71

Can anyone suggest Go container for simple and fast FIF/queue, Go has 3 different containers: heap, list and vector. Which one is more suitable to implement a queue?

0

14 Answers 14

15

Either vector or list should work, but vector is probably the way to go. I say this because vector will probably allocate less often than list and garbage collection (in the current Go implementation) is fairly expensive. In a small program it probably won't matter, though.

2
103

In fact, if what you want is a basic and easy to use fifo queue, slice provides all you need.

queue := make([]int, 0)
// Push to the queue
queue = append(queue, 1)
// Top (just get next element, don't remove it)
x = queue[0]
// Discard top element
queue = queue[1:]
// Is empty ?
if len(queue) == 0 {
    fmt.Println("Queue is empty !")
}

Of course, we suppose that we can trust the inner implementation of append and slicing so that it avoid useless resize and reallocation. For basic usage, this is perfectly sufficient.

12
  • 4
  • 3
    @Florian, this example code uses []int where copying is what you want. If instead it was type Foo struct {/*lots of fields*/} you would usually use []*Foo and have the queue be pointers and you wouldn't copy elements at all just the pointer. (Then you'd also want to do queue[0] = nil; queue = queue[1:] to discard the first element and remove the reference to it from the queue). – Dave C Aug 31 '15 at 16:43
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    The problem with this implementation is that its memory usage is proportional to the number of dequeue calls. – kostya Feb 3 '16 at 6:49
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    This is not a good approach, as every time queue[1:] is done, it moves the start of the slice to point to the next element, but does not release the spaced used by the dequeued element. Effectively it has unbounded memory growth in the slice storage. Additionally, if the queued element is a pointer, or a struct containing pointers, then the underlying slice storage will retain the memory to the dequeued element, causing a further memory leak. – tul Jun 8 '18 at 10:11
  • 11
    Comments by @kostya and @tul are inaccurate. append will create a new backing array whenever there is not enough capacity to hold new elements. So, as long as you throw out the old slice queue=queue[1:], memory usage is not unbounded. It still might take awhile to reclaim that memory if the slice is large. – Nuno Cruces Jan 17 '19 at 11:59
67

Surprised to see no one has suggested buffered channels yet, for size bound FIFO Queue anyways.

//Or however many you might need + buffer.
c := make(chan int, 300)

//Push
c <- value

//Pop
x <- c
7
  • 4
    For small queues that don't need persistence, this should be the default thing to do. Even if you are writing into an unbounded queue on disk, writing and reading from a channel is often a good way to do it. – Rob Sep 27 '16 at 14:47
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    Indeed, this seems by far the easiest and most logical to me. – Eric Apr 12 '17 at 20:24
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    Isn't x = <- c a blocking call? If c is empty than your go routing could hang till the queue is replenished. That's not the behavior that you want of a simple queue data structure? – anaken78 Jan 17 '18 at 8:23
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    @anaken78: Nothing that a select/default clause can't fix, right? gobyexample.com/non-blocking-channel-operations – Kostas Jun 17 '18 at 1:29
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    @JinLim You can, just omit the second value passed to the make function, but than of course it won't be a buffered channel and thus you won't be able to use it as a queue. – Nimrod Yonatan Ben-Nes Aug 23 '20 at 8:39
7

To expand on the implementation side, Moraes proposes in his gist some struct from queue and stack:

// Stack is a basic LIFO stack that resizes as needed.
type Stack struct {
    nodes   []*Node
    count   int
}
// Queue is a basic FIFO queue based on a circular list that resizes as needed.
type Queue struct {
    nodes   []*Node
    head    int
    tail    int
    count   int
}

You can see it in action in this playground example.

1
  • That gist is so poorly designed though =/ – Sir Nov 13 '17 at 1:48
6

Using a slice and an appropriate ("circular") indexing scheme on top still seems to be the way to go. Here's my take on it: https://github.com/phf/go-queue The benchmarks there also confirm that channels are faster, but at the price of more limited functionality.

4
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    This would be a rather better answer if it excerpted some of the more relevant code from your repo. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 22 '17 at 2:45
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    I assumed that whoever wanted to see the code would just click the link. Sorry, I am totally new here. I'll update the answer with some snippets. – Peter Froehlich Apr 22 '17 at 3:01
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    Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad answer as it is, and certainly isn't going to be deleted as some superficially similar "link-only" answers are, but it could be a bit better than it is with more of the same: explanations of actual code, which are the most important thing for an SO answer. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 22 '17 at 3:03
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    The funny thing is that posting this answer made me revise the code and now my queue is actually faster than a channel. More meat for a revised answer, coming soon. – Peter Froehlich Apr 22 '17 at 5:04
6

Most queue implementations are in one of three flavors: slice-based, linked list-based, and circular-buffer (ring-buffer) based.

