3

Consider the following Bacon.js code sample (loosely based on the code here, uses bacon.model & bacon.jquery):

<input id="total" type="text" placeholder="total">
/
<input id="quantity" type="text" placeholder="quantity" value="1">
=
<span id="price"></span>
<script>

  var $total = Bacon.$.textFieldValue($("#total")).changes();

  var quantity = Bacon.$.textFieldValue($("#quantity"));

  var price = Bacon.when(
    [$total, quantity], function(x,y) { return x/y; }
  ).toProperty(0);

  price.onValue(function (p) {
    $('#price').text(p);
  });

</script>

What happens here is that the stream $total and the property quantity are joined into a property price. Both $total and quantity get their input from a text input field, but only $total prompts price to be updated. (I.e. quantity is sampled but not part of the synchronization pattern.)

I am trying to achieve this same behavior using RxJS instead of Bacon.js, but all I can come up with is super ugly solutions. I reckon I must be overlooking something…?

My best shot so far (behavior not identical, but you get the idea):

var totalChange = Rx.Observable.fromEvent($('#total'), 'input');

var totalValue = totalChange.map(function () {
  return parseInt($('#total').val(), 10);
});
var quantityValue = totalChange.map(function () {
  return parseInt($('#quantity').val(), 10);
});

var price = Rx.Observable.zip(
  totalValue,
  quantityValue,
  function (x,y) {
    return x/y;
  }
);

price.subscribe(function (p) {
  $('#price').text(p);
});

Because neither combineLatest or zip offer the desired behavior on observables that represent the two text fields directly, all I can think of is to create an observable for quantity based on input events in the text field for total. Which works, but it feels pretty far-fetched.

Any suggestions for alternative approaches?

6

Use the recently added withLatestFrom instead of combineLatest.

var price = totalValue.withLatestFrom(quantityValue, (x,y) => x/y);

Compare their diagrams:

  • Oooo... I didn't know about withLatestFrom. Very nice – Ben Lesh Jan 26 '15 at 19:55
  • 1
    Time semantics of withLatestFrom are the same as map operator, therefore price emits only when totalValue emits. – André Staltz Jan 26 '15 at 19:58
  • Hold on, while examining that, it seems it only emits when the observable withLatestFrom is operating on emits. I'm unsure that's really what the OP is asking for, even though in his example he has only one source observable. – Ben Lesh Jan 26 '15 at 20:12
  • In the scenario when you want a price to update with any change to each of it's source observables, you'd need to either merge them all together and use withLatestFrom, or do something like the scan I showed below. – Ben Lesh Jan 26 '15 at 20:13
  • 1
    He said "only $total prompts price to be updated. (I.e. quantity is sampled but not part of the synchronization pattern.)". Seems to be the case for withLatestFrom. – André Staltz Jan 26 '15 at 20:35
1

EDIT: combineLatest seems to be the equivalent of bacon's when.

I think maybe you're looking to do something like this?

var totalChange = Rx.Observable.fromEvent($('#total'), 'input');

var totalValue = totalChange.map(function () {
  return parseInt($('#total').val(), 10);
});

var quantityValue = totalChange.map(function () {
  return parseInt($('#quantity').val(), 10);
});

Observable.combineLatest(totalValue, quantityValue, function(total, quantity) {
  return total / quantity;
});

Unfortunately, that's the prettiest thing I can think of to answer the spirit of your question.

In reality though, given the example, you'd just do this:

var price = totalChange.map(function() {
  return parseInt($('#total').val(), 10) / parseInt($('#quantity').val(), 10);
});
0

Edit: I just realized this solution is at the bottom of Ben Lesh's answer. I'll leave this here just for the wordier explanation.

If a variable isn't reactive, sometimes the simplest solution is to just acknowledge that and not try to react to it.

Since quantity is not observable, any attempts to make it observable and then combining 2 observable streams is just going to feel hackish.

Instead I'd just embrace its unobservable-ness and use map to read it when total changes:

var totalChange = Rx.Observable.fromEvent($('#total'), 'input');

var totalValue = totalChange.map(function () {
  return parseInt($('#total').val(), 10);
});

var price = totalValue.map(function (total) {
    var quantity = parseInt($('#quantity').val(), 10);
    return total / quantity;
});

price.subscribe(function (p) {
  $('#price').text(p);
});

// or, more succinctly with a single map operation:
var totalChange = Rx.Observable.fromEvent($('#total'), 'input');
var price = totalChange.map(function () {
    var total = parseInt($('#total').val(), 10);
    var quantity = parseInt($('#quantity').val(), 10);
    return total / quantity;
});
price.subscribe(function (p) {
  $('#price').text(p);
});
  • quantity can be observed, hence it's observable. It's enough that it has a readable value. It's better to be functional rather than relying on closures to get the values for total and quantity in the map operation. Also, withLatestFrom can be understood as a.mapWithLatestFrom(b, selector) since the results are emitted at the same times as in a.map(). – André Staltz Jan 29 '15 at 11:27

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