-4

I need to create time based “Schedule structure”, with following methods:

Void  addTask(DateTime startTime, int durationInMinutes, TaskObject myObj)
{
   // add TaskObject to calendar structure
}
List<TaskObject> getRunningTasks (DateTime startTime, DateTime endTime)
{
  //this procedure have to efficiently return list of running tasks in specified time frame
}
List<TaskObject> getRunningTasks (DateTime exactTime)
{
    return getRunningTaks(exactTime,exactTime);
}

I have around 60k TaskObjects to count and need to recalculate in hours and minutes (getRunningTasks will be called around ~ 400k times)

For now I use:

public Dictionary<long, Dictionary<int, Dictionary<int, List< TaskObject>>>> scheduleTable;

scheduleTable[dayInTicks][hour][minute]

where I'm adding all matching tasks to each hour and minute, where they are scheduled.

Idea from DrKoch

    public class TaskList
    {
        private SortedDictionary<DateTime, TaskObject> startTimes;
        private SortedDictionary<DateTime, TaskObject> endTimes;
        private SortedSet<DateTime> startTimeIndexes;
        private SortedSet<DateTime> endTimeIndexes;
        public TaskList()
        {
            reset();
        }
        public void addTask(TaskObject taskToAdd, DateTime startTime, int durationInMinutes)
        {
            // start time
            while (startTimes.ContainsKey(startTime))
            {
                startTime = startTime.AddTicks(1);
            }
            startTimes.Add(startTime, taskToAdd);
            startTimeIndexes.Add(startTime);
            //end time
            DateTime endTime = startTime.AddMinutes(durationInMinutes);
            while (endTimes.ContainsKey(endTime))
            {
                endTime = endTime.AddTicks(1);
            }
            endTimes.Add(endTime, taskToAdd);
            endTimeIndexes.Add(endTime);
        }
        public List<TaskObject> getRunningTasks(DateTime startTime, DateTime endTime)
        {
            DateTime fromBeginingOfDay = new DateTime(endTime.Year, endTime.Month, endTime.Day);
            SortedSet<DateTime> myEndTimeIndexes =  endTimeIndexes.GetViewBetween(fromBeginingOfDay, startTime); // tasks, that already finished during specified day
            SortedSet<DateTime> myStartTimeIndexes = endTimeIndexes.GetViewBetween(fromBeginingOfDay, endTime);  // tasks, that started from the beginig of the day
            List<TaskObject> result = new List<TaskObject>();
            // Fill result with all matching tasks
            foreach (DateTime myStartTimeIndex in myStartTimeIndexes)
            {
                result.Add(startTimes[myStartTimeIndex]);
            }
            // Remove finished tasks from result
            foreach (DateTime myEndTimeIndex in myEndTimeIndexes)
            {
                if (result.Contains(endTimes[myEndTimeIndex]))
                {
                    result.Remove(startTimes[myEndTimeIndex]);
                }
            }
            return result;
        }
        public List<TaskObject> getRunningTasks(DateTime exactTime)
        {
            return getRunningTasks(exactTime, exactTime.addSeconds(1));
        }
        public void reset()
        {
            startTimes = new SortedDictionary<DateTime, TaskObject>();
            endTimes = new SortedDictionary<DateTime, TaskObject>();
            startTimeIndexes = new SortedSet<DateTime>();
            endTimeIndexes = new SortedSet<DateTime>();
        }
    }
    public class TaskObject
    {
        public string Name;
        public TaskObject(string name)
        {
            Name = name;
        }
    }
5
  • It is not clear what you are asking. Is task an object of yours or a OS-Task or a thread?
    – DrKoch
    Jan 28, 2015 at 9:43
  • TaskObject is my own object type. To simplify, you can consider it as string
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 9:45
  • 2
    So you have a long list of objects with two properties startTime and endTime and want to know which objects overlap a given time interval?
    – DrKoch
    Jan 28, 2015 at 9:54
  • Exactly as you mentioned startTime and duration (endTime)
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 9:55
  • 1
    So, please change your question to make clear what you are asking. And illustrate with minimal code. No need to talk about calendar, tasks etc. Just something: Fastest way to find intervalls which contain a given point in time
    – DrKoch
    Jan 28, 2015 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

16

Let's say you store your task in a class like this:

public class MyTask
{
    public string name;
    public DateTime startDt;
    public DateTime endDt;
    // ...
}

The basic idea is to maintain two collections with tasks, one ordered by startDt the scond by endDt.

