9

I am using a generic repository pattern Repository<TEntity> where repositories access the entities through a context. Then I have a service layer that accepts a context in the constructor. Now I can have multiple repositories in a service, accessing the entities through the same context. Pretty standard. This is perfect for tables/views that map to entities, but I cannot unit test data coming through stored procedures.

This is my current setup:

IDbContext:

public interface IDbContext : IDisposable
{
    IDbSet<T> Set<T>() where T : class;

    DbEntityEntry<T> Entry<T>(T entity) where T : class;

    void SetModified(object entity);

    int SaveChanges();

    // Added to be able to execute stored procedures
    System.Data.Entity.Database Database { get; }
}

Context:

public class AppDataContext : DbContext, IDbContext
{
    public AppDataContext()
        : base("Name=CONNECTIONSTRING")
    {
        base.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    }

    public new IDbSet<T> Set<T>() where T : class
    {
        return base.Set<T>();
    }


    public void SetModified(object entity)
    {
        Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new BookingMap());
    }

    // Added to be able to execute stored procedures
    System.Data.Entity.Database Database { get { return base.Database; } }
}

Generic Repository:

public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly IDbContext context;

    public Repository(IDbContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public IQueryable<T> GetAll()
    {
        return this.context.Set<T>().AsQueryable();
    }

    public void Add(T entity)
    {
        this.context.Set<T>().Add(entity);
    }

    public void Delete(T entity)
    {
        this.context.Set<T>().Remove(entity);
    }

    public void DeleteAll(IEnumerable<T> entities)
    {
        foreach (var e in entities.ToList())
        {
            this.context.Set<T>().Remove(e);
        }
    }

    public void Update(T entity)
    {
        this.context.Set<T>().Attach(entity);
        this.context.SetModified(entity);
    }

    public void SaveChanges()
    {
        this.context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (this.context != null)
        {
            this.context.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Service:

public class BookingService
{
    IDbContext _context;

    IRepository<Booking> _bookingRepository;

    public BookingService(IDbContext context)
    {
        _context = context;

        _bookingRepository = new Repository<Booking>(context);
    }

    public IEnumerable<Booking> GetAllBookingsForName(string name)
    {
        return (from b in _bookingRepository.GetAll()
                where b.Name == name
                select b);
    }
}

Test:

[TestClass]
public class BookingServiceTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void Test_Get_All_Bookings_For_Name()
    {
        var mock = new Mock<IDbContext>();
        mock.Setup(x => x.Set<Booking>())
            .Returns(new FakeDbSet<Booking>
            {
                new Booking { Name = "Foo" },
                new Booking { Name = "Bar" }
            });

        BookingService _bookingService = new BookingService(mock.Object);

        var bookings = _bookingService.GetAllBookingsForName(name);

        Assert.AreEqual(2, bookings.Count(), "Booking count is not correct");
    }
}

This is perfect for tables/views that map to entities, but I cannot unit test data coming through stored procedures.

I looked up on the internet and found DbContext.Database property and I am able to execute stored procedures with the .SqlQuery() function and map them to an entity type.

This is what I added to the Repository<T> class:

public IEnumerable<T> SqlQuery(string storedProc, params object[] paramList)
{
    return this.context.Database.SqlQuery<T>(storedProc, paramList);
}

And call the .SqlQuery() function in my service class:

public IEnumerable<Booking> GetAllBookings(string name)
{
    return _bookingRepository.SqlQuery("EXEC GetAllBookings @name = {0}", name);
}

This works great (I am able to get some data), but my question is how can I mock and unit test this?

  • It's useless to mock a stored procedure. How would you know the real thing runs as expected if the unit test has a green light? If you need the data from a sproc to do unit tests with (not related to the sproc's logic), you can just create mock data. To test sprocs, do integration tests. – Gert Arnold Jan 25 '15 at 22:22
  • Exactly, I'm just going to need the data from the sproc to do unit tests with. How can I create the mock data? – Gaui Jan 25 '15 at 22:24
  • I think to begin with, you should encapsulate sprocs in your repository, A service shouldn't know about SQL (or any persistence details). – Gert Arnold Jan 25 '15 at 22:32
  • But this is a generic repository, so why should it contain functionality specific for bookings? – Gaui Jan 25 '15 at 22:33
  • I see your problem, but I don't know. I don't like generic repo's so I don't use them. What I meant by creating test data for unit tests is: creating them without faking them to come from a repo. Just create a Booking (or a Mock) for the unit test, and test its behavior. That's how I do unit tests. When it comes to testing things that involve EF, I only do integration test, and I'm very happy about it. – Gert Arnold Jan 25 '15 at 23:07
9

I just encountered a need to do this, and my googling led me to this question. I didn't like the answer from Sriram Sakthivel, I didn't want to have to introduce yet another abstraction when I already had one in place:

I already had an interface which I had extracted from my DbContext, and implemented in a test double.

