128

I have a super class that is the parent (Entity) for many subclass (Customer, Product, ProductCategory...)

I'm looking to clone dynamically an object that contains different sub objects in Typescript.

In example : a Customer that has different Product who has a ProductCategory

var cust:Customer  = new Customer ();

cust.name = "someName";
cust.products.push(new Product(someId1));
cust.products.push(new Product(someId2));

In order to clone the whole tree of object I created a function in Entity

public clone():any {
    var cloneObj = new this.constructor();
    for (var attribut in this) {
        if(typeof this[attribut] === "object"){
           cloneObj[attribut] = this.clone();
        } else {
           cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut];
        }
    }
    return cloneObj;
}

The new rises the following error when it is transpiled to javascript: error TS2351: Cannot use 'new' with an expression whose type lacks a call or construct signature.

Although the script works, I would like to get rid of the transpiled error

19 Answers 19

184

Solving The Specific Issue

You can use a type assertion to tell the compiler that you know better:

public clone(): any {
    var cloneObj = new (<any>this.constructor());
    for (var attribut in this) {
        if (typeof this[attribut] === "object") {
            cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut].clone();
        } else {
            cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut];
        }
    }
    return cloneObj;
}

Cloning

Bear in mind that sometimes it is better to write your own mapping - rather than being totally dynamic. However, there are a few "cloning" tricks you can use that give you difference effects.

I will use the following code for all the subsequent examples:

class Example {
  constructor(public type: string) {

  }
}

class Customer {
  constructor(public name: string, public example: Example) {

  }

  greet() {
    return 'Hello ' + this.name;
  }
}

var customer = new Customer('David', new Example('DavidType'));

Option 1: Spread

Properties: Yes
Methods: No
Deep Copy: No

var clone = { ...customer };

alert(clone.name + ' ' + clone.example.type); // David DavidType
//alert(clone.greet()); // Not OK

clone.name = 'Steve';
clone.example.type = 'SteveType';

alert(customer.name + ' ' + customer.example.type); // David SteveType

Option 2: Object.assign

Properties: Yes
Methods: No
Deep Copy: No

var clone = Object.assign({}, customer);

alert(clone.name + ' ' + clone.example.type); // David DavidType
alert(clone.greet()); // Not OK, although compiler won't spot it

clone.name = 'Steve';
clone.example.type = 'SteveType';

alert(customer.name + ' ' + customer.example.type); // David SteveType

Option 3: Object.create

Properties: Yes
Methods: Yes
Deep Copy: No

var clone = Object.create(customer);

alert(clone.name + ' ' + clone.example.type); // David DavidType
alert(clone.greet()); // OK

clone.name = 'Steve';
clone.example.type = 'SteveType';

alert(customer.name + ' ' + customer.example.type); // David SteveType

Option 4: Deep Copy Function

Properties: Yes
Methods: No
Deep Copy: Yes

function deepCopy(obj) {
    var copy;

    // Handle the 3 simple types, and null or undefined
    if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;

    // Handle Date
    if (obj instanceof Date) {
        copy = new Date();
        copy.setTime(obj.getTime());
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Array
    if (obj instanceof Array) {
        copy = [];
        for (var i = 0, len = obj.length; i < len; i++) {
            copy[i] = deepCopy(obj[i]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Object
    if (obj instanceof Object) {
        copy = {};
        for (var attr in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = deepCopy(obj[attr]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    throw new Error("Unable to copy obj! Its type isn't supported.");
}

var clone = <Customer>deepCopy(customer);

alert(clone.name + ' ' + clone.example.type); // David DavidType
// alert(clone.greet()); // Not OK - not really a customer

clone.name = 'Steve';
clone.example.type = 'SteveType';

alert(customer.name + ' ' + customer.example.type); // David DavidType
  • Close, the transpile stopped complainning with typescript 1.3, but once in javascript it would throw error. Typescript 1.4.1, won't let it go. – David Laberge Feb 5 '15 at 18:16
  • You could use generics to get back a result of the same type you are cloning. – robmcm Nov 29 '16 at 12:36
  • 1
    Would you be abel to clarify how do you exactly use this? I included as a method of my object and then got an error saying is not a function... – megalucio Apr 26 '17 at 0:35
  • 1
    I am getting the following error: "ERROR TypeError: this.constructor(...) is not a constructor" – michali Jun 11 '17 at 7:31
  • 1
    Did you just make a public example out of that customer? – Blair Connolly Jul 30 at 17:53
151

1.Use spread operator

const obj1 = { param: "value" };
const obj2 = { ...obj1 };

Spread operator takes all fields from obj1 and spread them over obj2. In the result you get new object with new reference and the same fields as original one.

