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I'm creating NuGet package which will allow its consumers to easily send/receive messages from Azure topics/queues (plus some specific for my needs additional logic).
Package internal structure is pretty complicated with a lot of dependencies and is planned to be covered with unit tests, thus there was a decision to use IoC container (Unity).

The problem is that this package has several entry points (e.g. one class in the top of objects graph for manipulations with topics, another class for manipulations with queues, etc).

I read a lot of similar articles about IoC and everywhere it is saying that correct way of using it is to register/resolve/release container at the composition root (e.g. in Main method in case of Console apps). But what to do if we have multiple entry points (and package consumer should know nothing about internal package structure)?

I was thinking about two solutions, and both of them doesn't look very good...

Solution #1:
Create additional public "helper" class which consumers will use. For each "entry point" configure separate container and construct needed objects using "register/resolve/release" pattern each time when they needed:

public class FooHelper
{
    public static ITopicFoo CreateTopicManager()
    {
        IUnityContainer _container = new UnityContainer()
            .RegisterType<ITopicFoo, TopicFoo>()
            .RegisterType<ILotOtherDependencies, OtherDependencies>;

        var topic = _container.Resolve<ITopicFoo>();

        _container.Dispose();

        return topic;
    }

    public static IQueueFoo CreateQueueManager()
    {
        IUnityContainer _container = new UnityContainer()
            .RegisterType<IQueueFoo, QueueFoo>()
            .RegisterType<ILotOtherDependencies, OtherDependencies>;

        var queue = _container.Resolve<IQueueFoo>();

        _container.Dispose();

        return queue;
    }
}

Solution #2:
Create additional public "helper" class which consumers will use. Configure container with all info, preserve it in static property and use it to construct objects when needed.
This looks little bit as ServiceLocator anti-pattern, but not much (no one knows about this container except helper class itself):

public class FooHelper
{
    private static readonly IUnityContainer _container;

    static FooHelper()
    {
        IUnityContainer _container = new UnityContainer()
            .RegisterType<ITopicFoo, TopicFoo>()
            .RegisterType<IQueueFoo, QueueFoo>()
            .RegisterType<ILotOtherDependencies, OtherDependencies>;
    }

    public static ITopicFoo CreateTopicManager()
    {
        return _container.Resolve<ITopicFoo>();
    }

    public static IQueueFoo CreateQueueManager()
    {
        return _container.Resolve<IQueueFoo>();
    }
}

Are any of these solution good in terms of design? Is there any other way to nicely handle this situation?
Or maybe this whole design is not very good?

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At the end, after reading Mark Seemann's blog post I decided to not use IoC container inside my NuGet package at all.

Instead, I've designed my NuGet package in a DI-friendly way (so package consumers still can use IoC approach to construct needed objects from their composition roots).
For package consumers which don't want to care about IoC I've prepared helper classes which just construct needed objects (like "TopicManager" or "QueueManager" from my code examples above) in default way by using usual "new-new-..." approach.

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