I simply added int ExecuteSqlCommand(string sql, params object[] parameters) to my interface, and in the actual context I implemented it like this:

public int ExecuteSqlCommand(string sql, params object[] parameters)
{
    return Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(sql, parameters);
}

Which obviously just delegates to the actual EF Database property to do the work.

And in my test double I implemented it like this:

public int ExecuteSqlCommand(string sql, params object[] parameters)
{
    return 0;
}

Which doesn't really do anything, which is the point: You aren't unit testing the actual stored procedure, you just need a way to get it to return something useful.

I imagine at some point I 'might' need it to return something other than 0 in a unit test, at which point I'll probably introduce something like a Func<int> executeSqlCommandResultFactory to test double constructor so that I can control it, but at the moment YAGNI applies.

5

You can abstract away the Database property with some interface say IDatabase with SqlQuery method.

interface IDatabase
{
    public IEnumerable<T> SqlQuery<T>(string sql, params Object[] parameters);
}

class DatabaseWrapper : IDatabase
{
    private readonly Database database;
    public DatabaseWrapper(Database database)
    {
        this.database = database;
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> SqlQuery<T>(string sql, params Object[] parameters)
    {
        return database.SqlQuery<T>(storedProc, paramList);
    }
}

Modify your IDbContext interface to use IDatabase instead of concrete instance so that we can mock it.

public interface IDbContext : IDisposable
{
    ...

    // Added to be able to execute stored procedures
    IDatabase Database { get; }
}

and your implementation this way

public class AppDataContext : DbContext, IDbContext
{
    private readonly IDatabase database;
    public AppDataContext()
        : base("Name=CONNECTIONSTRING")
    {
        base.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
        this.database = new DatabaseWrapper(base.Database);
    }
    ...

    // Added to be able to execute stored procedures
    IDatabase Database { get { return database; } }
}

At this point I believe you know how to mock the IDatabase to return the test data.

  • Thank you for this detailed example. This is somewhat what I had in mind. – Gaui Jan 25 '15 at 22:36
  • System.Data.Entity.Database doesn't implement IDatabase (or any interface). I don't see how this could work. Maybe IDbContext could have a method SqlQuery (that the real one implements as Database.SqlQuery). But besides that, I think your last sentence is very optimistic. It would require parsing SQL statements, which isn't trivial, even if it's only about simple sproc calls. It's the SQL itself that should be abstracted away. – Gert Arnold Jan 25 '15 at 22:59
  • @GertArnold I'm not sure I understand you. You don't need to parse any SQL for this. We're just using something like Adapter pattern; wrapping the DbContext.Database to interface here this.database = new DatabaseWrapper(base.Database); and just delegating the work to itself. So I'm not sure what you mean. I assume you overlooked my code or I'm missing something, – Sriram Sakthivel Jan 26 '15 at 6:58
  • You're right, I overlooked the wrapper, sorry. I don't know how you'd implement database.SqlQuery though. That would require some level of parsing, because how would you decide what to return in response to a SQL string? – Gert Arnold Jan 26 '15 at 7:33
  • 1
    @DRAM That depends on the mocking framework you use. I hope this question will help you to mock with moq. Should you still have questions? Please ask new question and give the link. I'll take a look at it. Thanks. – Sriram Sakthivel Jan 5 '16 at 7:22
1

I realize this is an old question, but to anyone having a similar issue, here's my take.

Why not just use AutoFixture to create an object of the data you usually return from the stored procedure and mock your repository to return it?

public class FooBar
{
    private Fixture fixture;
    private Mock<BookingRepository> bookingRepository; 

    public FooBar()
    {
        fixture = new Fixture();
        bookingRepository= new Mock<BookingRepository>();
    }

    public void TestInitialize()
    {
        var sprocObject = fixture.Create<DbObject>();

        bookingRepository.Setup(x => x.GetAllBookings(It.IsAny<string>())).Returns(sprocObject);
    }

    // Unit tests
}

As Gert Arnold said, you should do integration tests if you want to test the actual stored procedure. If you're testing the service/repository logic you just need to return some data.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.