115

Can anyone suggest Go container for simple and fast FIFO/queue, Go has 3 different containers: heap, list and vector. Which one is more suitable to implement a queue?

0

18 Answers 18

158

In fact, if what you want is a basic and easy to use fifo queue, slice provides all you need.

queue := make([]int, 0)
// Push to the queue
queue = append(queue, 1)
// Top (just get next element, don't remove it)
x = queue[0]
// Discard top element
queue = queue[1:]
// Is empty ?
if len(queue) == 0 {
    fmt.Println("Queue is empty !")
}

Of course, we suppose that we can trust the inner implementation of append and slicing so that it avoid useless resize and reallocation. For basic usage, this is perfectly sufficient.

12
  • 4
    SliceTricks: How to do vector-esque things with slices.
    – peterSO
    Commented Nov 11, 2014 at 23:51
  • 3
    Problem with this is that the element will be copied quite often. That might not be an issue at all (copying is fast) but it's something to keep in mind.
    – znkr
    Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 21:02
  • 20
    The problem with this implementation is that its memory usage is proportional to the number of dequeue calls.
    – kostya
    Commented Feb 3, 2016 at 6:49
  • 25
    Comments by @kostya and @tul are inaccurate. append will create a new backing array whenever there is not enough capacity to hold new elements. So, as long as you throw out the old slice queue=queue[1:], memory usage is not unbounded. It still might take awhile to reclaim that memory if the slice is large. Commented Jan 17, 2019 at 11:59
  • 9
    Agreed @NunoCruces. The first element will be garbage collected when enough new elements are added to the slice to cause reallocation --then removed elements can be discarded. go.googlesource.com/go/+/master/src/runtime/slice.go#76 Commented Oct 16, 2019 at 12:08
120

Surprised to see no one has suggested buffered channels yet, for size bound FIFO Queue anyways.

//Or however many you might need + buffer.
c := make(chan int, 300)

//Push
c <- value

//Pop
x <- c
9
  • 4
    For small queues that don't need persistence, this should be the default thing to do. Even if you are writing into an unbounded queue on disk, writing and reading from a channel is often a good way to do it.
    – Rob
    Commented Sep 27, 2016 at 14:47
  • 1
    Indeed, this seems by far the easiest and most logical to me.
    – Eric
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 20:24
  • 15
    Isn't x = <- c a blocking call? If c is empty than your go routing could hang till the queue is replenished. That's not the behavior that you want of a simple queue data structure?
    – anaken78
    Commented Jan 17, 2018 at 8:23
  • 7
    @anaken78: Nothing that a select/default clause can't fix, right? gobyexample.com/non-blocking-channel-operations
    – Kostas
    Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 1:29
  • 40
    From "The Go programming Language" by Donovan and Kernighan (pag 233): Novices are sometimes tempted to use buffered channels within a single goroutine as a queue, lured by their pleasingly simple syntax, but this is a mistake . Channels are deeply connected to goroutine scheduling, and without another goroutine receiving from the channel, a sender—and perhaps the whole program—risks becoming blocked forever. If all you need is a simple queue, make one using a slice.
    – izaban
    Commented Aug 10, 2022 at 21:45
28

Most queue implementations are in one of three flavors: slice-based, linked list-based, and circular-buffer (ring-buffer) based.

  • Slice-based queues tend to waste memory because they do not reuse the memory previously occupied by removed items. Also, slice based queues tend to only be single-ended.
  • Linked list queues can be better about memory reuse, but are generally a little slower and use more memory overall because of the overhead of maintaining links. They can offer the ability to add and remove items from the middle of the queue without moving memory around, but if you are doing much of that a list is the wrong data structure.
  • Ring-buffer queues offer all the efficiency of slices, with the advantage of not wasting memory. Fewer allocations means better performance. They are just as efficient adding and removing items from either end so you naturally get a double-ended queue. So, as a general recommendation I would recommend a ring-buffer based queue implementation. This is what is discussed in the rest of this post.