Remember that it is shallow copy, it means that if object is nested then its nested composite params will exists in the new object by the same reference.

2.Object.assign()

const obj1={ param: "value" };
const obj2:any = Object.assign({}, obj1);

Object.assign create real copy, but only own properties, so properties in prototype will not exist in copied object. It is also shallow copy.


3.Object.create()

const obj1={ param: "value" };
const obj2:any = Object.create(obj1);

Object.create is not doing real cloning, it is creating object from prototype. So use it if the object should clone primary type properties, because primary type properties assignment is not done by reference.

Pluses of Object.create are that any functions declared in prototype will be available in our newly created object.


Few things about shallow copy

Shallow copy puts into new object all fields of the old one, but it also means that if original object has composite type fields (object, arrays etc.) then those fields are put in new object with the same references. Mutation such field in original object will be reflected in new object.

It maybe looks like a pitfall, but really situation when the whole complex object needs to be copied is rare. Shallow copy will re-use most of memory which means that is very cheap in comparison to deep copy.


Deep copy

Spread operator can be handy for deep copy.

const obj1 = { param: "value", complex: { name: "John"}}
const obj2 = { ...obj1, complex: {...obj1.complex}};

Above code created deep copy of obj1. Composite field "complex" was also copied into obj2. Mutation field "complex" will not reflect the copy.

  • 5
    I don't think that's completely correct. Object.create(obj1) creates a new object and assigns obj1 as the prototype. None of the fields in obj1 are copied or cloned. So changes on obj1 without modifying obj2 will be seen, since it essentially has no properties. If you modify obj2 first, the prototype will not be seen for the field you define since obj2's field with the name is closer in the hierarchy. – Ken Rimple Sep 16 '16 at 19:08
  • 2
    You'll also see ES2015 and typescript developers doing this instead, which creates an object from the 1st parameter (in my case an empty one) and copies the properties from the second and subsequent params): let b = Object.assign({}, a); – Ken Rimple Sep 16 '16 at 19:12
  • @KenRimple You are in 100% right, I added some more information. – Maciej Sikora Sep 19 '16 at 11:47
  • 5
    Object.assign will create issues for deep objects. For example {name: 'x', values: ['a','b','c']}. After using Object.assign to clone, both objects share the values array so updating one affects the other. See: developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… ('Warning for Deep Clone' section). It says: For deep cloning, we need to use other alternatives. This is because Object.assign() copies the property reference when the property being assigned is an object. – Meir Dec 8 '16 at 8:42
37

Try this:

let copy = (JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(objectToCopy)));

It is a good solution until you are using very large objects or your object has unserializable properties.

In order to preserve type safety you could use a copy function in the class you want to make copies from:

getCopy(): YourClassName{
    return (JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(this)));
}

or in a static way:

static createCopy(objectToCopy: YourClassName): YourClassName{
    return (JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(objectToCopy)));
}
  • 2
    This is ok, but you should keep in mind you'll lose prototype information and all types not supported in json when serialize/parse. – Stanislav E. Govorov Mar 27 '17 at 9:04
  • Also this seems less efficient comparing to the deepCopy function provided above. – Mojtaba Nov 8 '18 at 11:37
  • I have this error: "Converting circular structure to JSON" when I use "(JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(objectToCopy)));" – Cedric Arnould Mar 6 at 15:02
25

Typescript/Javascript has its own operator for shallow cloning:

let shallowClone = { ...original };
14

It's easy to get a shallow copy with "Object Spread" introduced in TypeScript 2.1

this TypeScript: let copy = { ...original };

produces this JavaScript:

var __assign = (this && this.__assign) || Object.assign || function(t) {
    for (var s, i = 1, n = arguments.length; i < n; i++) {
        s = arguments[i];
        for (var p in s) if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(s, p))
            t[p] = s[p];
    }
    return t;
};
var copy = __assign({}, original);

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/release-notes/typescript-2-1.html

