97

I want to learn the best/simplest way to turn a string into another string but with only a subset, starting at the beginning and going to the last index of a character.

For example, convert "www.stackoverflow.com" to "www.stackoverflow". What code snippet would do that, and being the most swift-like? (I hope this doesn't bring a debate, but I can't find good lesson on how to handle substrings in Swift.

19 Answers 19

191

Just accessing backward

The best way is to use substringToIndex combined to the endIndexproperty and the advance global function.

var string1 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

var index1 = advance(string1.endIndex, -4)

var substring1 = string1.substringToIndex(index1)

Looking for a string starting from the back

Use rangeOfString and set options to .BackwardsSearch

var string2 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

var index2 = string2.rangeOfString(".", options: .BackwardsSearch)?.startIndex

var substring2 = string2.substringToIndex(index2!)

No extensions, pure idiomatic Swift

Swift 2.0

advance is now a part of Index and is called advancedBy. You do it like:

var string1 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

var index1 = string1.endIndex.advancedBy(-4)

var substring1 = string1.substringToIndex(index1)

Swift 3.0

You can't call advancedBy on a String because it has variable size elements. You have to use index(_, offsetBy:).

var string1 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

var index1 = string1.index(string1.endIndex, offsetBy: -4)

var substring1 = string1.substring(to: index1)

A lot of things have been renamed. The cases are written in camelCase, startIndex became lowerBound.

var string2 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

var index2 = string2.range(of: ".", options: .backwards)?.lowerBound

var substring2 = string2.substring(to: index2!)

Also, I wouldn't recommend force unwrapping index2. You can use optional binding or map. Personally, I prefer using map:

var substring3 = index2.map(string2.substring(to:))

Swift 4

The Swift 3 version is still valid but now you can now use subscripts with indexes ranges:

let string1 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

let index1 = string1.index(string1.endIndex, offsetBy: -4)

let substring1 = string1[..<index1]

The second approach remains unchanged:

let string2 = "www.stackoverflow.com"

let index2 = string2.range(of: ".", options: .backwards)?.lowerBound

let substring3 = index2.map(string2.substring(to:))
  • 1
    Thanks @fpg1503. This is the kind of answer I was looking to find. The other answers taught me or reminded me of features in the language, but this is the way I will use to solve my problem. – Jason Hocker Jan 28 '15 at 14:25
  • 1
    Using Swift 2.0, string1.endIndex.advancedBy(-4) is working for me instead of advance – Alex Koshy Oct 2 '15 at 17:50
  • 71
    Is there seriously no way to do this simply? – devios1 Feb 19 '16 at 3:15
  • 11
    @devios all true. I'm grateful for Swift compared to Objective-C, but IMHO the concerns that lead to this insanely awkward code are irrelevant for 99% of code and coders out there. Worse, we'll end up writing bad convenience extensions ourselves. If regular developers can't understand these higher-level concerns, they're the LEAST able to write an ad-hoc API to deal with the pedestrian concerns with which we make software. The tendency to convert to NSString is obviously bad, too, because eventually we all want to get away from the Foundation (legacy) classes. So.... more ranting! – Dan Rosenstark Mar 5 '16 at 1:27
  • 1
    I purposed an edit. Change .BackwardsSearch to String.CompareOptions.backwards . .BackwardsSearch doesn't work anymore in swift 3.0.1 or whatever the latest version is. – Greg432 Mar 18 '17 at 19:24
20

Swift 3, XCode 8

func lastIndexOfCharacter(_ c: Character) -> Int? {
    return range(of: String(c), options: .backwards)?.lowerBound.encodedOffset
}