The ring-buffer based queue reuses memory by wrapping its storage around: As the queue grows beyond one end of the underlying slice, it adds additional nodes to the other end of the slice. See deque diagram

Also, a bit of code to illustrate:

// PushBack appends an element to the back of the queue.  Implements FIFO when
// elements are removed with PopFront(), and LIFO when elements are removed
// with PopBack().
func (q *Deque) PushBack(elem interface{}) {
    q.growIfFull()
    q.buf[q.tail] = elem
    // Calculate new tail position.
    q.tail = q.next(q.tail)
    q.count++
}

// next returns the next buffer position wrapping around buffer.
func (q *Deque) next(i int) int {
    return (i + 1) & (len(q.buf) - 1) // bitwise modulus
}

This particular implementation always uses a buffer size that is a power of 2, and can therefore compute the bitwise modulus to be a little more efficient.

This means the slice needs to grow only when all its capacity is used up. With a resizing strategy that avoids growing and shrinking storage on the same boundary, this makes it very memory efficient.

Here is code that resizes the underlying slice buffer:

// resize resizes the deque to fit exactly twice its current contents. This is
// used to grow the queue when it is full, and also to shrink it when it is     
// only a quarter full.                                                         
func (q *Deque) resize() {
    newBuf := make([]interface{}, q.count<<1)
    if q.tail > q.head {
        copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
    } else {
        n := copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:])
        copy(newBuf[n:], q.buf[:q.tail])
    }
    q.head = 0
    q.tail = q.count
    q.buf = newBuf
}

Another thing to consider is if you want concurrency safety built into the implementation. You may want to avoid this so that you can do whatever works best for your concurrency strategy, and you certainly do not want it if your do not need it; same reason as not wanting a slice that has some built-in serialization.

There are a number of ring-buffer based queue implementations for Go if you do a search on godoc for deque. Choose one that best suits your tastes.

16

Edit, cleaner implementation of a Queue:

package main

import "fmt"

type Queue []interface{}

func (self *Queue) Push(x interface{}) {
    *self = append(*self, x)
}

func (self *Queue) Pop() interface{} {
    h := *self
    var el interface{}
    l := len(h)
    el, *self = h[0], h[1:l]
    // Or use this instead for a Stack
    // el, *self = h[l-1], h[0:l-1]
    return el
}

func NewQueue() *Queue {
    return &Queue{}
}


func main() {
  q := NewQueue()
  q.Push(1)
  q.Push(2)
  q.Push(3)
  q.Push("L")

  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())
  fmt.Println(q.Pop())

}

Or just embed a "container/list" inside a simple implementation and expose the interface:

package queue

import "container/list"

// Queue is a queue
type Queue interface {
    Front() *list.Element
    Len() int
    Add(interface{})
    Remove()
}

type queueImpl struct {
    *list.List
}

func (q *queueImpl) Add(v interface{}) {
    q.PushBack(v)
}

func (q *queueImpl) Remove() {
    e := q.Front()
    q.List.Remove(e)
}

// New is a new instance of a Queue
func New() Queue {
    return &queueImpl{list.New()}
}
2
  • you should check for length 0 and pop nil... otherwise it will panic. Also, this is not thread safe.
    – zed
    Commented Jul 28, 2021 at 9:47
  • 4
    Good catch, checking for length 0 and pop nil is missing. But it not being thread safe is expected, ArrayList for Java or List for c# are not thread safe. Basic collections are not supposed to be thread safe as that hits performance. Commented Aug 3, 2021 at 20:12
12

Either vector or list should work, but vector is probably the way to go. I say this because vector will probably allocate less often than list and garbage collection (in the current Go implementation) is fairly expensive. In a small program it probably won't matter, though.

2
7

To expand on the implementation side, Moraes proposes in his gist some struct from queue and stack:

// Stack is a basic LIFO stack that resizes as needed.
type Stack struct {
    nodes   []*Node
    count   int
}
// Queue is a basic FIFO queue based on a circular list that resizes as needed.
type Queue struct {
    nodes   []*Node
    head    int
    tail    int
    count   int
}

You can see it in action in this playground example.

1
  • That gist is so poorly designed though =/
    – Sir
    Commented Nov 13, 2017 at 1:48
7

Using a slice and an appropriate ("circular") indexing scheme on top still seems to be the way to go. Here's my take on it: https://github.com/phf/go-queue The benchmarks there also confirm that channels are faster, but at the price of more limited functionality.

