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I am doing this science fair for school: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/CompSci_p046.shtml#summary

They provide a simple program to "hack" passwords you enter into the program. One method it does is use a list of words to match the inputted password. I upgraded the list to 64216 words/passwords. When I put in a word for example "lawnmower". I get the result:

The search took 0.05 seconds for 73,913 tests or 1,447,884 tests per second.

How could it have taking 73913 guesses when the list only has 64216 words? Confused about this

Here is the code to that method:

def search_method_3(file_name):
    global totalguesses
    result = False

    # Start by reading the list of words into a Python list
    f = open(file_name)
    words = f.readlines()
    f.close
    # We need to know how many there are
    number_of_words = len(words)
    print("Using method 3 with "+str(number_of_words)+" in the list")

    ## Depending on the file system, there may be extra characters before
    ## or after the words. 
    for i in range(0, number_of_words):
        words[i] = cleanup(words[i])

    # Let's try each one as the password and see what happens
    starttime = time.time()
    tests = 0
    still_searching = True
    word1count = 0           # Which word we'll try next

    while still_searching:
        ourguess_pass = words[word1count]
        #print("Guessing: "+ourguess_pass)
        # Try it the way it is in the word list
        if (check_userpass(which_password, ourguess_pass)):
            print ("Success! Password "+str(which_password)+" is " + ourguess_pass)
            still_searching = False   # we can stop now - we found it!
            result = True
        #else:
            #print ("Darn. " + ourguess_pass + " is NOT the password.")
        tests = tests + 1
        totalguesses = totalguesses + 1
        # Now let's try it with the first letter capitalized
        if still_searching:
            ourguess_pass = Cap(ourguess_pass)
            #print("Guessing: "+ourguess_pass)
            if (check_userpass(which_password, ourguess_pass)):
                print ("Success! Password "+str(which_password)+" is " + ourguess_pass)
                still_searching = False   # we can stop now - we found it!
                result = True
            #else:
                #print ("Darn. " + ourguess_pass + " is NOT the password.")
            tests = tests + 1
            totalguesses = totalguesses + 1

        word1count = word1count + 1
        if (word1count >=  number_of_words):
            still_searching = False

    seconds = time.time()-starttime
    report_search_time(tests, seconds)
    return result
  • 1
    I just had a quick glance, but you seem to increment tests and totalguesses twice per loop. – Dave Jan 26 '15 at 8:54
  • Also, there is no line to print that message. Maybe the code is incomplete? – David Moreno García Jan 26 '15 at 8:54
  • @DavidMorenoGarcía I believe that's what report_search_time call does. – Himal Jan 26 '15 at 8:56
  • The line to print that message is lower, but is part of the main function rather than this one. – Citation Jan 26 '15 at 8:56
  • I'm just asking to be sure that is not a mistake in tha part of the code. – David Moreno García Jan 26 '15 at 8:57
1

The answer is simple: for each "guess", you try the lowercase version and the capitalized version. Each time you do this, you increment your counts. Twice. Here is a cleaned up version to show what I mean:

while still_searching:
    #try lowercase password
    tests += 1
    totalguesses += 1
    if still_searching: #you can get rid of this condition because you test it in the while header already
        #try capitalized password
        tests += 1
        totalguesses += 1

So if you only want to see how many times you tried a specific word without taking into account that you also try the capitalized version, I suggest you remove the second set of increments. Maybe you meant to say that you did x total guesses and y tests with x being the number of words you tested and y being the number of actual comparisons?

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