4

I sometimes find myself in a situation, where I want to express a type, which is a subtype of an inbuild class (e.g. a Wiforms control) and also implements a custom interface. I have several such classes that otherwise have no relation to each other. I use generics in these cases. Here is a simplified example:

interface IDescription
{
  string GetDescription();
}

...

private string getDescription<T>(T control) where T : System.Windows.Forms.Control, IDescription
{
  return control.Name + control.GetDescription();
}

However this seems like a little unconventional use of generics, because generics are usually used to write type agnostic code (like generic containers). In this code on the other hand generics are used solely because the lack of sufficient type expression.

My question is: Is this an abuse of generics? Are there any better way to write such code?

UPDATE 1

As Frank Hileman pointed out in this example adding the Name property to the interface would make this a non-issue. Let me add an other example:

private string getDescription<T>(T control) where T : System.Windows.Forms.Control, IDescription
{
  return getData(control) + control.GetDescription();
}

private string getData(System.Windows.Forms.Control control)
{
  ...
}

UPDATE 2

Please note that adding a base class is sometimes not possible. For example:

There maybe a custom class subclassing TreeNode and an other one subclassing DataGridView.

4
  • Another thing you could do would be write an extension method on Object. – Steven Behnke Jan 28 '15 at 22:00
  • 8
    Seems okay to me. – Matt Burland Jan 28 '15 at 22:00
  • @StevenBehnke Please note that in the implementation of the function both the fact that it is a control and that it is of type IDescription are used. If I wrote an extenson methon for an obejt I could not do that. – Gábor Angyal Jan 28 '15 at 22:03
  • Oh right. Then no, how you've done it is close to the only way you could do it. – Steven Behnke Jan 28 '15 at 22:04
4

No, it is not. The fact that generics are used to create generic containers, etc. does not mean that's the only use case of generics.

In this case, since your method does the same thing for different types that implements a common interface, it's completely fine and is not an abuse.

3
  • Most probably you are right, but continers were just an example. There is the swap function in c++ stl, what changes the value of two references without having any information about the type. Or there are several cases when the type parameter is used in the return type. My example wuld actually work, if ther were a sufficient base class for example. That caused my doubt. – Gábor Angyal Jan 28 '15 at 22:19
  • @GáborAngyal ofcourse, there might be different ways to achieve this. if you want to add a base type and you think it's more appropriate (maybe you wanna implement some common functionality in there) then you are free to go that way. but if there is no need for a base class then using generics is a perfectly fine solution.. to me at least. – Selman Genç Jan 28 '15 at 22:25
  • It is sometimes not possible to add a base class. See update 2. – Gábor Angyal Jan 28 '15 at 22:35
1

While it is not a better way, another way to write the getDescription method is to write a non-generic method taking either a Control or IDescription as input, and performing a dynamic cast to obtain a view on the instance as a different data type. However, now any type errors will occur at run-time instead of at compile time. If you are sure that all IDescription are also controls, it would work.

Another option is to put a Name property in IDescription, and use IDescription only.

2
  • The first method would sacrifice type safety, I don't like that. The other one seems ok. – Gábor Angyal Jan 28 '15 at 22:21
  • @GáborAngyal Yes that was why I did not like the first one either. For your second example, my solutions apply the same way. The first solution is a dynamic cast when calling getData. The second solution is to put the methods/properties needed in getData into IDescription (or an inherited interface), and use only that as a getData parameter. – Frank Hileman Jan 29 '15 at 0:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.