4
  • 3
    This would be a rather better answer if it excerpted some of the more relevant code from your repo. Commented Apr 22, 2017 at 2:45
  • 2
    I assumed that whoever wanted to see the code would just click the link. Sorry, I am totally new here. I'll update the answer with some snippets. Commented Apr 22, 2017 at 3:01
  • 3
    Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad answer as it is, and certainly isn't going to be deleted as some superficially similar "link-only" answers are, but it could be a bit better than it is with more of the same: explanations of actual code, which are the most important thing for an SO answer. Commented Apr 22, 2017 at 3:03
  • 3
    The funny thing is that posting this answer made me revise the code and now my queue is actually faster than a channel. More meat for a revised answer, coming soon. Commented Apr 22, 2017 at 5:04
7

Unfortunately queues aren't currently part of the go standard library, so you need to write your own / import someone else's solution. It's a shame as containers written outside of the standard library aren't able to use generics.

A simple example of a fixed capacity queue would be:

type MyQueueElement struct {
  blah int // whatever you want
}

const MAX_QUEUE_SIZE = 16
type Queue struct {
  content  [MAX_QUEUE_SIZE]MyQueueElement
  readHead int
  writeHead int
  len int
}

func (q *Queue) Push(e MyQueueElement) bool {
  if q.len >= MAX_QUEUE_SIZE {
    return false
  }
  q.content[q.writeHead] = e
  q.writeHead = (q.writeHead + 1) % MAX_QUEUE_SIZE
  q.len++
  return true
}

func (q *Queue) Pop() (MyQueueElement, bool) {
  if q.len <= 0 {
    return MyQueueElement{}, false
  }
  result := q.content[q.readHead]
  q.content[q.readHead] = MyQueueElement{}
  q.readHead = (q.readHead + 1) % MAX_QUEUE_SIZE
  q.len--
  return result, true
}

Gotchas avoided here include not having unbounded slice growth (caused by using the slice [1:] operation to discard), and zeroing out popped elements to ensure their contents are available for garbage collection. Note, in the case of a MyQueueElement struct containing only an int like here, it will make no difference, but if struct contained pointers it would.

The solution could be extended to reallocate and copy should an auto growing queue be desired.

This solution is not thread safe, but a lock could be added to Push/Pop if that is desired.

Playground https://play.golang.org/

1
  • 1
    This is the best queue impl by wrapping around with mod. the only thing I would add is if "full" you can double the capacity and copy over by unwrapping the circular buffer. There's even an optimization to do it in two "mem copies".
    – bryanmac
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 1:47
5

I also implement the queue from slice as above. However, It's not thread-safe. So I decided to add a lock (mutex lock) to guarantee thread-safe.

package queue

import (
  "sync"
)

type Queue struct {
  lock *sync.Mutex
  Values []int
}

func Init() Queue {
  return Queue{&sync.Mutex{}, make([]int, 0)}
}

func (q *Queue) Enqueue(x int) {
  for {
    q.lock.Lock()
    q.Values = append(q.Values, x)
    q.lock.Unlock()
    return
  }
}

func (q *Queue) Dequeue() *int {
  for {
    if (len(q.Values) > 0) {
      q.lock.Lock()
      x := q.Values[0]
      q.Values = q.Values[1:]
      q.lock.Unlock()
      return &x
    }
    return nil
  }
  return nil
}

You can check my solution on github here simple queue

0
4

you can try something like this,

// queue.go
package queue

type Queue struct {
    data []int
}

func (q *Queue) Enqueue(d int) {
    q.data = append(q.data, d)
}

func (q *Queue) Dequeue() int {
    dequeued := q.data[0]
    q.data = q.data[1:]
    return dequeued
}

func (q *Queue) IsEmpty() bool {
    return len(q.data) == 0
}

func NewQueue() *Queue {
    return &Queue{
        data: make([]int, 0),
    }
}
//queue_test.go

package queue

import (
    "testing"

