78

I have the following controller method:

@RequestMapping(value="/map/update", method=RequestMethod.POST, produces = "application/json; charset=utf-8")
@ResponseBody
public ResponseEntityWrapper updateMapTheme(
        HttpServletRequest request, 
        @RequestBody @Valid List<CompanyTag> categories,
        HttpServletResponse response
        ) throws ResourceNotFoundException, AuthorizationException {
...
}

CompanyTag is defined this way:

public class CompanyTag {
    @StringUUIDValidation String key;
    String value;
    String color;
    String icon;
    Icon iconObj;

    public String getKey() {
        return key;
    }

    public void setKey(String key) {
        this.key = key;
    }
   ...
}

The problem is that validation is not triggered, the CompanyTag list is not validated, the "StringUUIDValidation" validator is never called.

If I remove the List and only try to send a single CompanyTag, i.e. instead of:

@RequestBody @Valid List<CompanyTag> categories,

use:

@RequestBody @Valid CompanyTag category,

it works as expected, so apparently Spring does not like to validate lists of things (tried with array instead, that did not work either).

Anybody have any idea what's missing?

17 Answers 17

69

I found another approach that works. The basic problem is that you want to have a list as your input payload for your service, but javax.validation won't validate a list, only a JavaBean. The trick is to use a custom list class that functions as both a List and a JavaBean:

@RequestBody @Valid List<CompanyTag> categories

Change to:

@RequestBody @Valid ValidList<CompanyTag> categories

Your list subclass would look something like this:

public class ValidList<E> implements List<E> {

    @Valid
    private List<E> list;

    public ValidList() {
        this.list = new ArrayList<E>();
    }

    public ValidList(List<E> list) {
        this.list = list;
    }

    // Bean-like methods, used by javax.validation but ignored by JSON parsing

    public List<E> getList() {
        return list;
    }

    public void setList(List<E> list) {
        this.list = list;
    }

    // List-like methods, used by JSON parsing but ignored by javax.validation

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return list.size();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return list.isEmpty();
    }

    // Other list methods ...
}
8
  • 4
    This is the most elegant way I have ever found, thank you!
    – vr3C
    Jun 24, 2016 at 5:48
  • 1
    This is really a crisp solution, but have a question - how to handle validation message in this scenario ? Jul 21, 2017 at 12:58
  • did you find elegant solution on how to handle message, I tried this but its throwing ConstraintViolationException . I want to handle using spring exception advice.(@ControllerAdvice) Jan 17, 2018 at 15:35
  • 5
    It's a working solution, but isn't spring violating JSR-303 which explicitly says Lists should be validated? Collection-valued, array-valued and generally Iterable fields and properties may also be decorated with the @Valid annotation. This causes the contents of the iterator to be validated. Any object implementing java.lang.Iterable is supported. This includes specifically: • arrays of objects • java.util.Collection • java.util.Set • java.util.List • java.util.Map (special treatment see below) beanvalidation.org/1.0/spec/…
    – gnomed
    Sep 10, 2018 at 21:45
  • 6
    ValidList is supposed to @Override all of the List methods? Talking about boilerplate code... Feb 18, 2019 at 18:49
57

1 TL;DR

I tried to use Paul's method in my project, but some people said it's too complex. Not long after that, I find another easy way which works like code below:

@Validated
@RestController
@RequestMapping("/parent")
public class ParentController {

  private FatherRepository fatherRepository;

  /**
   * DI
   */
  public ParentController(FatherRepository fatherRepository) {
    this.fatherRepository = fatherRepository;
  }

  @PostMapping("/test")
  public void test(@RequestBody @Valid List<Father> fathers) {

  }
}

It works and easy to use. The key point is the @Valiated annotation on the class. Btw, it's springBootVersion = '2.0.4.RELEASE' that I use.

