415

Is there any way to make pip play well with multiple versions of Python? For example, I want to use pip to explicitly install things to either my site 2.5 installation or my site 2.6 installation.

For example, with easy_install, I use easy_install-2.{5,6}.

And, yes — I know about virtualenv, and no — it's not a solution to this particular problem.

  • 7
    on my machine with just python 2xx and 3xx, pip2 and pip3 seem to do what I want – Yibo Yang Feb 14 '16 at 19:57
  • @YiboYang does it work with things like pip34 and pip35? – JinSnow Apr 3 at 10:50
  • 1
    @JinSnow It should, provided pip3.x actually manages the python version that you want to install packages to (perhaps run pip3.x -V to see). Or use @Hugo's solution to have better control over lots of python versions. – Yibo Yang Apr 3 at 21:16
  • Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/10919569/… – Mike D3ViD Tyson Jul 10 at 21:07

19 Answers 19

502

The current recommendation is to use python -m pip, where python is the version of Python you would like to use. This is the recommendation because it works across all versions of Python, and in all forms of virtualenv. For example:

# The system default python:
$ python -m pip install fish

# A virtualenv's python:
$ .env/bin/python -m pip install fish

# A specific version of python:
$ python-3.6 -m pip install fish

Previous answer, left for posterity:

Since version 0.8, Pip supports pip-{version}. You can use it the same as easy_install-{version}:

$ pip-2.5 install myfoopackage
$ pip-2.6 install otherpackage
$ pip-2.7 install mybarpackage

EDIT: pip changed its schema to use pipVERSION instead of pip-VERSION in version 1.5. You should use the following if you have pip >= 1.5:

$ pip2.6 install otherpackage
$ pip2.7 install mybarpackage

Check https://github.com/pypa/pip/pull/1053 for more details


References:

  • 12
    Doesn't work. Although the latest version of pip installed a pip-2.6 script, it didn't bother to install a pip-2.5 script. – Chris B. Feb 22 '11 at 20:06
  • 2
    You need to update your python2.5 pip version... It only creates pip-{PYVERSION} under the python you are using pip. – Hugo Tavares Feb 23 '11 at 23:45
  • 4
    This is incorrect. I'm running pip 1.2.1 with Python2.7 on Ubuntu, and there are no alternative pip versions. – Cerin Oct 2 '12 at 1:19
  • 2
    @rodling: probably you didn't installed pip via pip/easy_install or get-pip.py or you don't have python2.7. if you have python2.7, try: pip install --upgrade pip and you should have pip and pip-2.7 – Hugo Tavares Aug 16 '13 at 20:46
  • 2
    @J.C.Rocamonde: the program pip gets picked based on the environment variable $PATH. If you want to change what is the "default" pip program, reorder the $PATH environment variable. Search for something like "path environment variable linux" for more details on $PATH. – Hugo Tavares Jan 19 '16 at 20:39
88

In Windows, you can execute the pip module by mentioning the python version ( You need to ensure that the launcher is on your path )

py -3.4 -m pip install pyfora

py -2.7 -m pip install pyfora

Alternatively, you can call the desired python executable directly like this:

/path/to/python.exe -m pip install pyfora

  • 7
    having both 2.7 and 3.5 installed on windows, this worked right away – phil_lgr Mar 14 '17 at 4:21
  • Is there no way to have python2, python3, pip2 and pip3 on Windows? – thomthom Aug 21 '17 at 15:29
  • 1
    this worked for me on windows. had 3 installed and then installed 2 – daneshjai Aug 17 '18 at 2:53
75

/path/to/python2.{5,6} /path/to/pip install PackageName doesn't work?

For this to work on any python version that doesn't have pip already installed you need to download pip and do python*version* setup.py install. For example python3.3 setup.py install. This resolves the import error in the comments. (As suggested by @hbdgaf)

  • 4
    For this to work on say python 3 you need to download pip and do "python3 setup.py install". Personally I find this solution to be not very nice. For a start I didn't even know the pip command wasn't a binary. This isn't a criticism of @bwinton, I'm just surprised there isn't a better way to do this. – Mike Vella Apr 18 '12 at 13:17
  • 28
    "ImportError: No module named pkg_resources" – Cerin Oct 2 '12 at 1:18
  • 3
    I'm baffled that the problem with the importerror got more upticks than the solution to the same one comment above it. – RobotHumans Mar 2 '14 at 2:07
  • 1
    Also, /path/to/pip is this: python2.{5,6}/Scripts/pip2.{5,6} – raul Apr 30 '15 at 22:28
  • 2
    To call a module of python you should use python2.7 -m pip install PackageName – llrs Feb 22 '16 at 16:55
49

I had python 2.6 installed by default (Amazon EC2 AMI), but needed python2.7 plus some external packages for my application. Assuming you already installed python2.7 alongside with default python (2.6 in my case). Here is how to install pip and packages for non-default python2.7

Install pip for your python version:

curl -O https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py
python27 get-pip.py

