1

I want to include a variable declared in an external file in C.

My project structure looks like this.

foo.h
foo.c
variable.c
main.c

What I'm doing right now is

/* main.c */

#include "foo.h"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


int main() {
    bar();
    printf("%d\n", a);
    return 0;
}

/* foo.h */

#ifndef FOO_H
#define FOO_H

#include "variable.c"

extern const int a;
extern const int b[];


int bar();
#endif

/* foo.c */

#include "foo.h" 
#include <stdio.h>

int bar () {
    printf("tururu\n");
    printf("%d\n", b[0]);
    return 0;
}

/* variable.c */

const int a = 2;
const int b[3] = {1, 2, 3};

The variables I want to define this way are constant (read-only).

I do not know beforehand the size of the array, it depends on the definition in variable.c.

So my question is:

  • Is this the proper way to include some constant variables from an external source?

  • If it is, what am I doing wrong and how could be fixed?

Thank you

EDIT: I have updated my code with an example that can be tested. This code is not compiling because it says 'b' is undeclared in function bar. If I comment out the printf in bar it compiles and run. So the variables can be seen by main but not by foo.c?

EDIT2: Variables included this way are read-only. I have updated the code and add the include of foo.h in foo.c and now the compiler tell that there are multiple definitions of 'a' and 'b'

EDIT3: Clean up the code and the question trying to be more clear.

10
  • 2
    possible duplicate of How do I use extern to share variables between source files in C? Jan 26, 2015 at 11:05
  • I have read that before writing my question but it didn't answer mine. My problem is that I can't define and initialize my variable in foo.c I need to to that in an external file and in that question this issue is not observed. But thanks for linking, it is a very useful answer there.
    – pepelu
    Jan 26, 2015 at 11:55
  • I also have updated the question in order to make clear the differences.
    – pepelu
    Jan 26, 2015 at 12:14
  • foo.c needs to include foo.h (to make a declaration visible), foo.h should not include variable.h, and for most cases definitions don't go into headers (this header must not be included by more than one file if it defines a variable).
    – mafso
    Jan 26, 2015 at 12:21
  • Problem 1: it never makes any sense to declare or define non-constant variables inside a h file. Problem 2: it never makes any sense to use global variables. Instead, use file scope static variables and setters/getters, as demonstrated here. Problem 3: your program design is fundamentally broken and needs to be re-made from scratch: it doesn't make any sense to distribute the variables like you do.
    – Lundin
    Jan 26, 2015 at 12:23

3 Answers 3

2

Remove #include "variable.c" from foo.h, and your code should work.

You're basically using extern to tell your compiler that whatever you use in a declaration after the extern keyword will be defined in another .c source file that is linked separately. In your case, this .c file is variable.c.

And yeah, take care to never #include .c files. This can easily lead to the linker going haywire.

2
  • 2
    variable.c should also include foo.h so the compiler can catch type-mismatches.
    – mafso
    Jan 26, 2015 at 13:56
  • @mafso: yes, I didn't notice OP didn't originally do this =)
    – user3079266
    Jan 26, 2015 at 13:58
2

The variables must be defined in a c file, while in the header you can put the extern reference

/* foo.h */
#ifndef FOO_H
#define FOO_H

#include "variable.h"

extern int a;
extern int b[];

#endif

/* foo.c */

int a = 2;
int b[3] = {1, 2, 3};
1
  • The thing here is that I cannot define the variables in foo.c I need to do that from an external file.
    – pepelu
    Jan 26, 2015 at 11:51
1

It is a good practice to declare variable in header file and define in c file

more detail: Variable Definition vs Declaration

In your variable.h, you just define two variable

So, it is not the proper way

Besides the code related to the array is not wrong, you can put it in a .c file

1
  • Unless the variable is constant (read-only), it is very bad practice to declare it in a header file. Don't use global variables.
    – Lundin
    Jan 26, 2015 at 12:17

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