    "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert"
)

func TestQueue_ShouldInitialiseWithEmpty(t *testing.T) {
    q := NewQueue()
    assert.Equal(t, true, q.IsEmpty())
}

func TestQueue_ShouldErrorIfDequeuePerformedOnEmpty(t *testing.T) {
    q := NewQueue()
    _, err := q.Dequeue()
    assert.NotNil(t, err)
    assert.Equal(t, "nothing to dequeue", err.Error())
}

func TestQueue(t *testing.T) {
    q := NewQueue()
    q.Enqueue(1)
    q.Enqueue(2)
    q.Enqueue(3)
    q.Enqueue(4)

    dequeued1, err1 := q.Dequeue()
    assert.Nil(t, err1)
    assert.Equal(t, 1, dequeued1)

    dequeued2, err2 := q.Dequeue()
    assert.Nil(t, err2)
    assert.Equal(t, 2, dequeued2)

    dequeued3, err3 := q.Dequeue()
    assert.Nil(t, err3)
    assert.Equal(t, 3, dequeued3)

    dequeued4, err4 := q.Dequeue()
    assert.Nil(t, err4)
    assert.Equal(t, 4, dequeued4)
}
3

From Go v1.18 generics have been added which I would use to make a generic queue.

Below are my implementations

type queue[T any] struct {
    bucket []T
}

func newQueue[T any]() *queue[T] {
    return &queue[T]{
        bucket: []T{},
    }
}

func (q *queue[T]) append(input T) {
    q.bucket = append(q.bucket, input)
}

func (q *queue[T]) tryDequeue() (T, bool) {
    if len(q.bucket) == 0 {
        var dummy T
        return dummy, false
    }
    value := q.bucket[0]
    var zero T
    q.bucket[0] = zero // Avoid memory leak
    q.bucket = q.bucket[1:]
    return value, true
}

Whenever dequeue is called the queue is resized to release memory using slicing to avoid copying memory. This isn't thread safe, in those cases channels are probably better - but one needs to know the queues capacity to specify a correct buffer size.

For fun I have made a benchmark run against a queue which uses interface{} - the way to have a generic solution before Go v1.18. The test appends and the dequeues 1, 10, 100 and 1.000 integers. In all cases generics are a lot faster with less memory usages.

Benchmark_queues/QueueGeneric-Size_1-8          38296201                32.78 ns/op            8 B/op          1 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueInterface-Size_1-8        11626666                147.6 ns/op           16 B/op          1 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueGeneric-Size_10-8          7846665                168.2 ns/op          160 B/op          2 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueInterface-Size_10-8        1501284                752.8 ns/op          320 B/op          2 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueGeneric-Size_100-8         1000000                 1088 ns/op         1536 B/op          1 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueInterface-Size_100-8        240232                 6798 ns/op         3072 B/op          1 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueGeneric-Size_1000-8         120244                13468 ns/op        17920 B/op          3 allocs/op
Benchmark_queues/QueueInterface-Size_1000-8        20310                54528 ns/op        35776 B/op          4 allocs/op

The implementation of queue using interface{} are given below - error handling is added which I think is necessary.

type queueInterface struct {
    bucket []interface{}
}

func newQueueInterface() *queueInterface {
    return &queueInterface{
        bucket: []interface{}{},
    }
}

func (q *queueInterface) append(input interface{}) error {
    if len(q.bucket) != 0 && reflect.TypeOf(q.bucket[0]) != reflect.TypeOf(input) {
        return errors.New("input type not same as those already in queue")
    }
    q.bucket = append(q.bucket, input)
    return nil
}

func (q *queueInterface) tryDequeue(out interface{}) (bool, error) {
    if len(q.bucket) == 0 {
        return false, nil
    }

    valuePtr := reflect.ValueOf(out)
    if valuePtr.Kind() != reflect.Ptr {
        return false, errors.New("must be a pointer")
    }

    value := q.bucket[0]
    if valuePtr.Elem().Type() != reflect.TypeOf(value) {
        return false, errors.New("output must be of same type as queue elements")
    }
    valuePtr.Elem().Set(reflect.ValueOf(value))

    var zero interface{}
    q.bucket[0] = zero // Avoid memory leak
    q.bucket = q.bucket[1:]
    return true, nil
}
2
type Queue struct {
    slice []int
    len   int
}
func newq() Queue {
    q := Queue{}
    q.slice = make([]int, 0)
    q.len = 0
    return q
}
func (q *Queue) Add(v int) {
    q.slice = append(q.slice, v)
    q.len++
}

func (q *Queue) PopLeft() int {
    a := q.slice[0]
    q.slice = q.slice[1:]
    q.len--
    return a
}
func (q *Queue) Pop() int {
    a := q.slice[q.len-1]
    q.slice = q.slice[:q.len-1]
    q.len--
    return a
}

