15

I'm trying to see the reason why, in C++11, they had to add the override keyword at the end of the method instead of the beginning like virtual. I don't see the interest of being able to write both virtual and override in the declaration of a method.

Is there a technical reason why the committee didn't choose to simply be able to write override instead of virtual when it was needed?

Thanks!

  • 2
    A large part of the problem is that they aren't reserved keywords! That is, you can name your function override. This is presumably a backwards compatibility problem. – Bill Lynch Jan 27 '15 at 4:55
  • 2
    Context-sensitive keywords is a new C++11 thing, and introduced fairly late in the standardization process. The previous implementation experience from C++/CLI was to put them at the end and that worked well. – T.C. Jan 27 '15 at 5:21
  • There is no technical reason. They liked it there more because it's just a grammar and you are free to create anything you like for your language. Some even thought it would be so cool to put everything in parentheses (see LISP). – t3chb0t Jan 27 '15 at 6:14
  • 1
    "I don't see the interest of being able to write both virtual and override" You don't need to. When declaring an overriding function the virtual keyword has no effect whatsoever, feel free to leave it out. – Ben Voigt Jan 27 '15 at 16:12
  • 1
    @t3chb0t please see my answer here there was a well thought out rationale for this choice. – Shafik Yaghmour May 29 '15 at 14:33
14

The proposal for the addition of the keywords controlling override (override/final) , paper N3151 , gives us some insight about this choice (emphasis mine) :

It is preferable to put such virtual control keywords at the end of the declaration so that they don't clash with eg. return types at the beginning of declarations.

[...]

For context-insensitive, normal keywords, it's less important where the keywords are placed because the words are reserved. We could put them at the beginning of declarations or at the end.

During the discussion of attributes, Francis Glassborow pointed out that the beginning of declarations is becoming crowded. If we put the virtual control keywords at the beginning, we can end up with examples like the one below:

struct B
{
   virtual volatile const unsigned long int f()
      volatile const noexcept;
   void f(int g);
};

struct D : B
{
   virtual hides_name virtual_override final_overrider volatile const unsigned long int f()
      volatile const noexcept;
};

Putting the new keywords at the end at least alleviates the situation somewhat:

struct B
{
   virtual volatile const unsigned long int f()
      volatile const noexcept;
   void f(int g);
};

struct D : B
{
   virtual volatile const unsigned long int f()
      hides_name virtual_override final_overrider volatile const noexcept;
};

There are people who think these control keywords should be in the same place with virtual. As mentioned, that place is already crowded.


Note:

The C++ 11 Standard defines context sensitive keywords in section § 2.11 / 2 [lex.name] :

The identifiers in Table 3 have a special meaning when appearing in a certain context. When referred to in the grammar, these identifiers are used explicitly rather than using the identifier grammar production. Unless otherwise specified, any ambiguity as to whether a given identifier has a special meaning is resolved to interpret the token as a regular identifier.

Table3:

final override

  • Thanks, actually I even wonder why keep the virtual? We could have virtual for the first declaration and override for the next ones. Is there a difference between virtual void f() override and void f() override? – Creak Jan 27 '15 at 4:59
  • 2
    @Creak : C++ allows you to omit virtual in derived classes, see this example, and this question – quantdev Jan 27 '15 at 5:03
  • I know that. I'm simply trying to challenge the concept. For instance, it would have been simpler to be able to right just that: override void f(). You see? – Creak Jan 27 '15 at 5:11
  • But understand that I know the standard won't be changed just because I asked the question ;) I'm simply trying to get the reason why they couldn't do that, because I'm asking this question for a year now and I still have no clue. – Creak Jan 27 '15 at 5:13
  • The C++ designers might try to justify their choice but at the end it's just a design choice. They could have put it everywhere because it's just a grammar and no laws of physics or anything else limit the choices here. Like french or english or german grammars are different so are C++ and C# and Python different although the purpose of all of them is to communicate with (other people or a machine). What matters is what the framework can do for you so why come up with so many different grammars instead of one well designed? I think it's insane. – t3chb0t Jan 27 '15 at 6:08
10

There certainly is a technical reason for it! You can read all about it in this article.

Briefly, override is a context-sensitive keyword, which means that you can also use it as an identifier. It was done this way to avoid breaking existing code that uses this identifier. That means that it has to appear in a position where identifiers are not allowed, namely immediately after the closing parenthesis of a function declaration.

  • 2
    This isn't a reason but a justification. The parser could be programmed in a way it understands override correctly even if it's before the function name. – t3chb0t Jan 27 '15 at 8:33
  • 2
    @t3chb0t: Perhaps you are right. But if override and final are typedefs, it's not obvious to a human how to parse e.g. virtual override final f(); – TonyK Jan 27 '15 at 8:38
  • The abuse of typedef is rather a bad a example ;-] Some time ago there was a similar quesion about what happened if some did this: #define private public. It's impossible to prevent everything. The programmer also has to be resposible for what he is writing. If you desire to write code that no one understands then there is no such programming languge grammar that can prevent that ;-) – t3chb0t Jan 27 '15 at 8:44
  • @t3chb0t: I think we are agreed that the context-dependency rules are simpler this way. Let's just leave it at that. – TonyK Jan 27 '15 at 9:14
  • 1
    I'm not sure it really complicates the language a whole lot, but yes, I can see where it would be nice if override could be in essentially any position instead of having to be in one specific position. At the same time, you have other things (e.g., noexcept) that are similarly restricted, and even in the original language exception specifications were in the same place. – Jerry Coffin Jan 28 '15 at 0:27

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.