2 Exception handling

As discussed in comments, exceptions can be handled like code below:

@RestControllerAdvice
@Component
public class ControllerExceptionHandler {

  /**
   * handle controller methods parameter validation exceptions
   *
   * @param exception ex
   * @return wrapped result
   */
  @ExceptionHandler
  @ResponseBody
  @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.OK)
  public DataContainer handle(ConstraintViolationException exception) {

    Set<ConstraintViolation<?>> violations = exception.getConstraintViolations();
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (ConstraintViolation<?> violation : violations) {
      builder.append(violation.getMessage());
      break;
    }
    DataContainer container = new DataContainer(CommonCode.PARAMETER_ERROR_CODE, builder.toString());
    return container;
  }
}

Taking http status code as representing network is ok and only first violation message is returned here. You may change it to satisfy customized requirements.

3 How it works (code part)

With @Validated on class level, parameters of methods are validated by what called method-level validation in spring boot, which is not only worked for controllers, but any bean the IOC container managed.

By the way, the methods in method level validation (short as validation A) is enhanced by

  • org.springframework.validation.beanvalidation.MethodValidationInterceptor

while the typical spring boot controller methods validation (short as validation B) is processed in

  • org.springframework.web.servlet.mvc.method.annotation.RequestResponseBodyMethodProcessor

Both of them lead the actual validation operation to org.hibernate.validator.internal.engine.ValidatorImpl by default, but the methods they call are different, which leads to the differences in validation logic.

  • MethodValidationInterceptor call validateParameters method in ValidatorImpl
  • RequestResponseBodyMethodProcessor call validate method in ValidatorImpl

They are different methods with different functions, so lead to different results in validation A/B, the typical point is the validation of list object:

  • A triggers constraint check on element of collection object while B not

4 How it works (specification part)

The JSR-303 defines functions of the methods we discussed above.

validate method is explained in the validation method part, and the implementation must obey the logic defined in validation routine, in which it states that it will execute all the constraint validation for all reachable fields of the object, this is why element of List object (or other collection instance) cannot be validated via this method - the elements of the collection are not fields of the collection instance.

But validateParameters, JSR-303 actually doesn't treat it as main topic and put it in Appendix C. Proposal for method-level validation. It provides some description:

The constraints declarations evaluated are the constraints hosted on the parameters of the method or constructor. If @Valid is placed on a parameter, constraints declared on the object itself are considered.

validateReturnedValue evaluates the constraints hosted on the method itself. If @Valid is placed on the method, the constraints declared on the object itself are considered.

public @NotNull String saveItem(@Valid @NotNull Item item, @Max(23) BigDecimal price)

In the previous example,

- item is validated against @NotNull and all the constraints it hosts
- price is validated against @Max(23)
- the result of saveItem is validated against @NotNull

and exclaim that Bean Validation providers are free to implement this proposal as a specific extension. As far as I know, the Hibernate Validation project implements this method, makes constraints works on the object itself, and element of collection object.

5 Some complain

I don't know why the spring framework guys call validate in RequestResponseBodyMethodProcessor, makes lots of related questions appeare in stackoverflow. Maybe it's just because http post body data usually is a form data, and can be represented by a java bean naturally. If it's me, I'll call the validateParametes in RequestResponseBodyMethodProcessor for easy use.

8
  • 2
    This will mean your rest controller itself will throw an exception rather than returning an appropriate 400 response though. Mar 11, 2019 at 11:25
  • This is an easy implementation fix and you can use it in conjunction with @ControllerAdvice and a GlobalExceptionHandler to catch the controller throwing the exception itself as Sebeastiann mentioned. Catching ConstraintViolationException allowed me to pretty up the return message to user and send back Status 400.
    – Encryption
    May 22, 2019 at 15:58
  • @Encryption Wise suggestion, I use a HandlerExceptionResolver to handle it.
    – Lebecca
    May 23, 2019 at 1:29
  • May work in Spring Boot 2 but doesn't work in Spring Boot 1.5.x Jun 25, 2019 at 4:30
  • @GameSalutes Sorry to hear that, I test with Spring boot 1.5.0.RELEASE and it works fine, but exceptions needed to be handled carefully.
    – Lebecca
    Jun 25, 2019 at 13:12
21

@Paul Strack's great solution mixed with Lombok magic:

@Data
public class ValidList<E> implements List<E> {
    @Valid
    @Delegate
    private List<E> list = new ArrayList<>();
}

Usage (swap List for ValidList):

public ResponseEntityWrapper updateMapTheme(
        @RequestBody @Valid ValidList<CompanyTag> categories, ...)