For your basic need the code above would do

2

O(1) Time for EnQueue, DeQueue, Front & Rear Lookups O(n) Space for Capacity

type Queue struct {
    front    int
    rear     int
    size     int
    capacity int
    q        []string
}

func (q *Queue) IsFull() bool {
    return q.size == q.capacity
}

func (q *Queue) IsEmpty() bool {
    return q.size == 0
}
func (q *Queue) EnQueue(s string) error {
    if q.IsFull() {
        return fmt.Errorf("queue is full")
    }
    q.rear = (q.rear + 1) % q.capacity
    q.q[q.rear] = s
    q.size++
    return nil
}

func (q *Queue) DeQueue() (string, error) {
    if q.IsEmpty() {
        return "", fmt.Errorf("queue is empty")
    }
    defer func() { q.front, q.size = (q.front+1)%q.capacity, q.size-1 }()
    return q.q[q.front], nil

}

func (q *Queue) Front() (string, error) {
    if q.IsEmpty() {
        return "", fmt.Errorf("queue is empty")
    }
    return q.q[q.front], nil
}

func (q *Queue) Rear() (string, error) {
    if q.IsEmpty() {
        return "", fmt.Errorf("queue is empty")
    }
    return q.q[q.rear], nil
}

func (q *Queue) Print() []string {
    return q.q[q.front : q.rear+1]
}

func New(capacity int) *Queue {
    q := &Queue{
        capacity: capacity,
        rear:     capacity - 1,
        q:        make([]string, capacity),
    }
    return q
}

func main() {
    queue := New(6)
    queue.EnQueue("10")
    queue.EnQueue("20")
    queue.EnQueue("30")
    queue.EnQueue("40")
    queue.EnQueue("50")
    queue.EnQueue("60")
    fmt.Println(queue.EnQueue("70")) // Test Capcacity Exceeded EnQueue.
    fmt.Println(queue.Print())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.Print())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue()) // Test Empty DeQueue.
    fmt.Println(queue.Print())
    queue.EnQueue("80")
    fmt.Println(queue.Print())
    fmt.Println(queue.DeQueue())
    fmt.Println(queue.Print())
}
1

I implemented a queue that will expand the underlying buffer automatically:

package types

// Note: this queue does not shrink the underlying buffer.                                                                                                               
type queue struct {
        buf  [][4]int // change to the element data type that you need                                                                                                   
        head int
        tail int
}

func (q *queue) extend(need int) {
        if need-(len(q.buf)-q.head) > 0 {
                if need-len(q.buf) <= 0 {
                        copy(q.buf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
            q.tail = q.tail - q.head
                        q.head = 0
                        return
                }

                newSize := len(q.buf) * 2
                if newSize == 0 {
                    newSize = 100
            }
                newBuf := make([][4]int, newSize)
                copy(newBuf, q.buf[q.head:q.tail])
                q.buf = newBuf
        q.tail = q.tail - q.head
                q.head = 0
        }
}

func (q *queue) push(p [4]int) {
        q.extend(q.tail + 1)
        q.buf[q.tail] = p
        q.tail++
}

func (q *queue) pop() [4]int {
        r := q.buf[q.head]
        q.head++
        return r
}

func (q *queue) size() int {
        return q.tail - q.head
}


// put the following into queue_test.go
package types

import (
        "testing"

        "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert"
)

func TestQueue(t *testing.T) {
        const total = 1000
        q := &queue{}
        for i := 0; i < total; i++ {
                q.push([4]int{i, i, i, i})
                assert.Equal(t, i+1, q.size())
        }

    for i := 0; i < total; i++ {
                v := q.pop()
                assert.Equal(t, [4]int{i, i, i, i}, v)
                assert.Equal(t, total-1-i, q.size())
        }
}
1

list is enough for queue and stack, what we shoud do is l.Remove(l.Front()) for queue Poll, l.Remove(l.Back())for stack Poll,PushBack for the Add Operation for stack and queue. there are front and back pointer for list, such that time complexity is O(1)