  • Slice-based queues tend to waste memory because they do not reuse the memory previously occupied by removed items. Also, slice based queues tend to only be single-ended.
  • Linked list queues can be better about memory reuse, but are generally a little slower and use more memory overall because of the overhead of maintaining links. They can offer the ability to add and remove items from the middle of the queue without moving memory around, but if you are doing much of that a queue is the wrong data structure.
  • Ring-buffer queues offer all the efficiency of slices, with the advantage of not wasting memory. Fewer allocations means better performance. They are just as efficient adding and removing items from either end so you naturally get a double-ended queue. So, as a general recommendation I would recommend a ring-buffer based queue implementation. This is what is discussed in the rest of this post.

The ring-buffer based queue reuses memory by wrapping its storage around: As the queue grows beyond one end of the underlying slice, it adds additional nodes to the other end of the slice. See deque diagram

Also, a bit of code to illustrate:

// PushBack appends an element to the back of the queue.  Implements FIFO when
// elements are removed with PopFront(), and LIFO when elements are removed
// with PopBack().
func (q *Deque) PushBack(elem interface{}) {
    q.growIfFull()
    q.buf[q.tail] = elem
    // Calculate new tail position.
    q.tail = q.next(q.tail)
    q.count++
}

// next returns the next buffer position wrapping around buffer.
func (q *Deque) next(i int) int {
    return (i + 1) & (len(q.buf) - 1) // bitwise modulus
}

This particular implementation always uses a buffer size that is a power of 2, and can therefore compute the bitwise modulus to be a little more efficient.

This means the slice needs to grow only when all its capacity is used up. With a resizing strategy that avoids growing and shrinking storage on the same boundary, this makes it very memory efficient.

Here is code that resizes the underlying slice buffer:

// resize resizes the deque to fit exactly twice its current contents. This is
// used to grow the queue when it is full, and also to shrink it when it is     
// only a quarter full.                                                         
func (q *Deque) resize() {
    newBuf := make([]interface{}, q.count<<1)
    if q.tail > q.head {
        copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
    } else {
        n := copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:])
        copy(newBuf[n:], q.buf[:q.tail])
    }
    q.head = 0
    q.tail = q.count
    q.buf = newBuf
}

Another thing to consider is if you want concurrency safety built into the implementation. You may want to avoid this so that you can do whatever works best for your concurrency strategy, and you certainly do not want it if your do not need it; same reason as not wanting a slice that has some built-in serialization.

There are a number of ring-buffer based queue implementations for Go if you do a search on godoc for deque. Choose one that best suits your tastes.

5

Edit, cleaner implementation of a Queue:

package main

import "fmt"

type Queue []interface{}

func (self *Queue) Push(x interface{}) {
    *self = append(*self, x)
}

func (self *Queue) Pop() interface{} {
    h := *self
    var el interface{}
    l := len(h)
    el, *self = h[0], h[1:l]
    // Or use this instead for a Stack
    // el, *self = h[l-1], h[0:l-1]
    return el
}

func NewQueue() *Queue {
    return &Queue{}
}


func main() {
  q := NewQueue()
  q.Push(1)
  q.Push(2)
  q.Push(3)
  q.Push("L")

  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())

}

Just embed a "container/list" inside a simple implementation and expose the interface

package queue

import "container/list"

// Queue is a queue
type Queue interface {
    Front() *list.Element
    Len() int
    Add(interface{})
    Remove()
}

type queueImpl struct {
    *list.List
}

func (q *queueImpl) Add(v interface{}) {
    q.PushBack(v)
}

func (q *queueImpl) Remove() {
    e := q.Front()
    q.List.Remove(e)
}

// New is a new instance of a Queue
func New() Queue {
    return &queueImpl{list.New()}
}
3

Unfortunately queues aren't currently part of the go standard library, so you need to write your own / import someone else's solution. It's a shame as containers written outside of the standard library aren't able to use generics.

A simple example of a fixed capacity queue would be:

type MyQueueElement struct {
  blah int // whatever you want
}

const MAX_QUEUE_SIZE = 16
type Queue struct {
  content  [MAX_QUEUE_SIZE]MyQueueElement
  readHead int
  writeHead int
  len int
}

func (q *Queue) Push(e MyQueueElement) bool {
  if q.len >= MAX_QUEUE_SIZE {
    return false
  }
  q.content[q.writeHead] = e
  q.writeHead = (q.writeHead + 1) % MAX_QUEUE_SIZE
  q.len++
  return true
}

func (q *Queue) Pop() (MyQueueElement, bool) {
  if q.len <= 0 {
    return MyQueueElement{}, false
  }
  result := q.content[q.readHead]
  q.content[q.readHead] = MyQueueElement{}
  q.readHead = (q.readHead + 1) % MAX_QUEUE_SIZE
  q.len--
  return result, true
}

Gotchas avoided here include not having unbounded slice growth (caused by using the slice [1:] operation to discard), and zeroing out popped elements to ensure their contents are available for garbage collection. Note, in the case of a MyQueueElement struct containing only an int like here, it will make no difference, but if struct contained pointers it would.

The solution could be extended to reallocate and copy should an auto growing queue be desired.

This solution is not thread safe, but a lock could be added to Push/Pop if that is desired.