We are going to use SortedSet for two reasons:

  1. it has a computational complexity of O(log n) for insertion and search. If you face a problem with many items it is very desireable to have a complexity better than O(n).

  2. it allows to return all items in a certain "range". No need to know the exact "keys" for retrieval as in a Dictionary

Because all items in a SortedSet are unique and because several tasks may have the same startDt or endDt we can't store tasks directly in the SortedSet instead we maintain a "bucket" of all tasks with the same time:

public class SameTimeTaskList
{
    public DateTime time; // common start or end time of all tasks in list
    public List<MyTask> taskList = new List<MyTask>();
}

The sort criterion for this is time of course:

// Defines a comparer to create a sorted set 
// that is sorted by time. 
public class ByTime : IComparer<SameTimeTaskList>
{
    public int Compare(SameTimeTaskList x, SameTimeTaskList y)
    {
        return x.time.CompareTo(y.time);
    }
}

With this we can build our two Sorted Sets:

SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> startTimeSet = 
  new SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList>(new ByTime());
SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> endTimeSet = 
  new SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList>(new ByTime());

A new task is inserted in both sets. If no bucket for this timeexists a new bucket is created. Otherwise the task is simply added to the correct bucket:

    public void Add(MyTask task)
    {
        // startTimeSet
        refTime.time = task.startDt;
        var lst = startTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime,
            refTime).FirstOrDefault();
        if (lst == null) // no bucket found for time
        {
            lst = new SameTimeTaskList { time = task.startDt };
            startTimeSet.Add(lst);
        }
        lst.taskList.Add(task); // add task to bucket
        // endTimeSet
        refTime.time = task.endDt;
        lst = endTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime,
            refTime).FirstOrDefault();
        if (lst == null) // no bucket found for time
        {
            lst = new SameTimeTaskList { time = task.endDt };
            endTimeSet.Add(lst);
        }
        lst.taskList.Add(task); // add task to bucket
    }

Now it is easy to get all intervalls which are active at a certain exactTime. Each task must meet two conditions:

task.startDt <= exactTime
&&
task.endDt >= exactTime

We check both SortedSets to see which returns the smaller set for one condition. Then we check all tasks in the smaller set if it matches the second condition:

    public IEnumerable<MyTask> Get(DateTime exactTime)
    {
        refTime.time = exactTime;
        // set of all tasks started before exactTime
        SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> sSet =
           startTimeSet.GetViewBetween(minTime, refTime);
        // set of all tasks ended after exactTime
        SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> eSet =
           endTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime, maxTime);

        List<MyTask> result = new List<MyTask>();
        if (sSet.Count < eSet.Count) // check smaller set for 2nd condition
        {
            foreach (var tl in sSet)
                foreach (MyTask tsk in tl.taskList)
                    if(tsk.endDt >= exactTime) result.Add(tsk);
        }
        else // eSet is smaller
        {
            foreach (var tl in eSet)
                foreach (MyTask tsk in tl.taskList)
                    if (tsk.startDt <= exactTime) result.Add(tsk);

        }
        return result;
    }

Here is the complete code as a working Program:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace IntervallsTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            DateTime exactDate = DateTime.Parse("2015-6-1");

            var tc = new TaskCollection();
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T1", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-1-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-02-01") });
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T2", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-1-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-07-01") });
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T2a", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-1-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-07-02") });
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T3", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-05-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-12-31") });
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T3a", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-04-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-12-31") });
            tc.Add(new MyTask { name = "T4", startDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-12-1"), endDt = DateTime.Parse("2015-12-31") });

            var result = tc.Get(exactDate);

