6

I have an abstract java class "BaseOperation". This class only has a single abstract method:

public abstract T execute()
{
    ...

    return T;
}

Subclasses of BaseOperation must implement this method:

public class GetUsersOperation extends BaseOperation<GetUsersResponse>
{
    ...

    @Override
    public GetUsersResponse execute()
    {

        ...

        return GetUsersResponse;
    }

}

This is a great way to put all common "operation" logic in the BaseOperation class, but still have every concrete subclass's execute() method have a different return type.

Now I need to change this structure to allow the execute() methods to have a variable amount of arguments. For example, one concrete subclass would require:

execute(String, int)

and another would need:

execute(Date, Date, String)

This is tricky, because the execute method is declared in the base class. Simply overloading the execute methods in the base is not ideal. Firstly, the amount of overloads would be huge. Secondly, every subclass will only ever use one of the execute methods, what's the point of all the others?

The (in my opinion) easiest solution would be to declare the execute method with varargs:

execute(Object... arguments)

And then downcast all arguments in the subclasses:

execute(Object... arguments)
{
    String s = (String) arguments[0];
    ...
}

Obviously this has 2 major downsides:

  • Reduced performance because of all the downcasting operations
  • Calling the execute() methods is no longer strictly typed because any amount of objects can be passed witout compiler warnings.

Are there patterns or other solutions that could don't have these disadvantages?

3

As already said, the common approach for solving your issue is using a bean holding parameters. But here is another solution, based on a builder approach:

public interface BaseOperation<T> {
   public T execute();
}

public class AddOperation implements BaseOperation<Integer> {
   private int a, b;

   public void setA(int arg){
     a = arg ;
     return this;
   }

   public void setB(int arg){
     b = arg;
     return this;
   }

   @Override
   public Integer execute() {
     return a+b ;
   }
}

And then use it like this :

new AddOperation().setA(1).setB(2).execute();

You can mix required and optional parameters in this way:

public class MultipleAddOperation implements BaseOperation<Integer> {
  private int sum ;

  public MultipleAddOperation(int requiredInt){
    sum = requiredInt;
  }

  public void add(int optionalInt){
    sum += optionalInt ;
    return this;
  }

  @Override
  public Integer execute(){
    return sum;
  }
}

And so:

new MultipleAddOperation(5).add(1).add(2).execute();
  • I like how he logic regarding the required input is coded as attributes (fields) of the subclass itself (with necessary set methods), rather than as a separate bean class. However, there is nothing preventing me from calling execute() without having set the appropiate parameters. Can this be solved? – user1884155 Jan 28 '15 at 10:07
  • @user1884155 Yes, passing argument in the operation constructor, see my edit ;) – NiziL Jan 28 '15 at 10:14
  • Ah, obviously. I prefer this solution over the 'simple' javabean solution because all my parameters are required and I don't want to introduce an additional bean class for every operation class I make. Thanks! – user1884155 Jan 28 '15 at 10:27
5

You could use a bean holding the parameters:

public interface BaseOperation<T, U> {
    T execute(U input);
}

public class GetUsersOperation implements BaseOperation<GetUsersResponse, UserInput> {

    @Override
    public GetUsersResponse execute(UserInput input) {
        Date date = input.getDate();
        return new GetUsersResponse(date);
    }

}

Your abstract class only has one single abstract method: better use an interface. You can implement several interfaces while you can extend only one class.

  • Thank you for the prompt reply. My base class has other methods, but it only has 1 PUBLIC method. All the other private/protected methods are not abstract and do the common work such as logging, parsing messages etc. Interfaces cannot have actual code in java 1.7 so I think turning it to an interface is not possible. Or am I wrong on this subject? – user1884155 Jan 28 '15 at 10:10
  • @user1884155 No, you're right, I thought it only had one single abstract method. – sp00m Jan 28 '15 at 10:27
  • 1
    Curious as to why one would prefer a bean rather than just a class with multiple constructors? With overloaded constructors you can avoid all the extra lines setting the params, and also provide some indication of acceptable parameter combinations and required values. – Blegger Aug 3 '17 at 16:15
  • @Blegger That's a good point, I would probably proposed a constructor based approach nowadays. I guess that's why the other answer has been accepted (although I would have used a constructor to make fields final instead of setters like proposed). – sp00m Aug 3 '17 at 16:27

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