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I would like to take a previously initialized array of objects and be able to set that to a class variable.

I don't have a lot of experience with pointers or great coding style.

This is a snippet of the code that I'm working on which isolates the problem:

#include<cstdlib>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class GameBoard {
        string players[];
        int total_players;
    public:
        GameBoard (string given_players[]) {
            players = given_players;
            total_players = sizeof(given_players)/sizeof(*given_players);
        }
};

int main () {
    string players[] = {
        "Jack",
        "Jill"
    };
    GameBoard gb(players);
    return 0;
}

Currently, this code out puts the error:

In constructor 'GameBoard::GameBoard(std::string*)':
[Error] incompatible types in assignment of 'std::string* {aka std::basic_string<char>*}' to 'std::string* [0] {aka std::basic_string<char>* [0]}'
  • 3
    It would be easier if you used a copyable type, such as std::vector<std::string>, instead of an array. Also, your sizeof calculation is wrong. And you need to #include <string>. – juanchopanza Jan 27 '15 at 20:52
  • @ColeLawrence how do you propose the compiler to know the size of given_players? All it knows is that it's an array, but doesn't know the size. Therefore, arrays are not copyable. – inetknght Jan 27 '15 at 20:54
  • @inetknght Arrays are not copyable or assignable, even if you know the size (which, for real arrays, is easy enough to obtain.) – juanchopanza Jan 27 '15 at 20:56
  • 1
    I already made a good suggestion. If you want to disregard it, that's fine with me! – juanchopanza Jan 27 '15 at 20:58
  • 1
    @ColeLawrence No problem. See doc's solution. A vector is a class template. That means you can use it to make a class to hold elements of a given type. vector<string> is a class that holds strings. vector<double> holds doubles, and so on. – juanchopanza Jan 27 '15 at 21:07
3

Better way of doing this

#include <vector>
#include <string>

class GameBoard {
    std::vector<std::string> players;
    int total_players;
public:
    GameBoard (const std::vector<std::string> & p_players):
        players(p_players),
        total_players(p_players.size())
    {
    }
};

then

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> players{"jill", "bill"}; //if C++11 is not available you can use push_back()
    GameBoard b{players};
    return 0;
 }
  • Either pass p_players by const reference, or move it for initialization of players. The latter is the better option. – Mikhail Jan 27 '15 at 21:00
  • @Mikhail O.K. changed it to be oldschool, but take a look plz stackoverflow.com/questions/24543330/… – doc Jan 27 '15 at 21:04
  • Answers to this questions are very shallow. See "Effective Modern C++" by Scott Meyers, Item 41. It elaborates this topic in great detail. In the narrow case of constructor arguments with cheap to move type, you should always prefer passing by value + moving over passing by const reference + copying. – Mikhail Jan 27 '15 at 22:22
  • @Mikhail ah I see what you mean. players(p_players) would not invoke move constructor. – doc Jan 27 '15 at 23:05

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