Since advancedBy(Int) is gone since Swift 3 use String's method index(String.Index, Int). Check out this String extension with substring and friends:

public extension String {

    //right is the first encountered string after left
    func between(_ left: String, _ right: String) -> String? {
        guard let leftRange = range(of: left), let rightRange = range(of: right, options: .backwards)
        , leftRange.upperBound <= rightRange.lowerBound
            else { return nil }

        let sub = self.substring(from: leftRange.upperBound)
        let closestToLeftRange = sub.range(of: right)!
        return sub.substring(to: closestToLeftRange.lowerBound)
    }

    var length: Int {
        get {
            return self.characters.count
        }
    }

    func substring(to : Int) -> String {
        let toIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: to)
        return self.substring(to: toIndex)
    }

    func substring(from : Int) -> String {
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: from)
        return self.substring(from: fromIndex)
    }

    func substring(_ r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)
        let toIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound)
        return self.substring(with: Range<String.Index>(uncheckedBounds: (lower: fromIndex, upper: toIndex)))
    }

    func character(_ at: Int) -> Character {
        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: at)]
    }

    func lastIndexOfCharacter(_ c: Character) -> Int? {
        return range(of: String(c), options: .backwards)?.lowerBound.encodedOffset
    }
}

UPDATED extension for Swift 4

public extension String {

    //right is the first encountered string after left
    func between(_ left: String, _ right: String) -> String? {
        guard
            let leftRange = range(of: left), let rightRange = range(of: right, options: .backwards)
            , leftRange.upperBound <= rightRange.lowerBound
            else { return nil }

        let sub = self[leftRange.upperBound...]
        let closestToLeftRange = sub.range(of: right)!            
        return String(sub[..<closestToLeftRange.lowerBound])
    }

    var length: Int {
        get {
            return self.count
        }
    }

    func substring(to : Int) -> String {
        let toIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: to)
        return String(self[...toIndex])
    }

    func substring(from : Int) -> String {
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: from)
        return String(self[fromIndex...])
    }

    func substring(_ r: Range<Int>) -> String {
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)
        let toIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound)
        let indexRange = Range<String.Index>(uncheckedBounds: (lower: fromIndex, upper: toIndex))
        return String(self[indexRange])
    }

    func character(_ at: Int) -> Character {
        return self[self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: at)]
    }

    func lastIndexOfCharacter(_ c: Character) -> Int? {
        return range(of: String(c), options: .backwards)?.lowerBound.encodedOffset
    }
}

Usage:

let text = "www.stackoverflow.com"
let at = text.character(3) // .
let range = text.substring(0..<3) // www
let from = text.substring(from: 4) // stackoverflow.com
let to = text.substring(to: 16) // www.stackoverflow
let between = text.between(".", ".") // stackoverflow
let substringToLastIndexOfChar = text.lastIndexOfCharacter(".") // 17

P.S. It's really odd that developers forced to deal with String.Index instead of plain Int. Why should we bother about internal String mechanics and not just have simple substring() methods?

12

I would do it using a subscript (s[start..<end]):

Swift 2

let s = "www.stackoverflow.com"
let start = s.startIndex
let end = s.endIndex.advancedBy(-4)
let substring = s[start..<end] // www.stackoverflow

Swift 3

let s = "www.stackoverflow.com"
let start = s.startIndex
let end = s.index(s.endIndex, offsetBy: -4)
let substring = s[start..<end] // www.stackoverflow
8

For example, convert "www.stackoverflow.com" to "www.stackoverflow". What code snippet would do that, and being the most swift-like?

Can it be more Swift-like?

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com".stringByDeletingPathExtension   // "www.stackoverflow"

update: Xcode 7.2.1 • Swift 2.1.1

extension String {
    var nsValue: NSString {
        return self
    }
}

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com".nsValue.stringByDeletingPathExtension   // "www.stackoverflow"

edit/update:

In Swift 4 or later (Xcode 10.0+) you can use the new Array lastIndex(of:)

func lastIndex(of element: Element) -> Int?

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
if let lastIndex = string.lastIndex(of: ".") {
    let subString = string[..<lastIndex]  // "www.stackoverflow"
}
  • This is a great answer, but it seems that with Swift 2, this property has been moved to NSUrl. Maybe this helps people reading this in the future... – chuky Feb 16 '16 at 21:28
  • 1
    @chuky You can still cast it to NSString – Leo Dabus Feb 16 '16 at 21:33
7

Here's how I do it. You could do it the same way, or use this code for ideas.

let s = "www.stackoverflow.com"
s.substringWithRange(0..<s.lastIndexOf("."))

