I have a jQuery event on an element in a directive’s link function. I want to modify a scope variable in that event callback. It’d not working- the template that renders that variable never updates:

joyableApp.directive('foobar', [function() {
  var FoobarLink = function(scope, element, attrs){
    scope.foo = 'bar';
    element.click(function(){
      console.log("clicked!");
      scope.foo = 'clicked_result';
    });
  };
  return {
    template: '<div>foo = {{foo}}</div>',
    scope: {},
    link: FoobarLink
  }
}]);

In this example, I’m trying to update scope.foo when the directive element is clicked. However, when I run this and click the element, the template is not updated from bar to clicked_result. I suspect I’m missing something fundamental about how link and scope work here.

Some unrelated backstory, just in case it helps: I’m trying to create a directive that would go on an <input> field. When you focus on this input field, it’ll display a popup tooltip. So the interface to use the directive would look like <input input-tooltip content=‘some tooltip content here’>. However, to do that, I need the directive to listen on the root element for focus events. The only way I can find to do that is to use a jQuery event on the element passed in to the link function. However, in the callback for the focus event on that event, I can’t seem to successfully modify scope variables.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$scope.foo will not be refreshed until Angular runs into digest loop, which is the so called dirty check. In directive, you need to manually trigger a digest loop youself, like below

scope.$apply(function () {
  scope.foo = 'clicked_result';
});

But you might run into Error: $digest already in progress, so you'd better use evalAsync or applyAsync to trigger a safe digest cycle,like

scope.$evalAsync(function () {
  scope.foo = 'clicked_result';
});

wrap the DOM manipulation in a $timeout.

  element.click(function(){
    console.log("clicked!");
    $timeout(function () {
      scope.foo = 'clicked_result';
    },0);

  });

The $timeout will cause a safe digest cycle to begin. Don't forget to inject $timeout:

joyableApp.directive('foobar', ['$timeout', function($timeout) {

Hope this helps.

  element.click(function(){
    console.log("clicked!");
    scope.$apply(function () {
      scope.foo = 'clicked_result';
    });

  });

Using $apply is appropriate here and doesn't require injection of $timeout. In my experience, $timeout is useful only in situations where you modify the DOM in the link function and need to wait for angular to compile the added elements.

  • The danger in using apply is you can't verify angular is not in a digest cycle when using it, unless you use $$phase, which is not supposed to be used as it's a 'private' property. Mishko has offered the $timeout as the best-practice way of doing a safe apply. – Aviv Shaked Jan 29 '15 at 6:50
  • There is no "danger" in this case, and the best practice is in fact to use $apply. Angular itself uses $apply for all but 2 of the 16 ng-{{event}} directives, and use evalAsync in those two cases primarily to address browser differences. Mishko's advice applies primarily to situations where you're not sure whether you are in a digest cycle or not, which almost invariably means you've already fallen victim to an anti-pattern. The only times I've found $timeout truly necessary were when trying to wrap jQuery plugins into directives (an anti pattern in an of itself). – Joe Enzminger Jan 29 '15 at 16:19

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