  • 2
    Note: this will create a shallow copy – Jimmy Kane Jun 9 '17 at 19:30
6

For serializable deep clone, with Type Information is,

export function clone<T>(a: T): T {
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(a));
}
5

You can also have something like this:

class Entity {
    id: number;

    constructor(id: number) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    clone(): this {
        return new (this.constructor as typeof Entity)(this.id) as this;
    }
}

class Customer extends Entity {
    name: string;

    constructor(id: number, name: string) {
        super(id);
        this.name = name;
    }

    clone(): this {
        return new (this.constructor as typeof Customer)(this.id, this.name) as this;
    }
}

Just make sure that you override the clone method in all Entity subclasses otherwise you'll end up with partial clones.

The return type of this will always match the type of the instance.

4

My take on it:

Object.assign(...) only copies properties and we lose the prototype and methods.

Object.create(...) is not copying properties for me and just creating a prototype.

What worked for me is creating a prototype using Object.create(...) and copying properties to it using Object.assign(...):

So for an object foo, make clone like this:

Object.assign(Object.create(foo), foo)
3

If you get this error:

TypeError: this.constructor(...) is not a function

This is the correct script:

public clone(): any {
    var cloneObj = new (<any>this.constructor)(); // line fixed
    for (var attribut in this) {
        if (typeof this[attribut] === "object") {
            cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut].clone();
        } else {
            cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut];
        }
    }
    return cloneObj;
}
  • 4
    Is correctcloneObj[attribut] = this.clone();? or you mean cloneObj[attribut] = this[attribut].clone(); – Serginho Jan 16 '17 at 15:58
2

Came across this problem myself and in the end wrote a small library cloneable-ts that provides an abstract class, which adds a clone method to any class extending it. The abstract class borrows the Deep Copy Function described in the accepted answer by Fenton only replacing copy = {}; with copy = Object.create(originalObj) to preserve the class of the original object. Here is an example of using the class.

import {Cloneable, CloneableArgs} from 'cloneable-ts';

// Interface that will be used as named arguments to initialize and clone an object
interface PersonArgs {
    readonly name: string;
    readonly age: number;
}

// Cloneable abstract class initializes the object with super method and adds the clone method
// CloneableArgs interface ensures that all properties defined in the argument interface are defined in class
class Person extends Cloneable<TestArgs>  implements CloneableArgs<PersonArgs> {
    readonly name: string;
    readonly age: number;

    constructor(args: TestArgs) {
        super(args);
    }
}

const a = new Person({name: 'Alice', age: 28});
const b = a.clone({name: 'Bob'})
a.name // Alice
b.name // Bob
b.age // 28

Or you could just use the Cloneable.clone helper method:

import {Cloneable} from 'cloneable-ts';

interface Person {
    readonly name: string;
    readonly age: number;
}

const a: Person = {name: 'Alice', age: 28};
const b = Cloneable.clone(a, {name: 'Bob'})
a.name // Alice
b.name // Bob
b.age // 28    
1

For a simple clone of the hole object's content, I simply stringify and parse the instance :

let cloneObject = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(objectToClone))

Whereas I change data in objectToClone tree, there is no change in cloneObject. That was my requierement.

Hope it help

1

Here is my mash-up! And here is a StackBlitz link to it. Its currently limited to only copying simple types and object types but could be modified easily I would think.

   let deepClone = <T>(source: T): { [k: string]: any } => {
      let results: { [k: string]: any } = {};
      for (let P in source) {
        if (typeof source[P] === 'object') {
          results[P] = deepClone(source[P]);
        } else {
          results[P] = source[P];
        }
      }
      return results;
    };
  • Works pretty well as far as I can see. However, typeof null is also an object, so the query should be if (source[P] !== null && typeof source[P] === 'object') instead. Otherwise your null values will get turned into an empty object. – MortenMoulder May 9 at 8:48
1

Add "lodash.clonedeep": "^4.5.0" to your package.json. Then use like this:

import * as _ from 'lodash';

...

const copy = _.cloneDeep(original)
0

I ended up doing:

public clone(): any {
  const result = new (<any>this.constructor);

  // some deserialization code I hade in place already...
  // which deep copies all serialized properties of the
  // object graph
  // result.deserialize(this)

  // you could use any of the usggestions in the other answers to
  // copy over all the desired fields / properties

  return result;
}

Because:

var cloneObj = new (<any>this.constructor());

from @Fenton gave runtime errors.