Here are the extensions I use:

import Foundation
extension String {

  var length: Int {
    get {
      return countElements(self)
    }
  }

  func indexOf(target: String) -> Int {
    var range = self.rangeOfString(target)
    if let range = range {
      return distance(self.startIndex, range.startIndex)
    } else {
      return -1
    }
  }

  func indexOf(target: String, startIndex: Int) -> Int {
    var startRange = advance(self.startIndex, startIndex)        
    var range = self.rangeOfString(target, options: NSStringCompareOptions.LiteralSearch, range: Range<String.Index>(start: startRange, end: self.endIndex))
    if let range = range {
      return distance(self.startIndex, range.startIndex)
    } else {
      return -1
    }
  }

  func lastIndexOf(target: String) -> Int {
    var index = -1
    var stepIndex = self.indexOf(target)
    while stepIndex > -1 {
      index = stepIndex
      if stepIndex + target.length < self.length {
        stepIndex = indexOf(target, startIndex: stepIndex + target.length)
      } else {
        stepIndex = -1
      }
    }
    return index
  } 

  func substringWithRange(range:Range<Int>) -> String {
    let start = advance(self.startIndex, range.startIndex)
    let end = advance(self.startIndex, range.endIndex)
    return self.substringWithRange(start..<end)
  }

}

Credit albertbori / Common Swift String Extensions

Generally I am a strong proponent of extensions, especially for needs like string manipulation, searching, and slicing.

  • 2
    I think these are really something Apple should do, to improve the API of String in Swift. – skyline75489 Jan 28 '15 at 0:47
  • 2
    Looking for this API. Apple Swift is lacking a lot of basic API. It is a very complex language and also not complete. Swift is bullshit! – Loc Jan 17 '16 at 22:24
  • Here's a forked and updated to Swift 3 version of the library you reference: github.com/iamjono/SwiftString – RenniePet Dec 14 '16 at 0:30
4

String has builtin substring feature:

extension String : Sliceable {
    subscript (subRange: Range<String.Index>) -> String { get }
}

If what you want is "going to the first index of a character", you can get the substring using builtin find() function:

var str = "www.stackexchange.com"
str[str.startIndex ..< find(str, ".")!] // -> "www"

To find last index, we can implement findLast().

/// Returns the last index where `value` appears in `domain` or `nil` if
/// `value` is not found.
///
/// Complexity: O(\ `countElements(domain)`\ )
func findLast<C: CollectionType where C.Generator.Element: Equatable>(domain: C, value: C.Generator.Element) -> C.Index? {
    var last:C.Index? = nil
    for i in domain.startIndex..<domain.endIndex {
        if domain[i] == value {
            last = i
        }
    }
    return last
}

let str = "www.stackexchange.com"
let substring = map(findLast(str, ".")) { str[str.startIndex ..< $0] } // as String?
// if "." is found, substring has some, otherwise `nil`

ADDED:

Maybe, BidirectionalIndexType specialized version of findLast is faster:

func findLast<C: CollectionType where C.Generator.Element: Equatable, C.Index: BidirectionalIndexType>(domain: C, value: C.Generator.Element) -> C.Index? {
    for i in lazy(domain.startIndex ..< domain.endIndex).reverse() {
        if domain[i] == value {
            return i
        }
    }
    return nil
}
  • The subscript for String doesn't seem to be available in Swift 2.0, do you know a replacement? – Cory Aug 25 '15 at 14:57
  • Do you know how can I constraint Index to BidirectionalIndexType in Swift 4 or later? – Leo Dabus Aug 29 '18 at 11:20
4

You can use these extensions:

