38

In one of my tests, I want to ensure that a collection has certain items. Therefore, I want to compare this collection with the items of an expected collection not regarding the order of the items. Currently, my test code looks somewhat like this:

[Fact]
public void SomeTest()
{
    // Do something in Arrange and Act phase to obtain a collection
    List<int> actual = ...

    // Now the important stuff in the Assert phase
    var expected = new List<int> { 42, 87, 30 };
    Assert.Equal(expected.Count, actual.Count);
    foreach (var item in actual)
        Assert.True(expected.Contains(item));
}

Is there any easier way to achieve this in xunit.net? I can't use Assert.Equal as this method checks if the order of the items is the same in both collections. I had a look at Assert.Collection but that doesn't remove the Assert.Equal(expected.Count, actual.Count) statement in the code above.

6 Answers 6

34

Brad Wilson from xunit.net told me in this Github Issue that one should use LINQ's OrderBy operator and afterwards Assert.Equal to verify that two collections contain equal items without regarding their order. Of course, you would have to have a property on the corresponding item class that you can use for ordering in the first place (which I didn't really have in my case).

Personally, I solved this problem by using FluentAssertions, a library that provides a lot of assertion methods that can be applied in a fluent style. Of course, there are also a lot of methods that you can use to validate collections.

In the context of my question, I would use something like the following code:

[Fact]
public void Foo()
{
    var first = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
    var second = new[] { 3, 2, 1 };

    first.Should().BeEquivalentTo(second);
}

This test passes because the BeEquivalentTo call ignores the order of the items.

Shouldly is also a good alternative if you do not want to go with FluentAssertions.

1
  • Names that end with -ly or -ify .... let's boycott them. Jun 4 at 3:28
15

Not a Xunit, but a Linq answer :

bool areSame = !expected.Except(actual).Any() && expected.Count == actual.Count;

So in XUnit :

Assert.True(!expected.Except(actual).Any() && expected.Count == actual.Count));

As @robi-y said, in Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework there is CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent

7
  • 1
    I think you're right @aquinas: Raph's answer will fail if list 1 is {1, 3, 5} and list 2 is {1, 3, 3, 3, 5}. Now that I think of it, checking sizes may not be enough because that would fail if list 1 is {1, 1, 3, 5, 5} and list 2 is {1, 3, 3, 5, 5}. Still, +1 to Raph for a very elegant starting point.
    – Ed Gibbs
    Jan 29, 2015 at 15:34
  • Except yields the differences between two lists. If there are an item more in one list, this item will be yielded. So no need to check sizes.
    – rducom
    Jan 29, 2015 at 15:35
  • Hmmm. Yes, if there is an overlap of values, it fails. Moreover, this test does'n' check values order. You have to add check on Count. So I correct my answer
    – rducom
    Jan 29, 2015 at 15:35
  • 3
    You might also use the CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent from mstest...
    – robi-y
    Feb 1, 2015 at 13:01
  • 1
    Just as a warning that I came across playing with this. Except doesn't yield the differences per se. It filters anything out of the first list that appears in the second. So, if you have expected = {1,2,3,4,4} and actual = {1,2,3,4,5}, the assertion will pass incorrectly. So (if you're not going to use CollectionAssert), you should test the Except both ways, i.e. (!expected.Except(actual).Any() && !actual.Except(expected).Any()) Sep 5, 2019 at 18:32
9

Maybe another way is:

Assert.True(expected.SequenceEqual(actual));

This does checks the order too. This is what happens internally:

using (IEnumerator<TSource> e1 = first.GetEnumerator())
using (IEnumerator<TSource> e2 = second.GetEnumerator())
{
    while (e1.MoveNext())
    {
        if (!(e2.MoveNext() && comparer.Equals(e1.Current, e2.Current))) return false;
    }
    if (e2.MoveNext()) return false;
}
return true;

So if you don't care about the order, just order both lists before:

Assert.True(expected.OrderBy(i => i).SequenceEqual(actual.OrderBy(i => i)));
2
  • Thank you Raph - maybe I should have specified in my answer that the actual list does not necessarily contain int values. Actually the values that I use cannot be ordered (i.e. the corresponding classes do not implement IComparable<T>). Thus SequenceEqual is not an option as it checks the order of the items.
    – feO2x
    Jan 29, 2015 at 16:05
  • If you have an identity property on you class, maybe you can use it to order by this property. In the worst case, you can implement a custom IEqualityComparer<T> for your class.
    – rducom
    Jan 29, 2015 at 16:10
2

If the items in your collection are guaranteed to be unique, you could use a HashSet. That's because a HashSet is unordered by nature.

[Fact]
public void Foo()
{
    var expected = new HashSet<int> { 1, 2 ,3 };
    var actual = new HashSet<int> { 3, 2, 1 };

    Assert.Equal(expected, actual);
}

This works because xUnit uses the ISet.SetEquals() method.

This method ignores the order of elements and any duplicate elements in other.

If the actual collection is just a regular collection (not a HashSet) then you can still use SetEquals() yourself but you must realize that duplicates will be ignored.

[Fact]
public void Foo()
{
    var expected = new HashSet<int> { 1, 2 ,3 };
    var actual = new [] { 3, 2, 1, 1, 1 };

    // This also passes, but may not be what you want
    Assert.True(expected.SetEquals(actual));
}
2
  • 1
    Thanks for your solution. The fact that it only works properly for collections with unique items might be a bummer, especially as checking the count is not enough - e.g. when comparing { 1, 1, 2, 3 } with {1, 2, 3, 3 }: both have the same count, but another item is duplicated.
    – feO2x
    Jul 13, 2021 at 7:54
  • Thanks, rolled back the Count suggestion since it's wrong Jul 13, 2021 at 18:07
0

You can use CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent from Microsoft

CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent(expected, actual);
1
  • CollectionAssert is part of MSTest and NUnit, so this answer is not valid for XUnit
    – Ipsit Gaur
    Oct 19, 2021 at 5:31
0

This is almost the same as your code. The only simplification is using Assert.Contains instead of Assert.True(expected.Contains(...)).

[Fact]
public void SomeTest()
{
    // Do something in Arrange and Act phase to obtain a collection
    List<int> actual = ...

    // Now the important stuff in the Assert phase
    var expected = new List<int> { 42, 87, 30 };
    Assert.Equal(expected.Count, actual.Count);
    foreach (var item in expected)
        Assert.Contains(item, actual);
}

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