(Needs Lombok, but if you don't use it already you really want to try it out)

4
  • 5
    The Lombok addition is a nice touch and works great. Didn't even know about @Delegate. Simplest workaround answer for what I would call a Spring bug that still exists on the SpringBoot 1.5.x release track. Jun 25, 2019 at 4:39
  • I am always getting the following error: org.hibernate.AnnotationException: ValidList collection type not supported for property: MyClass.attribute Any ideas?
    – Alwin07
    Aug 22, 2021 at 17:39
  • Best answer. You rock.
    – etech
    Dec 9, 2021 at 22:55
  • Also, if you want to validate @NotEmpty on the list, just put the @NotEmpty annotation on the inner List<E> list property.
    – etech
    Dec 9, 2021 at 23:22
14

I would suggest to wrap your List categories into some DTO bean and validate it. Beside of working validation you will benefit from more flexible API.

@RequestMapping(value="/map/update", method=RequestMethod.POST, produces = "application/json; charset=utf-8")
@ResponseBody
public ResponseEntityWrapper updateMapTheme(
    HttpServletRequest request, 
    @RequestBody @Valid TagRequest tagRequest,
    HttpServletResponse response
    ) throws ResourceNotFoundException, AuthorizationException {
...
}

public static class TagRequest {
    @Valid
    List<CompanyTag> categories;    
    // Gettes setters
}
3
  • 2
    That is what i did (with generics to make it, well, generic), but this is a workaround and I'm wondering if Spring, being a relatively active framework which is constantly developed and improved, has not solved this issue already in a way I'm not familiar with.
    – TheZuck
    Jan 26, 2015 at 14:48
  • Basically this is not a Spring issue but a Bean Validation JSR implementation limitation. Which is in this case Hibernate Validator. And more over as the name for JSR tells us this is a "Bean Validation" not an "Object Validation" . You want to validate a List which is not a Java Bean. So I think the implementation accepts a bean object with getters and setters and then just validates the properties, but List is not the case.
    – Babl
    Jan 26, 2015 at 15:46
  • 7
    Please note that you have to change the format of JSON from [{},{}] to {categories: [{},{}]}
    – Kacper86
    Nov 30, 2015 at 12:52
14

Using Spring Boot 2.4.1:

  1. Add the @Validated annotation to the class

  2. Move the @Valid annotation inside the diamond operator:

    @RestController
    @Validated          // <-- This activates the Spring Validation AOP interceptor
    public class MyController {
    
      ...
          @RequestBody List<@Valid CompanyTag> categories
                           // ^^^ - NOTE: the @Valid annotation is inside <> brackets
    
5
  • 2
    this returns a 500 instead of expected 400 Http code
    – Sayantan
    Dec 15, 2021 at 7:47
  • @Sayantan the default status code returned by this is 400: if you are getting 500 then it must be because of some other issue in your code Dec 21, 2021 at 10:34
  • You need to be more specific as to what qualifies as an "issue" in code. I am quite certain about it as I tried multiple times as this would have been a quick fix. However, I had to eventually change to ValidatedList as depicted here stackoverflow.com/a/36313615/3950849 and then it returns a 400. I was using spring boot 2.4.5, you can try it out yourself if you would like.
    – Sayantan
    Jan 5 at 6:08
  • Thanks, this helped me with wrapper types @Valid List<@Size(max=50) String> myList Feb 17 at 15:28
  • Any idea why I get JSR-303 validated property 'items[19]' does not have a corresponding accessor for Spring data binding - check your DataBinder's configuration (bean property versus direct field access) error when using this approach?
    – basarito
    Jul 21 at 10:08
6

I think the most elegant solution is to create a custom Validator for Collection and a @ControllerAdvice that registers that Validator in the WebDataBinders, take a look to Spring validation for RequestBody parameters bound to collections in Controller methods

1
4

Validating a collection does not work directly.