Swift 2.3

 extension String
    {
        func substringFromIndex(index: Int) -> String
        {
            if (index < 0 || index > self.characters.count)
            {
                print("index \(index) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            return self.substringFromIndex(self.startIndex.advancedBy(index))
        }

        func substringToIndex(index: Int) -> String
        {
            if (index < 0 || index > self.characters.count)
            {
                print("index \(index) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            return self.substringToIndex(self.startIndex.advancedBy(index))
        }

        func substringWithRange(start: Int, end: Int) -> String
        {
            if (start < 0 || start > self.characters.count)
            {
                print("start index \(start) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            else if end < 0 || end > self.characters.count
            {
                print("end index \(end) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            let range = Range(start: self.startIndex.advancedBy(start), end: self.startIndex.advancedBy(end))
            return self.substringWithRange(range)
        }

        func substringWithRange(start: Int, location: Int) -> String
        {
            if (start < 0 || start > self.characters.count)
            {
                print("start index \(start) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            else if location < 0 || start + location > self.characters.count
            {
                print("end index \(start + location) out of bounds")
                return ""
            }
            let range = Range(start: self.startIndex.advancedBy(start), end: self.startIndex.advancedBy(start + location))
            return self.substringWithRange(range)
        }
    }

Swift 3

extension String
{   
    func substring(from index: Int) -> String
    {
        if (index < 0 || index > self.characters.count)
        {
            print("index \(index) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        return self.substring(from: self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index))
    }

    func substring(to index: Int) -> String
    {
        if (index < 0 || index > self.characters.count)
        {
            print("index \(index) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        return self.substring(to: self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index))
    }

    func substring(start: Int, end: Int) -> String
    {
        if (start < 0 || start > self.characters.count)
        {
            print("start index \(start) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        else if end < 0 || end > self.characters.count
        {
            print("end index \(end) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        let startIndex = self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: start)
        let endIndex = self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: end)
        let range = startIndex..<endIndex

        return self.substring(with: range)
    }

    func substring(start: Int, location: Int) -> String
    {
        if (start < 0 || start > self.characters.count)
        {
            print("start index \(start) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        else if location < 0 || start + location > self.characters.count
        {
            print("end index \(start + location) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        let startIndex = self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: start)
        let endIndex = self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: start + location)
        let range = startIndex..<endIndex

        return self.substring(with: range)
    }
}

Usage:

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"        
let substring = string.substringToIndex(string.characters.count-4)
3

Do you want to get a substring of a string from start index to the last index of one of its characters? If so, you may choose one of the following Swift 2.0+ methods.

Methods that require Foundation

Get a substring that includes the last index of a character:

import Foundation

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
if let rangeOfIndex = string.rangeOfCharacterFromSet(NSCharacterSet(charactersInString: "."), options: .BackwardsSearch) {
    print(string.substringToIndex(rangeOfIndex.endIndex))
}

// prints "www.stackoverflow."

Get a substring that DOES NOT include the last index of a character:

import Foundation

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
if let rangeOfIndex = string.rangeOfCharacterFromSet(NSCharacterSet(charactersInString: "."), options: .BackwardsSearch) {
    print(string.substringToIndex(rangeOfIndex.startIndex))
}

// prints "www.stackoverflow"

If you need to repeat those operations, extending String can be a good solution:

import Foundation

extension String {
    func substringWithLastInstanceOf(character: Character) -> String? {
        if let rangeOfIndex = rangeOfCharacterFromSet(NSCharacterSet(charactersInString: String(character)), options: .BackwardsSearch) {
            return self.substringToIndex(rangeOfIndex.endIndex)
        }
        return nil
    }
    func substringWithoutLastInstanceOf(character: Character) -> String? {
        if let rangeOfIndex = rangeOfCharacterFromSet(NSCharacterSet(charactersInString: String(character)), options: .BackwardsSearch) {
            return self.substringToIndex(rangeOfIndex.startIndex)
        }
        return nil
    }
}

print("www.stackoverflow.com".substringWithLastInstanceOf("."))
print("www.stackoverflow.com".substringWithoutLastInstanceOf("."))

/*
prints:
Optional("www.stackoverflow.")
Optional("www.stackoverflow")
*/

Methods that DO NOT require Foundation

Get a substring that includes the last index of a character:

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
if let reverseIndex = string.characters.reverse().indexOf(".") {
    print(string[string.startIndex ..< reverseIndex.base])
}

// prints "www.stackoverflow."