Typescript version: 2.4.2

0

How about good old jQuery?! Here is deep clone:

var clone = $.extend(true, {}, sourceObject);
  • Any explanation of down-voting please? Except of that it is best solution. – alehro Apr 11 at 15:46
  • This question wasn't tagged JQuery nor was JQuery mentioned in the question. It also would be massive overhead to include JQuery in a project just to do a deep clone. – LewisM Apr 14 at 17:41
  • Really strange reason for down-voting. It was never bad to suggest solution from some library especially well-known one. I am sure that people are able to decide if they need to include the library or not. All projects in my company do include jQuery anyway. Despite that we use latest Angular. So, it feels more likely that down-vote has done out of hate to jQuery and to offer excuses for several pages of answers reinventing the wheel. – alehro Apr 15 at 13:44
  • I actually came to the question not to answer it, but looking for answer. And I was very disappointed that there is still no better solution. – alehro Apr 15 at 13:51
  • That's fair enough, but the OP isn't about how to clone, it is about identifying an issue in the code he provided and you responded with the jQuery way of cloning without really answering the question. I'm not the one who downvoted you, but I believe that may be why you were downvoted. – LewisM Apr 16 at 8:37
0

I took a stab at creating a generic copy/clone service that retains types for nested objects. Would love feedback if i'm doing something wrong, but it seems to work so far...

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';

@Injectable()
export class CopyService {

  public deepCopy<T>(objectToClone: T): T {
    // If it's a simple type or null, just return it.
    if (typeof objectToClone === 'string' ||
      typeof objectToClone === 'number' ||
      typeof objectToClone === 'undefined' ||
      typeof objectToClone === 'symbol' ||
      typeof objectToClone === 'function' ||
      typeof objectToClone === 'boolean' ||
      objectToClone === null
    ) {
      return objectToClone;
    }

    // Otherwise, check if it has a constructor we can use to properly instantiate it...
    let ctor = Object.getPrototypeOf(objectToClone).constructor;
    if (ctor) {
      let clone = new ctor();

      // Once we've instantiated the correct type, assign the child properties with deep copies of the values
      Object.keys(objectToClone).forEach(key => {
        if (Array.isArray(objectToClone[key]))
          clone[key] = objectToClone[key].map(item => this.deepCopy(item));
        else
          clone[key] = this.deepCopy(objectToClone[key]);
      });

      if (JSON.stringify(objectToClone) !== JSON.stringify(clone))
        console.warn('object cloned, but doesnt match exactly...\nobject: ' + JSON.stringify(objectToClone) + "\nclone: " + JSON.stringify(clone))

      // return our cloned object...
      return clone;
    }
    else {
      //not sure this will ever get hit, but figured I'd have a catch call.
      console.log('deep copy found something it didnt know: ' + JSON.stringify(objectToClone));
      return objectToClone;
    }
  }
}
0
  public clone(toClone: any): any {
    const newClone = {};
    for (const attribut in toClone) {
      if (typeof toClone[attribut] === 'object') {
        newClone[attribut] = this.clone(toClone[attribut]);
      } else {
        newClone[attribut] = toClone[attribut];
      }
    }
    return newClone;
  }
0

In typeScript I test with angular, and it's doing OK

deepCopy(obj) {


        var copy;

        // Handle the 3 simple types, and null or undefined
        if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;

        // Handle Date
        if (obj instanceof Date) {
            copy = new Date();
            copy.setTime(obj.getTime());
            return copy;
        }

        // Handle Array
        if (obj instanceof Array) {
            copy = [];
            for (var i = 0, len = obj.length; i < len; i++) {
                copy[i] = this.deepCopy(obj[i]);
            }
            return copy;
        }

        // Handle Object
        if (obj instanceof Object) {
            copy = {};
            for (var attr in obj) {
                if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = this.deepCopy(obj[attr]);
            }
            return copy;
        }

        throw new Error("Unable to copy obj! Its type isn't supported.");
    }
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-1

If you already have the target object, so you don't want to create it anew (like if updating an array) you must copy the properties.
If have done it this way:

Object.keys(source).forEach((key) => {
    copy[key] = source[key]
})

Praise is due. (look at headline "version 2")

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