            Console.WriteLine("These tasks are active at " + exactDate);
            foreach (var tsk in result)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(tsk.name);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("press any key");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    public class TaskCollection
    {
        SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> startTimeSet = new SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList>(new ByTime());
        SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> endTimeSet = new SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList>(new ByTime());

        static SameTimeTaskList refTime = new SameTimeTaskList();
        static SameTimeTaskList minTime = new SameTimeTaskList { time = DateTime.MinValue };
        static SameTimeTaskList maxTime = new SameTimeTaskList { time = DateTime.MaxValue };

        public void Add(MyTask task)
        {
            // startTimeSet
            refTime.time = task.startDt;
            var lst = startTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime, refTime).FirstOrDefault();
            if (lst == null) // no bucket found for time
            {
                lst = new SameTimeTaskList { time = task.startDt };
                startTimeSet.Add(lst);
            }
            lst.taskList.Add(task); // add task to bucket
            // endTimeSet
            refTime.time = task.endDt;
            lst = endTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime, refTime).FirstOrDefault();
            if (lst == null) // no bucket found for time
            {
                lst = new SameTimeTaskList { time = task.endDt };
                endTimeSet.Add(lst);
            }
            lst.taskList.Add(task); // add task to bucket
        }

        public IEnumerable<MyTask> Get(DateTime exactTime)
        {
            refTime.time = exactTime;
            // set of all tasks started before exactTime
            SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> sSet = startTimeSet.GetViewBetween(minTime, refTime);
            // set of all tasks ended after exactTime
            SortedSet<SameTimeTaskList> eSet = endTimeSet.GetViewBetween(refTime, maxTime);

            List<MyTask> result = new List<MyTask>();
            if (sSet.Count < eSet.Count) // check smaller set for 2nd condition
            {
                foreach (var tl in sSet)
                    foreach (MyTask tsk in tl.taskList)
                        if(tsk.endDt >= exactTime) result.Add(tsk);
            }
            else // eSet is smaller
            {
                foreach (var tl in eSet)
                    foreach (MyTask tsk in tl.taskList)
                        if (tsk.startDt <= exactTime) result.Add(tsk);

            }
            return result;
        }
    }

    public class MyTask
    {
        public string name;
        public DateTime startDt;
        public DateTime endDt;
        // ...
    }

    public class SameTimeTaskList
    {
        public DateTime time; // common start or end time of all tasks in list
        public List<MyTask> taskList = new List<MyTask>();
    }

    // Defines a comparer to create a sorted set 
    // that is sorted by time. 
    public class ByTime : IComparer<SameTimeTaskList>
    {
        public int Compare(SameTimeTaskList x, SameTimeTaskList y)
        {
            return x.time.CompareTo(y.time);
        }
    }
}

I'd be very interested to see the benchmark results when you compare this with all the other versions you've tried.

1
  • Even I have not adopted rest of my core engine for this perfectly, I'm getting much better results! After complete implementation I expect almost zero latency. Thanks a lot!
    – Laky
    Jan 30, 2015 at 11:38
0

This problem is similar to the selecting two-dimensional points, falling within the specified rectangle. Unfortunately, it can't be solved directly by using a binary search.

The main way to solve this problem: divine the "plain" into squares. A small example:

// minDate means minimal possible date
// maxDate means maximal possible date
// interval means a unit of division in days, f.e. 10 or 30
var size = (maxDate.Subtract(minDate).Days + interval)/interval;
var tasks = new List<Task>[size, size]();

// for each new task:
var startDate = ...
var endDate = ...
var x = (startDate.Subtract(minDate).Days + interval)/interval;
var y = (endDate.Subtract(minDate).Days + interval)/interval;

if (tasks[x, y] == null)
    tasks[x, y] = new List<Task>();

tasks[x, y].Add(newTask);