Get a substring that DOES NOT include the last index of a character:

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
if let reverseIndex = string.characters.reverse().indexOf(".") {
    print(string[string.startIndex ..< reverseIndex.base.advancedBy(-1)])
}

// prints "www.stackoverflow"

If you need to repeat those operations, extending String can be a good solution:

extension String {
    func substringWithLastInstanceOf(character: Character) -> String? {
        if let reverseIndex = characters.reverse().indexOf(".") {
            return self[self.startIndex ..< reverseIndex.base]
        }
        return nil
    }
    func substringWithoutLastInstanceOf(character: Character) -> String? {
        if let reverseIndex = characters.reverse().indexOf(".") {
            return self[self.startIndex ..< reverseIndex.base.advancedBy(-1)]
        }
        return nil
    }
}

print("www.stackoverflow.com".substringWithLastInstanceOf("."))
print("www.stackoverflow.com".substringWithoutLastInstanceOf("."))

/*
prints:
Optional("www.stackoverflow.")
Optional("www.stackoverflow")
*/
3

Here's an easy and short way to get a substring if you know the index:

let s = "www.stackoverflow.com"
let result = String(s.characters.prefix(17)) // "www.stackoverflow"

It won't crash the app if your index exceeds string's length:

let s = "short"
let result = String(s.characters.prefix(17)) // "short"

Both examples are Swift 3 ready.

3

Swift 3:

extension String {

    /// the length of the string
    var length: Int {
        return self.characters.count
    }

    /// Get substring, e.g. "ABCDE".substring(index: 2, length: 3) -> "CDE"
    ///
    /// - parameter index:  the start index
    /// - parameter length: the length of the substring
    ///
    /// - returns: the substring
    public func substring(index: Int, length: Int) -> String {
        if self.length <= index {
            return ""
        }
        let leftIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index)
        if self.length <= index + length {
            return self.substring(from: leftIndex)
        }
        let rightIndex = self.index(self.endIndex, offsetBy: -(self.length - index - length))
        return self.substring(with: leftIndex..<rightIndex)
    }

    /// Get substring, e.g. -> "ABCDE".substring(left: 0, right: 2) -> "ABC"
    ///
    /// - parameter left:  the start index
    /// - parameter right: the end index
    ///
    /// - returns: the substring
    public func substring(left: Int, right: Int) -> String {
        if length <= left {
            return ""
        }
        let leftIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: left)
        if length <= right {
            return self.substring(from: leftIndex)
        }
        else {
            let rightIndex = self.index(self.endIndex, offsetBy: -self.length + right + 1)
            return self.substring(with: leftIndex..<rightIndex)
        }
    }
}

you can test it as follows:

    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(index: 2, length: 3) == "CDE"))
    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(index: 0, length: 3) == "ABC"))
    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(index: 2, length: 1000) == "CDE"))
    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(left: 0, right: 2) == "ABC"))
    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(left: 1, right: 3) == "BCD"))
    print("test: " + String("ABCDE".substring(left: 3, right: 1000) == "DE"))
  • Error: Value of type 'String' has no member 'length' – Joris Mans Dec 29 '16 at 14:34
  • @JorisMans You right. I forgot to add this helpful property here. Now fixed. – Alexander Volkov Jan 3 '17 at 22:07
2
func substr(myString: String, start: Int, clen: Int)->String

{
  var index2 = string1.startIndex.advancedBy(start)
  var substring2 = string1.substringFromIndex(index2)
  var index1 = substring2.startIndex.advancedBy(clen)
  var substring1 = substring2.substringToIndex(index1)

  return substring1   
}

substr(string1, start: 3, clen: 5)
2

Swift 3

let string = "www.stackoverflow.com"
let first3Characters = String(string.characters.prefix(3)) // www
let lastCharacters = string.characters.dropFirst(4) // stackoverflow.com (it would be a collection)

//or by index 
let indexOfFouthCharacter = olNumber.index(olNumber.startIndex, offsetBy: 4)
let first3Characters = olNumber.substring(to: indexOfFouthCharacter) // www
let lastCharacters = olNumber.substring(from: indexOfFouthCharacter) // .stackoverflow.com

