4

When checking reference type in Perl, why is it better to use the constant pragma:

use constant HASH => ref {};

die "I expect a hashref" unless $ref_type eq HASH;

than a hardcoded string:

die "I expect a hashref" unless $ref_type eq 'HASH';

What are the advantages and disadvantages (if any)?

4
  • Why would it be better to use a module when the same functionality can be achieved with a string?
    – TLP
    Jan 25 '15 at 15:31
  • @TLP: I don't understand your comment. You seem to be reiterating the OP's question.
    – Borodin
    Jan 25 '15 at 16:36
  • @TLP: yes, that's basically my question :-)
    – jreisinger
    Jan 25 '15 at 16:40
  • Well, the OP asks "Why is it better to use the constant pragma", and I said "Why would it be better?" Presumably he heard this somewhere in some context, which is why he asked the question.
    – TLP
    Jan 25 '15 at 18:42
5

The primary advantage that I can see is that, with strict 'subs' in effect, if an identifier is misspelled then it will raise an error, whereas misspelling a string will go unnoticed.

For instance, if I write

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = {};

die "I expect a hashref" unless ref $data eq 'HSH';

then my code compiles with no problems, but will not run correctly. But if I had instead

use strict;
use warnings;

use constant HASH => ref {};

my $data = {};

die "I expect a hashref" unless ref $data eq HSH;

Then I am told

Bareword "HSH" not allowed while "strict subs" in use

before the program even starts to run.


This is an appropriate place to mention the reftype function provided by Scalar::Util.

The ref operator will return HASH if it is applied to a simple hash reference. However, if that reference has been blessed to turn it into a Perl object, ref will return the name of the class into which the reference has been blessed.

An object is most often a blessed hash reference, but it can be formed from a reference to any type of data -- including subroutines and typeglobs. Clearly a simple ref will not help us to discover what underlying Perl data type has been used to create the object, so reftype was written to fill this gap.

Consider this Perl program

use strict;
use warnings;

use Scalar::Util 'reftype';

my $data = { };

print "Plain hash reference\n";
printf "  ref     => %s\n", ref $data;
printf "  reftype => %s\n", reftype $data;

bless $data, 'Class';

print "\nBlessed hash reference\n";
printf "  ref     => %s\n", ref $data;
printf "  reftype => %s\n", reftype $data;

output

Plain hash reference
  ref     => HASH
  reftype => HASH

Blessed hash reference
  ref     => Class
  reftype => HASH

As you can see, ref and reftype return the same result for a simple hash reference, whereas only reftype can see behind the class of a blessed reference to see that its underlying data type is unchanged.

2
  • Thanks for an extensive explanation! (You have an URL included in the code section. I am not allowed to edit it.)
    – jreisinger
    Jan 25 '15 at 16:41
  • @jreisinger: Thanks. Fixed.
    – Borodin
    Jan 25 '15 at 16:47
1

@Borodin has the correct answer in this case, typo protection. It's worth mentioning that this technique also protects you from undocumented assumptions. If the behavior of ref {} were not documented, the code would continue working if it changed later. (I can't think of a good example where it would be useful right now).

However, the odds of the documented behavior of ref changing are so unlikely you should take out insurance against being hit by a dinosaur riding a meteor instead.


You also asked about disadvantages. There is a very small performance hit to creating constants, but this is only at startup. We're talking milliseconds. Once created, they carry no penalties for being used.

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