Use specific pip version to install packages:

pip2.7 install mysql-connector-python --allow-external mysql-connector-python
  • 2
    great worked for me for python 3.4 with following: python3 get-pip.py and later using pip command with pip34 install example – Karl Adler Dec 8 '14 at 20:16
  • Thanks. Very useful. Tested on two different servers. – user2099484 Sep 15 '15 at 9:21
  • 2
    This worked when I used 'python2.7 get-pip.py' instead of 'python27 get-pip.py' – SummerEla Sep 30 '15 at 20:34
  • Man that felt sketchy but it worked for me installing pip2.6 on Centos 5. – Aaron R. Dec 17 '15 at 19:30
  • Got Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement pip (from versions: ) No matching distribution found for pip when I tried python2.6 get-pip.py – Pyderman Jan 14 '16 at 18:48
27

It worked for me in windows this way:

  1. I changed the name of python files python.py and pythonw.exe to python3.py pythonw3.py

  2. Then I just ran this command in the prompt:

    python3 -m pip install package

  • 4
    Just for anyone else figuring out how to install packages in python3 using pip on mac, this command is how you install packages. I spent hours searching and I've finally found it! – sidney Jul 3 '16 at 18:10
23

Other answers show how to use pip with both 2.X and 3.X Python, but does not show how to handle the case of multiple Python distributions (eg. original Python and Anaconda Python).

I have a total of 3 Python versions: original Python 2.7 and Python 3.5 and Anaconda Python 3.5.

Here is how I install a package into:

  1. Original Python 3.5:

    /usr/bin/python3 -m pip install python-daemon
    
  2. Original Python 2.7:

    /usr/bin/python -m pip install python-daemon
    
  3. Anaconda Python 3.5:

    python3 -m pip install python-daemon
    

    or

    pip3 install python-daemon
    

    Simpler, as Anaconda overrides original Python binaries in user environment.

    Of course, installing in anaconda should be done with conda command, this is just an example.


Also, make sure that pip is installed for that specific python.You might need to manually install pip. This works in Ubuntu 16.04:

sudo apt-get install python-pip 

or

sudo apt-get install python3-pip
  • The advice regarding Anaconda here is not accurate... it doesn't "override" anything. The fact that it is picking up the Anaconda version as default on your system is simply a side-effect of your specific configuration, how you installed each interpreter, and your environment's path ordering.... those will vary for others. – Corey Goldberg Feb 21 '17 at 15:39
  • @CoreyGoldberg I agree, it was the default on my installation of Ubuntu 16.04 – quasoft Feb 23 '17 at 9:00
  • 1
    You sir, are the man. Of all the totally useless explanations surrounding this issue, this is the only one that has made sense to me. Time to alias these commands and get on with my life! THANK YOU. – Iofacture Mar 18 '17 at 0:20
14

I ran into this issue myself recently and found that I wasn't getting the right pip for Python 3, on my Linux system that also has Python 2.

First you must ensure that you have installed pip for your python version:

For Python 2:

sudo apt-get install python-pip

For Python 3:

sudo apt-get install python3-pip

Then to install packages for one version of Python or the other, simply use the following for Python 2:

pip install <package>

or for Python 3:

pip3 install <package>
11

pip is also a python package. So the easiest way to install modules to a specific python version would be below

 python2.7 /usr/bin/pip install foo

or

python2.7 -m pip install foo
10

So apparently there are multiple versions of easy_install and pip. It seems to be a big mess. Anyway, this is what I did to install Django for Python 2.7 on Ubuntu 12.10:

$ sudo easy_install-2.7 pip
Searching for pip
Best match: pip 1.1
Adding pip 1.1 to easy-install.pth file
Installing pip-2.7 script to /usr/local/bin

Using /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages
Processing dependencies for pip
Finished processing dependencies for pip

$ sudo pip-2.7 install django
Downloading/unpacking django
  Downloading Django-1.5.1.tar.gz (8.0Mb): 8.0Mb downloaded
  Running setup.py egg_info for package django

    warning: no previously-included files matching '__pycache__' found under directory '*'
    warning: no previously-included files matching '*.py[co]' found under directory '*'
Installing collected packages: django
  Running setup.py install for django
    changing mode of build/scripts-2.7/django-admin.py from 644 to 755

    warning: no previously-included files matching '__pycache__' found under directory '*'
    warning: no previously-included files matching '*.py[co]' found under directory '*'
    changing mode of /usr/local/bin/django-admin.py to 755
Successfully installed django
Cleaning up...