// search
var startPeriod = ...
var endPeriod = ...
var minIndex = (startPeriod.Subtract(minDate).Days + interval)/interval;
var maxIndex = (endPeriod.Subtract(minDate).Days + interfal)/interval;

for (int x = minIndex + 1; x < maxIndex - 1; x++)
    for (int y = minIndex + 1; y < maxIndex - 1; y++)
        tasks[x, y] ... // All these tasks are yours

for (int x = minIndex; x < maxIndex; x++)
    foreach(var task in tasks[x, minIndex])
        if (task.startDate >= startPeriod && task.endDate <= endPeriod)
            ... // All these tasks also are yours

// Repeat last for/foreach for every boundary interval, since not all tasks
// may be yours there
...

Inside boundary "squares" you look for required tasks with brute force. If it's too slow, you can use SortedList instead of List. It will reduce the time of brute forcing, but not get rid on it completely.

5
  • Thanks Mark. I implemented similar straight forward solution which is nice and clean, but not for 400k search calls over 30k tasks... Anyway this is nice example for someone, who does not need to call search so frequently.
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 12:06
  • What is the size of the result list? I mean, use you large intervals, and how many tasks can be selected as the same time? If the number of selected tasks is about 1000, I think, the problem is unsolvable with so many requests. Fast solution is possible, if every time you expect about 10 tasks. Perhaps the solution lies in another plan. What may do the end-user, receiving 1000 tasks? What is expected scenario? Perhaps he need himself tasks only, or tasks of this immediate subordinates? If the size of selection is small, it's possible to look for suitable data structure and algorithm. Jan 28, 2015 at 13:08
  • In fact I'm creating scheduler for backups which are saved to destinations. Due it is really badly balanced now, each destination have 0~1000 backups assigned. Duration of backup also wary from 1 min to several hours. Moreover some backups are reoccurring (repeat every x minutes) Scheduler output should show tape library usage in table view where rows represent destinations and columns time aggregated by hours. After selected hour table redraws to minutes for particular hour. My current algorithm can count it in <5 sec, which quite fine, but would like to speed up...
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 13:40
  • Yes, I understand. I though what we're talking about 400K simultaneous search calls from different users. So you need not the list of tasks, but their number in the range? Jan 28, 2015 at 15:29
  • I also need the list of tasks. First information is the number, second is real tasks hidden by the number.
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 15:37
0

Remark: See my second answer for a more complete solution.


You could build two additional sorted dictionaries:

SortedDictionary<DateTime, Task> startTimes; // startTime -> Task
SortedDictionary<DateTime, Task> endTimes;   // endTime -> Task

These Dictinaries allow fast (O(log N)) access to all Tasks which start before exactTime and end after exactTime

The intersection of these sets is what you are looking for.


The better collection is SortedSet it has a

SortedSet<T>.GetViewBetween()

method which does all you need: it can return all Tasks in startTimesSet with startTime before exactTime.

8
  • how can I get values from SortedDictionary, where time is greater (or less) than specified?
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 10:46
  • See my edited answer: If you need it fast (O(log n)) you'll need to implement a binary search on the key collection of the Dictionary.
    – DrKoch
    Jan 28, 2015 at 10:47
  • How can I get that binary result? Can you provide me with example of syntax returning values with time greater than startTime? We can change TateTime with long representing DateTime in ticks. Anyway How can I query directory to get values greater than number?
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 10:52
  • I think this is good Idea: get all tasks which started before EndTime and remove tasks which finished before StartTime. What I'm afraid is if removal will not take too long (as it must be done in loop?), especially with 60K tasks What I finally need is some "SpecialDictionary" class with GetViewBetween() integration. I will do some performance tests and update here.
    – Laky
    Jan 28, 2015 at 12:17
  • With SortedSet you get all tasks which start before exactTime in a single O(log n) operation. (no removal!) same vor end after exactTime. The do some clever intersection (which tasks are in both sets).
    – DrKoch
    Jan 28, 2015 at 12:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.