Playground https://play.golang.org/

1

I also implement the queue from slice as above. However, It's not thread-safe. So I decided to add a lock (mutex lock) to guarantee thread-safe.

package queue

import (
  "sync"
)

type Queue struct {
  lock *sync.Mutex
  Values []int
}

func Init() Queue {
  return Queue{&sync.Mutex{}, make([]int, 0)}
}

func (q *Queue) Enqueue(x int) {
  for {
    q.lock.Lock()
    q.Values = append(q.Values, x)
    q.lock.Unlock()
    return
  }
}

func (q *Queue) Dequeue() *int {
  for {
    if (len(q.Values) > 0) {
      q.lock.Lock()
      x := q.Values[0]
      q.Values = q.Values[1:]
      q.lock.Unlock()
      return &x
    }
    return nil
  }
  return nil
}

You can check my solution on github here simple queue

0
1
type Queue struct {
    slice []int
    len   int
}
func newq() Queue {
    q := Queue{}
    q.slice = make([]int, 0)
    q.len = 0
    return q
}
func (q *Queue) Add(v int) {
    q.slice = append(q.slice, v)
    q.len++
}

func (q *Queue) PopLeft() int {
    a := q.slice[0]
    q.slice = q.slice[1:]
    q.len--
    return a
}
func (q *Queue) Pop() int {
    a := q.slice[q.len-1]
    q.slice = q.slice[:q.len-1]
    q.len--
    return a
}

For your basic need the code above would do

0

I implemented a queue that will expand the underlying buffer automatically:

package types

// Note: this queue does not shrink the underlying buffer.                                                                                                               
type queue struct {
        buf  [][4]int // change to the element data type that you need                                                                                                   
        head int
        tail int
}

func (q *queue) extend(need int) {
        if need-(len(q.buf)-q.head) > 0 {
                if need-len(q.buf) <= 0 {
                        copy(q.buf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
            q.tail = q.tail - q.head
                        q.head = 0
                        return
                }

                newSize := len(q.buf) * 2
                if newSize == 0 {
                    newSize = 100
            }
                newBuf := make([][4]int, newSize)
                copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
                q.buf = newBuf
        q.tail = q.tail - q.head
                q.head = 0
        }
}

func (q *queue) push(p [4]int) {
        q.extend(q.tail + 1)
        q.buf[q.tail] = p
        q.tail++
}

func (q *queue) pop() [4]int {
        r := q.buf[q.head]
        q.head++
        return r
}

func (q *queue) size() int {
        return q.tail - q.head
}


// put the following into queue_test.go
package types

import (
        "testing"

        "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert"
)

func TestQueue(t *testing.T) {
        const total = 1000
        q := &queue{}
        for i := 0; i < total; i++ {
                q.push([4]int{i, i, i, i})
                assert.Equal(t, i+1, q.size())
        }

    for i := 0; i < total; i++ {
                v := q.pop()
                assert.Equal(t, [4]int{i, i, i, i}, v)
                assert.Equal(t, total-1-i, q.size())
        }
}
0

list is enough for queue and stack, what we shoud do is l.Remove(l.Front()) for queue Poll, l.Remove(l.Back())for stack Poll,PushBack for the Add Operation for stack and queue. there are front and back pointer for list, such that time complexity is O(1)

-1

Double stack implementation:

O(1) Enqueue and Dequeue and uses slices (which tends to be better for cache misses).

type Queue struct{
    enqueue, dequeue Stack
}

func (q *Queue) Enqueue(n *Thing){
    q.enqueue.Push(n)
}

func (q *Queue) Dequeue()(*Thing, bool){
    v, ok := q.dequeue.Pop()
    if ok{
        return v, true
    }

    for {
        v, ok := d.enqueue.Pop()
        if !ok{
            break
        }

        d.dequeue.Push(v)
    }

    return d.dequeue.Pop()
}

type Stack struct{
    v []*Thing
}

func (s *Stack)Push(n *Thing){
    s.v=append(s.v, n)
}

func (s *Stack) Pop()(*Thing, bool){
    if len(s.v) == 0 {
        return nil, false
    }

    lastIdx := len(s.v)-1
    v := s.v[lastIdx]
    s.v=s.v[:lastIdx]
    return v, true
}
-2

Slice can be used to implement queue.

type queue struct {
    values []*int
}

func New() *queue {
   queue := &queue{}
   return queue
}

func (q *queue) enqueue(val *int) {
   q.values = append(q.values, val)
}

//deque function

Update:

here is complete implementation on my GitHub page https://github.com/raiskumar/algo-ds/blob/master/tree/queue.go

4
  • 1
    aand where's dequeue? – wingerse Jun 28 '17 at 12:56
  • Left out implementation intentionally (use enqueue method to understand how dequeue will get implemented) :) – rai.skumar Jun 29 '17 at 15:49
  • 1
    you mean q.values = q.values[i:] ? That's gonna waste memory. – wingerse Jun 29 '17 at 16:02
  • It wasn't from me. – wingerse Jul 27 '17 at 18:06

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