0
0

Double stack implementation:

O(1) Enqueue and Dequeue and uses slices (which tends to be better for cache misses).

type Queue struct{
    enqueue, dequeue Stack
}

func (q *Queue) Enqueue(n *Thing){
    q.enqueue.Push(n)
}

func (q *Queue) Dequeue()(*Thing, bool){
    v, ok := q.dequeue.Pop()
    if ok{
        return v, true
    }

    for {
        v, ok := d.enqueue.Pop()
        if !ok{
            break
        }

        d.dequeue.Push(v)
    }

    return d.dequeue.Pop()
}

type Stack struct{
    v []*Thing
}

func (s *Stack)Push(n *Thing){
    s.v=append(s.v, n)
}

func (s *Stack) Pop()(*Thing, bool){
    if len(s.v) == 0 {
        return nil, false
    }

    lastIdx := len(s.v)-1
    v := s.v[lastIdx]
    s.v=s.v[:lastIdx]
    return v, true
}
0

The simplest way to implement the queue data structure in Golang is to use a slice.

Since a queue follows a FIFO (First-In-First-Out) structure, the dequeue and enqueue operations can be performed as follows:

  • Use the built-in append function to enqueue.
  • Slice off the first element to dequeue.

enter image description here

The following code snippet implements a basic queue using a slice. Note how enqueuing and dequeuing occur at opposite ends of the slice.

package main
import "fmt"

func enqueue(queue[] int, element int) []int {
  queue = append(queue, element); // Simply append to enqueue.
  fmt.Println("Enqueued:", element);
  return queue
}

func dequeue(queue[] int) ([]int) {
  element := queue[0]; // The first element is the one to be dequeued.
  fmt.Println("Dequeued:", element)
  return queue[1:]; // Slice off the element once it is dequeued.
}

func main() {
  var queue[] int; // Make a queue of ints.

  queue = enqueue(queue, 10);
  queue = enqueue(queue, 20);
  queue = enqueue(queue, 30);

  fmt.Println("Queue:", queue);

  queue = dequeue(queue);
  fmt.Println("Queue:", queue);

  queue = enqueue(queue, 40);
  fmt.Println("Queue:", queue);
}

Warning(memory-leaks): In the dequeue function above, the memory allocated for the first element in the array is never returned.

We can use dynamic data structure(linked list) in order to avoid memory leaks. The sample code is given below:

package main
import "container/list"
import "fmt"

func main() {
    // new linked list
    queue := list.New()

    // Simply append to enqueue.
    queue.PushBack(10)
    queue.PushBack(20)
    queue.PushBack(30)

    // Dequeue
    front:=queue.Front()
    fmt.Println(front.Value)
    // This will remove the allocated memory and avoid memory leaks
    queue.Remove(front)
}
-2

Slice can be used to implement queue.

type queue struct {
    values []*int
}

func New() *queue {
   queue := &queue{}
   return queue
}

func (q *queue) enqueue(val *int) {
   q.values = append(q.values, val)
}

//deque function

Update:

here is complete implementation on my GitHub page https://github.com/raiskumar/algo-ds/blob/master/tree/queue.go

7
  • 1
    aand where's dequeue?
    – wingerse
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 12:56
  • Left out implementation intentionally (use enqueue method to understand how dequeue will get implemented) :)
    – rai.skumar
    Commented Jun 29, 2017 at 15:49
  • 1
    you mean q.values = q.values[i:] ? That's gonna waste memory.
    – wingerse
    Commented Jun 29, 2017 at 16:02
  • It wasn't from me.
    – wingerse
    Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 18:06
  • @wingerse slices share memory when slicing and they are implemented as struct with three fields, pointer to array, lenght and cap. Hence the only overhead in memory I see is the creating of a new struct - which is minimal. As I understand when using q.values[i:] you just move the start of the pointer, decrement the length and capacity. Please let me know if there is something I have missed :-)
    – schwartz
    Commented Jul 24, 2022 at 14:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.