8

Consider this class:

class Widget
{
    Widget::Widget();
    bool initialize();
}

A Widget has the following characteristics:

  1. initialize() must be invoked to fully construct
  2. initialize() may fail
  3. initialize() is expensive

Given that, I am encapsulating creation in factory function that always returns the same Widget instance:

Widget* widget() {
    static auto w = new Widget;
    static auto initialized = false;

    if (!initialized) {
        if (!w->initialize()) {
            return nullptr;
        }
        initialized = true;
    }

    return w;
}

What should the return type of widget() be?

In particular, I'd like to somehow make it clear that the lifetime of the returned Widget will outlast any caller, but without referencing the internal implementation.

  1. Return a raw pointer and add a comment that states "The returned pointer points to an object with static storage duration that will not be deleted before the end of the program". This is simple, but not self-documenting.
  2. Return a std::shared_ptr<Widget>. This is self-documenting, but I don't like that it will introduce completely unnecessary reference counting overhead.
  3. Return a std::unique_ptr<Widget> with a custom deleter function that is a no-op. I think this has the same perceived problem as #2 if the caller converts it into a shared_ptr.
  • It's really a matter of opinion, but in this particular case I wouldn't worry about refcounting overhead. If your Widget type "is expensive" to create, than any "unnecessary reference counting overhead" is likely to be trivial by comparison. – MrEricSir Jan 25 '15 at 23:47
  • 2
    Should we be ignoring the multithread-unsafeness of this? (Even in C++11 this isn't safe) – Andre Kostur Jan 26 '15 at 6:24
  • 1
    I don't think Factory is the correct term for this. In my mind a factory is something that creates an object and passes ownership to the caller. This is more like a Singleton. – Chris Drew Jan 26 '15 at 9:48
  • 1
    I don't think 2. and 3. are self documenting at all. If I call a function that returns a std::shared_ptr/std::unique_ptr I expect to be taking shared/unique ownership. – Chris Drew Jan 26 '15 at 10:09
  • 2
    @JoshuaJohnson Assuming C++11: While the initialization of the static variables is guaranteed to be threadsafe (it's the runtime's responsibility to ensure that the static initialization only happens once), the code that's checking if (!initialized) is unsafe. If the widget() function is called in two threads nearly simultaneously, it is possible for both threads to think that initialized is still false, and they both will call initialize(). Particularly if initialize() make take some time, this would increase the possibility of double-initialization. – Andre Kostur Jan 26 '15 at 18:39
11

I vote for:

boost::optional<Widget&> widget() {
    static Widget w; // no reason for this to be a pointer
    static bool initialized = false;

    if (!initialized) {
        if (!w.initialize()) {
            return boost::none;
        }
        initialized = true;
    }

    return w;
}

It makes it clear that the caller doesn't own the Widget in any way, there's no worry of the caller delete-ing the Widget, and it's clear whether or not the call succeeded.

  • What about in an environment w/o Boost? – Josh Johnson Jan 25 '15 at 23:54
  • 1
    @JoshuaJohnson You could just copy optional from there - it's a header only library. There's also std::experimental::optional. Or you could just write your own class that has a possibly-null Widget* member that you have to dereference to get out. – Barry Jan 26 '15 at 0:18
  • 1
    experimental optional has no reference support, last I checked. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jan 26 '15 at 0:34
  • @JoshuaJohnson If shared_ptr is considered unnecessary overhead, doesn't optional introduce overhead ? Is that ok for you ? – Jagannath Jan 26 '15 at 9:05
7

Isn't a raw pointer the right thing to do here? It expresses the restrictions already. It can fail (by returning nullptr), and since it makes no promises about the pointer, callers can't safely cause it to be deleted. You're getting a raw pointer, you can't make the assumption that you're allowed to make any statements about the lifetime of the pointed-to object.

  • I think a raw pointer is fine. It documents the fact that the caller is not expected to take ownership and it could be null. I think whatever option is chosen it still needs to be made clear with comments or naming conventions that this is a Singleton so the lifetime is clear. – Chris Drew Jan 26 '15 at 10:05
1

Herb Sutter's recommendation in this case (item 4 at http://herbsutter.com/2013/05/30/gotw-90-solution-factories/) is to return optional.

There could be one additional reason the function might have returned a pointer, namely to return nullptr to indicate failure to produce an object. Normally it’s better throw an exception to report an error if we fail to load the widget. However, if not being able to load the widget is normal operation and should not be considered an error, return an optional, and probably make the factory noexcept if no other kinds of errors need to be reported than are communicated well by returning an empty optional.

  • Isn't Herb talking about the case where the caller takes ownership of the object being returned? – Chris Drew Jan 26 '15 at 9:44
  • Ah, yes, good point. I wonder if it's best to delete this answer then? – Johann Gerell Jan 26 '15 at 10:08
1

As other people noted if the factory will only produce one item, factory perhaps is not the right term. It seems a Singleton.

Taking in account that:

  • We will create only one instance of Widget
  • That instance will be constructed the first time someone ask for it (if any)
  • That instance will live until program end AND should be destroyed then
  • Nobody should delete the instance

I'll try something like this:

class Widget {
public:
    static Widget& Instance() {
        static Widget w{};
        return w;
    }

private:
    Widget() {
        // Expensive construction
    }
    Widget(const Widget&) = delete; // avoid copy

};
  • This is fine but it doesn't handle the situation where initialization might fail. – Chris Drew Jan 26 '15 at 14:16
0

To make lifetime and ownership clearer I would use the conventions of the Singleton pattern and make your function a static getInstance function on the Widget class.

class Widget {
  bool initialize();
 public:
  static Widget* getInstance() {
    static Widget w;
    static bool initialized = false;

    if (!initialized) {
      if (!w.initialize()) {
         return nullptr;
      }
      initialized = true;
    }
    return &w;
  }
};

I think a raw pointer return type documents the fact that the caller is not expected to take ownership and it could be null.

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