$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Sep 26 2012, 21:51:14) 
[GCC 4.7.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import django
>>> 
  • Thanks, this was the only thing that worked for me on RHEL. – Matthew Moisen Nov 11 '14 at 6:32
  • sudo pip-2.7 install django does not work anymore – Bren Oct 11 '15 at 21:48
7

On Linux, Mac OS X and other POSIX systems, use the versioned Python commands in combination with the -m switch to run the appropriate copy of pip:

python2.7 -m pip install SomePackage
python3.4 -m pip install SomePackage

(appropriately versioned pip commands may also be available)

On Windows, use the py Python launcher in combination with the -m switch:

py -2.7 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 2.7
py -3.4 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 3.4

if you get an error for py -3.4 then try:

pip install SomePackage
6

From here: https://docs.python.org/3/installing/

Here is how to install packages for various versions that are installed at the same time linux, mac, posix:

python2   -m pip install SomePackage  # default Python 2
python2.7 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 2.7
python3   -m pip install SomePackage  # default Python 3
python3.4 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 3.4
python3.5 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 3.5
python3.6 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 3.6

On Windows, use the py Python launcher in combination with the -m switch:

py -2   -m pip install SomePackage  # default Python 2
py -2.7 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 2.7
py -3   -m pip install SomePackage  # default Python 3
py -3.4 -m pip install SomePackage  # specifically Python 3.4
2

Most of the answers here address the issue but I want to add something what was continually confusing me with regard to creating an alternate installation of python in the /usr/local on CentOS 7. When I installed there, it appeared like pip was working since I could use pip2.7 install and it would install modules. However, what I couldn't figure out was why my newly installed version of python wasn't seeing what I was installing.

It turns out in CentOS 7 that there is already a python2.7 and a pip2.7 in the /usr/bin folder. To install pip for your new python distribution, you need to specifically tell sudo to go to /usr/local/bin

sudo /usr/local/bin/python2.7 -m ensurepip

This should get pip2.7 installed in your /usr/local/bin folder along with your version of python. The trick is that when you want to install modules, you either need to modify the sudo $PATH variable to include /usr/local/bin or you need to execute

sudo /usr/local/bin/pip2.7 install <module>

if you want to install a new module. It took me forever to remember that sudo wasn't immediately seeing /usr/local/bin.

0

Context: Archlinux

Action:
Install python2-pip:
sudo pacman -S python2-pip

You now have pip2.7:
sudo pip2.7 install boto

Test (in my case I needed 'boto'):
Run the following commands:

python2
import boto

Success: No error.

Exit: Ctrl+D

0

for example, if you set other versions (e.g. 3.5) as default and want to install pip for python 2.7:

  1. download pip at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pip (tar)
  2. unzip tar file
  3. cd to the file’s directory
  4. sudo python2.7 setup.py install
0

You can go to for example C:\Python2.7\Scripts and then run cmd from that path. After that you can run pip2.7 install yourpackage...

That will install package for that version of Python.

0

Here is my take on the problem. Works for Python3. The main features are:

  • Each Python version is compiled from source
  • All versions are installed locally
  • Does not mangle your system's default Python installation in any way
  • Each Python version is isolated with virtualenv

The steps are as follows:

  1. If you have several extra python versions installed in some other way, get rid of them, e.g., remove $HOME/.local/lib/python3.x, etc. (also the globally installed ones). Don't touch your system's default python3 version though.

  2. Download source for different python versions under the following directory structure:

    $HOME/
        python_versions/ : download Python-*.tgz packages here and "tar xvf" them.  You'll get directories like this:
          Python-3.4.8/
          Python-3.6.5/
          Python-3.x.y/
          ...
    
  3. At each "Python-3.x.y/" directory, do the following (do NOT use "sudo" in any of the steps!):

    mkdir root
    ./configure --prefix=$PWD/root 
    make -j 2
    make install
    virtualenv --no-site-packages -p root/bin/python3.x env
    
  4. At "python_versions/" create files like this:

    env_python3x.bash:
    
    #!/bin/bash
    echo "type deactivate to exit"
    source $HOME/python_versions/Python-3.x.y/env/bin/activate
    
  5. Now, anytime you wish to opt for python3.x, do

    source $HOME/python_versions/env_python3x.bash
    

    to enter the virtualenv

  6. While in the virtualenv, install your favorite python packages with

    pip install --upgrade package_name
    
  7. To exit the virtualenv and python version just type "deactivate"

0

This is probably the completely wrong thing to do (I'm a python noob), but I just went in and edited the pip file

#!/usr/bin/env python3 <-- I changed this line.

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import re
import sys

from pip._internal import main

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.argv[0] = re.sub(r'(-script\.pyw?|\.exe)?$', '', sys.argv[0])
    sys.exit(main())
0

Installation of multiple versions of Python and respective Packages.

Python version on the same windows machine : 2.7 , 3.4 and 3.6

Installation of all 3 versions of Python :

  • Installed the Python 2.7 , 3.4 and 3.6 with the below paths

enter image description here

PATH for all 3 versions of Python :

  • Made sure the PATH variable ( in System Variables ) has below paths included - C:\Python27\;C:\Python27\Scripts;C:\Python34\;C:\Python34\Scripts;C:\Python36\;C:\Python36\Scripts\;

Renaming the executables for versions :

  • Changed the python executable name in C:\Python36 and C:\Python34 to python36 and python34 respectively.

enter image description here

Checked for the command prompt with all versions :

enter image description here

Installing the packages separately for each version

enter image description here

0

For windows specifically: \path\to\python.exe -m pip install PackageName works.

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