probably don't want your method to be case sensitive, by the way.

For example:

extension String {
    func boolValue() -> Bool? {
        let trueValues = ["true", "yes", "1"]
        let falseValues = ["false", "no", "0"]

        let lowerSelf = self.lowercaseString

        if contains(trueValues, lowerSelf) {
            return true
        } else if contains(falseValues, lowerSelf) {
            return false
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

let testTrue: String = "TRue"
testTrue.boolValue() // {Some true}
let testFalse: String = "faLse"
testFalse.boolValue() // {Some false}
let testNil: String = "whoops!"
testNil.boolValue() // nil

Be careful if you use an NSString object and its boolValue() method, as it returns true if it encounters "Y", "y", "T", "t", or a digit 1-9 (See docs here).

As an example:

let nsString = NSString(string: "tFalse")
nsString.boolValue // true
4

Conclusion from above answers:

You Can right simple one line extension and use.

Swift 3

extension String {
    func boolValueFromString() -> Bool {
        return NSString(string: self).boolValue
    }
}

Usage

 if (dictCardData.value(forKey: "isadmin") as! String).boolValueFromString() {
    // Stuff
}
3
 var st = "false"

 extension String {
   func toBool() -> Bool{
    if self == "false" {
        return false
    }else{
        return true
    }
}
}

 if st.toBool() == false {
     println("its ok")
 }
  • 1
    While this may answer the question, you did not leave behind any explanation as to why this works. This answer does not add much value for later visitors that may have the same problem. Please expand your answer to include some explanation. – oɔɯǝɹ Jan 23 '15 at 10:49
  • 1
    You could simply return self == "false", then no need for an if statement in toBool() – Dániel Nagy Jan 23 '15 at 10:54
3

No other answers deal with the potential of full or mixed caps strings. So why not take Kirsteins answer, mix it with some computed property magic and shazam:

extension String {
    var bool: Bool? {
        let lowercaseSelf = self.lowercased()

        switch lowercaseSelf {
        case "true", "yes", "1":
            return true
        case "false", "no", "0":
            return false
        default:
            return nil
        }
    }
}

Usage would be:

let trueBoolString = "TRUE"   // or "True", "true", "YES", "yEs", and so on
print(trueBoolString.bool)    // true
3

I took Nicolas Manzini's solution and modified it slightly. I recommend using the cast operator because it is bridged between String and NSString. It is unknown if it is a toll-free bridge, but it should have better performance than blindly creating a new object.

extension String {

    var boolValue: Bool {
        return (self as NSString).boolValue
    }
}
1

I prefer this implementation that handles optional strings and has a default value of false

extension Bool {
    init(_ string: String?) {
        guard let string = string else { self = false; return }

        switch string.lowercased() {
        case "true", "yes", "1":
            self = true
        default:
            self = false
        }
    }
}
0

one line solution for optional string

let value:String? = "put some string or even just nil here"
let trueOrFalse = NSString(string: value ?? "").boolValue
0

I refactored @Kirsteins code as Bool initializer with String value

extension Bool {

    init?(string: String) {
        switch string {
        case "True", "true", "yes", "1":
            self = true
        case "False", "false", "no", "0":
            self = false
        default:
            return nil
        }
    }

}


// tests
let one = Bool(string: "SDASD") // nil
let two = Bool(string: "0") // false
let three = Bool(string: "true") // true
let four = Bool(string: "null") // nil
0

If you use once, try this.

let str:String = "1"

var boo:Bool = str == "1" || str == "true" || str == "True" || str == "yes"

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