For example: what should it do if multiple elements fail the validation? Stop after first validation? Validate all (if so what is to be done with the collection of messages)?

If in your configuration Spring delegates to a Bean Validator provider like Hibernate Validator, you should look up for ways of implementing a collection validator there.

For Hibernate, a similar problem is discussed here

4

use @Validated annotate controller
use @Valid annotate @RequestBody

0
4

The @Valid annotation can be used inside the diamond operator:

private List<@Valid MyType> types;

or

@Valid
private List<MyType> types;

Now, every list item will be validated.

3
  • Question is about collection parameter in controller method. Tl;DR doesn't work there.
    – zeratul021
    Mar 12, 2020 at 23:14
  • 1
    @Hamid's first example is perfect when validating a value based on an enum. Note that the validator should include TYPE_USER in the @Target({ TYPE, FIELD, ANNOTATION_TYPE, PARAMETER, TYPE_USE }) annotation to support this type of in-line validator
    – Dana
    Feb 24, 2021 at 19:18
  • this still won't work until you have @Validated on the controller class itself and additionally, this returns a 500 and not the expected 400 Http Code
    – Sayantan
    Dec 15, 2021 at 7:59
4

Here's my attempt to reconcile the many different answers.

Lebecca's answer works without the need for a wrapper, as Paul's answer requires, because @Validated placed on the class enables the method validation feature of the Bean Validation API.

The Hibernate Validator documentation specifically explains:

[...] the @Valid annotation can be used to mark executable parameters and return values for cascaded validation.

[...]

Cascaded validation can not only be applied to simple object references but also to collection-typed parameters and return values. This means when putting the @Valid annotation to a parameter or return value which

  • is an array

  • implements java.lang.Iterable

  • or implements java.util.Map

each contained element gets validated.

If you need to validate a collection of Beans, this is the most convenient way (make sure to also implement an @ExceptionHandler as required).

If you need to validate a collection of Non-Beans, e.g. a List<String> where each element must match a pattern, you can use container element constraints like this:

controllerMethod(List<@Pattern(regexp="pattern") String> strings)

There's also the possibility to only use @Valid on a controller method parameter (which must then be a Bean type) without also placing @Validated on the class. In that case, you get an appropriate, detailed HTTP 400 response "for free", i.e. without the need for a custom @ExceptionHandler. But this doesn't apply the cascading validation, so you cannot validate something like @Valid List<SomeBean> beans, nor does it support container element constraints.

And finally, you can combine the latter approach with an extra parameter added to the method of type BindingResult. This won't trigger an automatic error response in the case of a validation error, but instead you must inspect the injected BindingResult yourself in the method body and act accordingly (which allows for more flexibility). That is described in this comprehensive answer.

3

I'm using spring-boot 1.5.19.RELEASE

I annotate my service with @validated and then apply @Valid to the List parameter in the method and items in my list get validated.

Model

@Data
@ApiModel
@Validated
public class SubscriptionRequest {
    @NotBlank()
    private String soldToBpn;

    @NotNull
    @Size(min = 1)
    @Valid
    private ArrayList<DataProducts> dataProducts;

    private String country;

    @NotNull
    @Size(min = 1)
    @Valid
    private ArrayList<Contact> contacts;
}

Service Interface (or use on concrete type if no interface)

@Validated
public interface SubscriptionService {
    List<SubscriptionCreateResult> addSubscriptions(@NonNull @Size(min = 1) @Valid List<SubscriptionRequest> subscriptionRequestList)
        throws IOException;
}

Global Exception Handler method (ApiError Type is not my design)

@ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST)
@ExceptionHandler(value = ConstraintViolationException.class)
@ResponseBody
public ApiError[] handleConstraintViolationException(ConstraintViolationException exception) {
    List<InvalidField> invalidFields = exception.getConstraintViolations().stream()
        .map(constraintViolation -> new InvalidField(constraintViolation.getPropertyPath().toString(),
                                                     constraintViolation.getMessage(),
                                                     constraintViolation.getInvalidValue()))
        .collect(Collectors.toList());
    return new ApiError[] {new ApiError(ErrorCodes.INVALID_PARAMETER, "Validation Error", invalidFields)};
}

example bad method call from a controller

 LinkedList<SubscriptionRequest> list = new LinkedList<>();
 list.add(new SubscriptionRequest());
 return subscriptionService.addSubscriptions(list);

Response body (note the index [0])

[
    {
        "errorCode": "invalid.parameter",
        "errorMessage": "Validation Error",
        "invalidFields": [
            {
                "name": "addSubscriptions.arg0[0].soldToBpn",
                "message": "may not be empty",
                "value": null
            },
            {
                "name": "addSubscriptions.arg0[0].dataProducts",
                "message": "may not be null",
                "value": null
            },
            {
                "name": "addSubscriptions.arg0[0].contacts",
                "message": "may not be null",
                "value": null
            }
        ]
    }
]
3

I did the below steps to make validation work on lists:

  1. Annotate the rest controller with @Validated at the class level
  2. Add @Valid before the generic type in the list, i.e List<@Valid MyClass>

Also, found that if the validation failed I got javax.validation.ConstraintViolationException

2

With the later versions of spring you can now do this.

@RequestMapping(value="/map/update", method=RequestMethod.POST, produces = "application/json; charset=utf-8")
@ResponseBody
public ResponseEntityWrapper updateMapTheme(
        HttpServletRequest request, 
        @RequestBody List<@Valid CompanyTag> categories,
        HttpServletResponse response
        ) throws ResourceNotFoundException, AuthorizationException {
...
}

the @Valid annotation is in the generic param.

If you are using a custom javax validation annotation, make sure to add TYPE_USE to the annotation targe

@Target({ ElementType.TYPE_USE})
public @interface ValidationAnnotation {.. }
1

create entity class:

import javax.validation.Valid;
import java.util.List;

public class ValidList<E> {

    @Valid
    private List<E> list;

    public List<E> getList() {
        return list;
    }

    public void setList(List<E> list) {
        this.list = list;
    }
}

use Controller

    @RequestMapping(value = "/sku", method = RequestMethod.POST)
    public JsonResult createSKU(@Valid @RequestBody ValidList<Entity> entityList, BindingResult bindingResult) {
        if (bindingResult.hasErrors())
            return ErrorTools.build().handlerError(bindingResult);
        return new JsonResult(200, "result");
    }
1
  • 1
    Never mix DTO and Entity. Always separate both with at least a service layer.
    – Vincent
    Apr 16, 2020 at 9:07
1

For those using spring boot (I was using 2.6.7), what worked for me was adding the spring-boot-starter-validation dependency:

org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-validation
0

(this answer is in Kotlin, for Java see https://stackoverflow.com/a/64061936)

For those using kotlin and jackson, here is the ValidatedList class that do not require wrapping, that is, it will still be serialized/deserialized as a usual list:

class ValidatedList<E> {
    /**
     * By default, spring-boot cannot validate lists, as they are generic AND do not conform to the Java Bean definition.
     * This is one work-around: create a wrapper that fits the Java Bean definition, and use Jackson annotations to
     * make the wrapper disappear upon (de)serialization.
     * Do not change anything (such as making the _value field private) or it won't work anymore !
     * 
     * Usage:
     * ```
     * @PostMapping("/something")
     * fun someRestControllerMethod(@Valid @RequestBody pojoList: ValidatedList<SomePOJOClass>){
     *     // access list with:
     *     pojoList.values
     *}
     * ```
     */

    @JsonValue
    @Valid
    @NotNull
    @Size(min = 1, message = "array body must contain at least one item.")
    var _values: List<E>? = null

    val values: List<E>
        get() = _values!!

