7

I built a WCF service and there's a section that looks like this:

[ServiceContract]
public class Service {
    [OperationContract]
    public SomethingElse[] Method(Code a, params Something[] b) { ... }
}

[DataContract]
public class Something {
    [DataMember]
    public string Stuff {get;set;}
    [DataMember]
    public Status MyStatus {get;set;}
    public string ServerSideField {get;set;}
}

[DataContract]
public class SomethingElse {
    [DataMember]
    public Status MyStatus {get;set;}
}

[DataContract]
public enum Status {
    [EnumMember] WorksFine,
    [EnumMember] NotWorking
}

[DataContract]
public enum Code {
    [EnumMember] TypeA,
    [EnumMember] TypeB
}

Now I am using it as a service reference for a C# client. For some reason, whenever I call Method, the MyStatus property inside the b parameter is always set to WorksFine, even if I set it to NotWorking. On the other hand, whenever I pass Code.TypeA or Code.TypeB for the a argument, the service always deserializes it correctly.

For the sake of due diligence, other posts on the subject of passing enums to WCF services refer to DataContract, EnumMember(Value="TypeA"), and ServiceKnownType so I gave all of those a shot. However, even when I use ServiceKnownType (like below), I am still encountering the same problem.

[ServiceContract]
[ServiceKnownType(typeof(Something)]
[ServiceKnownType(typeof(Status)]
public class Service {
    [OperationContract]
    public SomethingElse[] Method(Code a, params Something[] b) { ... }
}

This issue seems unusually obscure for something so basic. I tested passing back Status.NotWorking from the service as well and the client is able to see it, so this appears to be a one-way issue. Any suggestions?

EDIT 1:

Similar issue: WCF not deserializing value types. Mysterious behaviour

EDIT 2:

Judging from the lack of immediate response, I am going to include some more information in case some of it sticks.

  • I'm experiencing this problem on both .NET 4.5 and 4.0.
  • The service is hosted on IIS, has SSL, and custom authentication scheme.
  • There is also a FaultContract attribute on Method but I excluded it to make the example simpler.
  • Event Viewer says zilch. So does IIS logs.
  • Auto-generated service reference code in Reference.cs looks like this:

The enum:

/// <remarks/>
[System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Xml", "4.0.30319.18408")]
[System.SerializableAttribute()]
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlTypeAttribute(Namespace="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/Service")]
public enum Status{ TypeA, TypeB }

The method:

// CODEGEN: Parameter 'MethodResult' requires additional schema information that cannot be captured using the parameter mode. The specific attribute is 'System.Xml.Serialization.XmlArrayAttribute'.
    [System.ServiceModel.OperationContractAttribute(Action="http://tempuri.org/Service/Method", ReplyAction="http://tempuri.org/Service/MethodResponse")]
    [System.ServiceModel.FaultContractAttribute(typeof(MyClientProject.Service.MyFault), Action="http://tempuri.org/Service/MethodMyFaultFault", Name="MyFault", Namespace="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/Service.MyFault")]
    [System.ServiceModel.XmlSerializerFormatAttribute(SupportFaults=true)]
    MyClientProject.Service.Method Method(MyClientProject.Service.MethodRequest request);

EDIT 3:

I built another web service consisting of just the code above, but it does NOT reproduce the behavior that I am seeing. My conjecture is that either some other code is zilching the DataContractSerializer, OR there is some relevant IIS/WCF setting, OR some unresolved data contract issues.

I also built another web client that connects to both webservices, and it is receiving the same results as the first.

EDIT 4

Intercepted request with Fiddler and it looked like this:

<s:Envelope xmlns:s="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
<s:Body xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
<Method xmlns="http://tempuri.org/">
<a>TypeA</a>
<b><Something xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/TestService.Something">
   <Stuff>mystuffvalue</Stuff>
</Something></b>
</Method>
</s:Body>
</s:Envelope>

So the enum is never being passed after all! How do I fix this contract mismatch?

EDIT 5

Forgot to mention that the web service had a reference to an ASMX service and was itself using XML serializer to communicate with that external service.

6
  • Have you tried running your data classes through DataContractSerializer to see what is actually getting serialized? Also have you tried leaving off attributes from the enum entirely?
    – Erik
    Jan 28 '15 at 23:11
  • I never looked at DataContractSerializer, and I have not tried leaving off attributes from the enum. I'll give both a try.
    – stephen
    Jan 28 '15 at 23:52
  • OK, so I've now tried using [OnDeserializing] to look at the state when Something is deserializing. But the MyStatus property is still defaulting to its default value. Is there a more useful way of looking at deserialization?
    – stephen
    Jan 29 '15 at 0:02
  • Also removing the attributes on the enum makes it kind of impossible to pass in the required parameter.
    – stephen
    Jan 29 '15 at 0:07
  • 1
    Try using BasicHttpBinding and catch the request on the wire using Fiddler or similar. Post that, tinker with the request format, and send it to the service again. This is very likely a contract mismatch type of issue. Jan 29 '15 at 0:15
2

The key is here:

[System.ServiceModel.XmlSerializerFormatAttribute(SupportFaults=true)]

The XML Serializer is being used to generate the proxy instead of the DataContractSerializer. Did you accidentally specify the XmlSerializer? Are you trying to use an .asmx service?

Once you figure out what is causing the code to be generated using the XmlSerializer you'll have your answer, but it's not immediately evident from what you have posted.

2

For some unknown reason, the SOAP request made by the client was omitting the enum values that I needed, and consequently the server serialized those enums to their default values (the first enum definition on the list).

I fixed this issue by making omitted parameters required for the request body. This is the code that fixed it:

[DataContract]
public class Something {
    [DataMember]
    public string Stuff {get;set;}
    [DataMember(IsRequired=true)] // just this 1 simple change!
    public Status MyStatus {get;set;}
    public string ServerSideField {get;set;}
}
7
  • 1
    This smells like an asmx service. You should use a service reference. Jan 30 '15 at 19:34
  • I did. However, in the actual implementation of the web service, the web service had a reference to an ASMX webservice. Perhaps it leaked through somehow?
    – stephen
    Jan 30 '15 at 19:37
  • I looked at your other post. The XmlElement attribute is forcing .NET to use the XML Serializer. If you remove those your enums will start working. What you have posted here is a sly workaround. Jan 30 '15 at 19:40
  • Bingo. I just looked at that ASMX web service inside my web service, and there are all sorts of XmlElement attributes in the reference.cs. Next time I won't forget to mention the asmx reference :)
    – stephen
    Jan 30 '15 at 19:48
  • 2
    If the public contract doesn't include any xml serializer-specific directives, like those attributes, then I'm fairly certain the DataContractSerializer can still be used. If it isn't, then it's a configuration issue or your data types are structured in a way the DataContractSerializer doesn't support. Jan 30 '15 at 22:26

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