2

Here are my lex and yacc file to recognise palindrome strings but it is giving "INVALID "for both valid as well as invalid string. Please help me to find the problem, I am new to lex and yacc. Thanx in advance

LEX file

%{
#include "y.tab.h"
%}

%%
a return A;
b return B;
. return *yytext;
%%

YACC file

%{
#include<stdio.h>
#include "lex.yy.c"
int i=0;
%}
%token A B
%%
S: pal '\n' {i=1;}
pal:
   | A pal A {printf("my3");i=1;}
   | B pal B {printf("my4");i=1;}       
   | A {printf("my1");i=1;}
   | B {printf("my2");i=1;}         
   ;
%%
int main()
{
    printf("Enter Valid string\n");
    yyparse();
    if(i==1)
    printf("Valid");
    return 0;
}
int yyerror(char* s)
{
    printf("Invalid\n");
    return 0;
}

Example : entered string is : aba expected output should be VALID but it is giving INVALID

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  • 1
    Please add some example data with expected and actual result. – Daniel Böhmer Jan 26 '15 at 12:27
  • @Daniel Böhmer - I have edited my question . – user39495 Jan 26 '15 at 12:54
0

It is impossible to solve this problem with Yacc.

Yacc is a LALR(1) parser generator. LALR refers to a class of grammars. A grammar is a math tool to reason about parsing. One in parens refers to the lookahead - that is a max number of tokens we consider before definitely deciding which of the alternative productions (or "rules") to follow. Remember, the parsing algorithm is one pass, it can't backtrack and try another alternative as some regular expression engines do.

Concerning your palindrom problem, when a parser encounters 'a', it has to pick the right choice somehow

  • pal: A - 'a' alone is a valid palindrome all by itself, let's call it the inner core

  • pal: [A] pal A - outter layer, increasing nesting level

  • pal: A pal [A] - outter layer, decreasing nesting level

Making the right choice is impossible without infinite lookahead, but Yacc has only one token of lookahead.


The way Yacc handles this grammar is interesting as well.

If a grammar is ambiguous or not LR(1) the generated stack automata is non-deterministic. There are some builtin tools to fix it.

The first tool is priorities and associativity to deal with operators in programming languages (not relevant here).

Another one is a quirk - by default Yacc prefers "shift" to "reduce". These two are technicalities reffering to the internal operation of the parse algorithm. Basically tokens are "shift" into a stack. Once a group of tokens on the top match a rule it is possible to "reduce" them, replacing entire group with the single non-terminal from the left side of the rule.

Hence once we have 'a' at the top, we can either reduce it to a pal, or we can shift another token in assuming that a nested pal will emerge eventually. Yacc prefers the later.

The reason for this preference? The same ambiguity arrise in if-then-else statement in most languages. Consider two nested if statements but only one else clause. Yacc attaches else to the innermost if statement which seams to be the right thing to do.

Besides Yacc can generate a report highlighting issues in the grammar like shift-reduce conflicts mentioned above.

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  • 1
    Not really correct -- the grammar is not ambiguous in any way. It is non-deterministic (so no simple deterministic parser generator can deal with it), but a GLR parser (such as can be generated by bison) can deal with it just fine (albeit slowly). – Chris Dodd Jan 26 '15 at 17:02
0

In the continuation of @ChrisDod and @NickZavaritsky comments, I add a working version of the glr (bison) parser.

%option noyywrap

%%
a    return A;
b    return B;
\n   return '\n';
.    {fprintf(stderr, "Error\n"); exit(1);}
%%

and Yacc / bison

%{
#include <stdio.h>
int i=0;
%}

%token A B
%glr-parser

%%
S  : pal   '\n'   {i=1; return 1 ;}
   | error '\n'   {i=0; return 1 ;}

pal: A pal A
   | B pal B
   | A
   | B
   |
   ;
%%
#include "lex.yy.c"

int main() {
    yyparse();
    if(i==1) printf("Valid\n");
    else     printf("inValid\n");
    return 0;
}
int yyerror(char* s) { return 0; }

Some changes were introduced in the lexer: (1) \n was missing; (2) unknown chars are now fatal errors;

The error recovery error was used to obtain the "invalid palindrome" situations.

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