    @JsonCreator
    constructor(vararg list: E) {
        this._values = list.asList()
    }
}

Advantages:

  • no need for the @Validated annotation
  • will throw an error if the body is an empty array (see @Size)
  • the exception will be mapped correctly to 400 Bad Request (which is not the case when using javax and @Validated annotation)

Example:

data class N(
    @field:Min(value = 0, message = "id must be positive.")
    val id: Long? = null,

    @field:NotNull
    @field:Size(min = 2, max = 32, message = "wrong size: should be 32 chars long.")
    val token: String? = null
)
@RestController
class XController {
    @PostMapping("/ns")
    fun getNs(@Valid @NotNull @RequestBody wrap: ListWrapper<N>) = wrap
}

Submit ok:

 curl -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST http://localhost:8080/ns -d '[{"id": 11, "token": "something"}]'
[{"id" : 11, "token" : "something"}]

Submit empty body:

curl -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST http://localhost:8080/ns -d '[]'
{
   "timestamp" : "2020-09-25T08:49:30.324+00:00",
   "message" : "Validation failed for object='listWrapper'. Error count: 1",
   "error" : "Bad Request",
   "path" : "/ns",
   "status" : 400,
   "exception" : "org.springframework.web.bind.MethodArgumentNotValidException",
   "trace":"org.springframework.web.bind.MethodArgumentNotValidException: Validation failed for argument [0] in public com.example.demo.test.XController$ListWrapper<com.example.demo.test.XController$N> com.example.demo.test.XController.getNs(com.example.demo.test.XController$ListWrapper<com.example.demo.test.XController$N>): [Field error in object 'listWrapper' on field '_values': rejected value [[]]; codes [Size.listWrapper._values,Size._values,Size.java.util.List,Size]; [...]"
}

Submit invalid items:

curl -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST http://localhost:8080/ns -d '[{"id": -11, "token": ""}]'
{
   "message" : "Validation failed for object='listWrapper'. Error count: 2",
   "path" : "/ns",
   "exception" : "org.springframework.web.bind.MethodArgumentNotValidException",
   "timestamp" : "2020-09-25T08:49:54.505+00:00",
   "error" : "Bad Request",
   "status" : 400,
   "trace":"org.springframework.web.bind.MethodArgumentNotValidException: Validation failed for argument [0] in public com.example.demo.test.XController$ListWrapper<com.example.demo.test.XController$N> com.example.demo.test.XController.getNs(com.example.demo.test.XController$ListWrapper<com.example.demo.test.XController$N>) with 2 errors: [...]"
}
0

With the Spring Boot 2.2.2 version...

Here's the piece of code:-

import java.util.List;
import javax.validation.Valid;
import javax.validation.constraints.NotBlank;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
@Validated
public class MyController {
    
    @PostMapping(value = "/test", consumes = "application/json", produces = "application/json")
    public String test(@Valid @RequestBody List<Student> st) {
        System.out.println("-------------test Method-------");
        return "Its' Success";
    }
}

class Student{
    
    @NotBlank
    String name;
    @NotBlank
    String password;
    @NotBlank
    String email;
    
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }
    public void setPassword(String password) {
        this.password = password;
    }
    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }
    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }
}

List of JSON Data:-

Notice name is blank in the second Student object.

[
  {
        "name": "Sreepad",
        "password": "sddwh",
        "email": "sample@gmail.oom"
    },
    {
        "name": "",
        "password": "sddwh",
        "email": "sample@gmail.oom"
    }
]

Error Description:-

javax.validation.ConstraintViolationException: test.st[1].name: must not be blank.

Note: List and String won't be validated at method parameter level if you remove @Validated at Class level.

SpringBoot doc says:-

17. Validation

The method validation feature supported by Bean Validation 1.1 is automatically enabled as long as a JSR-303 implementation (such as Hibernate validator) is on the classpath. This lets bean methods be annotated with javax.validation constraints on their parameters and/or on their return value. Target classes with such annotated methods need to be annotated with the @Validated annotation at the type level for their methods to be searched for inline constraint annotations.

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