Good article for understanding, why do we need this

1

I've extended String with two substring methods. You can call substring with a from/to range or from/length like so:

var bcd = "abcdef".substring(1,to:3)
var cde = "abcdef".substring(2,to:-2)
var cde = "abcdef".substring(2,length:3)

extension String {
  public func substring(from:Int = 0, var to:Int = -1) -> String {
    if to < 0 {
        to = self.length + to
    }
    return self.substringWithRange(Range<String.Index>(
        start:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from),
        end:self.startIndex.advancedBy(to+1)))
  }
  public func substring(from:Int = 0, length:Int) -> String {
    return self.substringWithRange(Range<String.Index>(
        start:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from),
        end:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from+length)))
  }
}
  • self.length is not available anymore. You need to add this in the extension (Andrewz, please update the code ; i don't want to post another answer): public func length() -> Int { return self.lengthOfBytesUsingEncoding(NSUTF16StringEncoding) } – philippe May 16 '16 at 19:09
1

The one thing that adds clatter is the repeated stringVar:

stringVar[stringVar.index(stringVar.startIndex, offsetBy: ...)

In Swift 4

An extension can reduce some of that:

extension String {

    func index(at: Int) -> String.Index {
        return self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: at)
    }
}

Then, usage:

let string = "abcde"

let to = string[..<string.index(at: 3)] // abc
let from = string[string.index(at: 3)...] // de

It should be noted that to and from are type Substring (or String.SubSequance). They do not allocate new strings and are more efficient for processing.

To get back a String type, Substring needs to be casted back to String:

let backToString = String(from)

This is where a string is finally allocated.

0

For Swift 2.0, it's like this:

var string1 = "www.stackoverflow.com"
var index1 = string1.endIndex.advancedBy(-4)
var substring1 = string1.substringToIndex(index1)
  • Maybe they've changed it, but it's 'advancedBy' ( note the 'd' on the end of 'advanced' ) – Wedge Martin Oct 14 '15 at 22:47
0

Swift 2.0 The code below is tested on XCode 7.2 . Please refer to the attached screenshot at the bottom

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        var mainText = "http://stackoverflow.com"

        var range = Range(start: mainText.startIndex.advancedBy(7), end: mainText.startIndex.advancedBy(24))
        var subText = mainText.substringWithRange(range)


        //OR Else use below for LAST INDEX

        range = Range(start: mainText.startIndex.advancedBy(7), end: mainText.endIndex)
        subText = mainText.substringWithRange(range)
    }
}
0

I've modified andrewz' post to make it compatible with Swift 2.0 (and maybe Swift 3.0). In my humble opinion, this extension is easier to understand and similar to what is available in other languages (like PHP).

extension String {

    func length() -> Int {
        return self.lengthOfBytesUsingEncoding(NSUTF16StringEncoding)
    }
    func substring(from:Int = 0, to:Int = -1) -> String {
       var nto=to
        if nto < 0 {
            nto = self.length() + nto
        }
        return self.substringWithRange(Range<String.Index>(
           start:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from),
           end:self.startIndex.advancedBy(nto+1)))
    }
    func substring(from:Int = 0, length:Int) -> String {
        return self.substringWithRange(Range<String.Index>(
            start:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from),
            end:self.startIndex.advancedBy(from+length)))
    }
}
0

I also build a simple String-extension for Swift 4:

extension String {
    func subStr(s: Int, l: Int) -> String { //s=start, l=lenth
        let r = Range(NSRange(location: s, length: l))!
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.lowerBound)
        let toIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: r.upperBound)
        let indexRange = Range<String.Index>(uncheckedBounds: (lower: fromIndex, upper: toIndex))

        return String(self[indexRange])
     }
}

So you can easily call it like this:

"Hallo world".subStr(s: 1, l: 3) //prints --> "all"
-1

Here is a simple way to get substring in Swift

import UIKit

var str = "Hello, playground" 
var res = NSString(string: str)
print(res.substring(from: 4))
print(res.substring(to: 10))
  • OP asks "How to get substring from start to last index of character" not how to get substring using predefined hardcoded values. – ayaio Jun 9 '17 at 9:24
  • This was original example: convert "www.stackoverflow.com" to "www.stackoverflow". If you want a substring from the start to the end then there is nothing to do i.e. the result is input string as is. Please restore usefulness of above answer. – ZagorTeNej Jun 26 '17 at 16:35

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