37

I have a nested dictionary object and I want to be able to retrieve values of keys with an arbitrary depth. I'm able to do this by subclassing dict:

>>> class MyDict(dict):
...     def recursive_get(self, *args, **kwargs):
...         default = kwargs.get('default')
...         cursor = self
...         for a in args:
...             if cursor is default: break
...             cursor = cursor.get(a, default)
...         return cursor
... 
>>> d = MyDict(foo={'bar': 'baz'})
>>> d
{'foo': {'bar': 'baz'}}
>>> d.get('foo')
{'bar': 'baz'}
>>> d.recursive_get('foo')
{'bar': 'baz'}
>>> d.recursive_get('foo', 'bar')
'baz'
>>> d.recursive_get('bogus key', default='nonexistent key')
'nonexistent key'

However, I don't want to have to subclass dict to get this behavior. Is there some built-in method that has equivalent or similar behavior? If not, are there any standard or external modules that provide this behavior?

I'm using Python 2.7 at the moment, though I would be curious to hear about 3.x solutions as well.

4
  • d.get('foo').get('bar') ?
    – Foon
    Jan 29, 2015 at 22:14
  • It sounds like you're reasonably happy with the functionality you've achieved using the code posted in your question. Is there any particular reason you don't want to subclass dict?
    – John Y
    Jan 29, 2015 at 22:18
  • @Foon, that doesn't nest to an arbitrary depth and it will throw an exception (instead of returning the default value) if some key early in the chain doesn't exist.
    – jayhendren
    Jan 29, 2015 at 23:14
  • 1
    @JohnY - Just a couple reasons - I'm hoping there's some method to do this on dict objects without coercing them into MyDict objects, and I'm curious if this is possible without subclassing dict. Otherwise, subclassing works just fine.
    – jayhendren
    Jan 29, 2015 at 23:16

9 Answers 9

52

A very common pattern to do this is to use an empty dict as your default:

d.get('foo', {}).get('bar')

If you have more than a couple of keys, you could use reduce (note that in Python 3 reduce must be imported: from functools import reduce) to apply the operation multiple times

reduce(lambda c, k: c.get(k, {}), ['foo', 'bar'], d)

Of course, you should consider wrapping this into a function (or a method):

def recursive_get(d, *keys):
    return reduce(lambda c, k: c.get(k, {}), keys, d)
3
  • Thanks! I was wondering if there was an Python-idomatic way of doing this; using empty dicts as the default to get() and using anonymous functions both seem like good idioms.
    – jayhendren
    Jan 29, 2015 at 23:18
  • Even though this answers the OP's question, I consider jpp's answer more concise. Raising a KeyError in some situations is more natural than returning an empty dict. Also, jpp's answer is more generic as it can be used for nested dictionaries, nested lists and mixtures of both.
    – normanius
    Dec 5, 2018 at 15:03
  • This covers most cases, but a downside is that the usual test of if d.get(k) is None doesn't work anymore since this implementation doesn't distinguish a key pointing to an empty dict vs. a key which cannot be found Sep 7, 2021 at 16:30
29

@ThomasOrozco's solution is correct, but resorts to a lambda function, which is only necessary to avoid TypeError if an intermediary key does not exist. If this isn't a concern, you can use dict.get directly:

from functools import reduce

def get_from_dict(dataDict, mapList):
    """Iterate nested dictionary"""
    return reduce(dict.get, mapList, dataDict)

Here's a demo:

a = {'Alice': {'Car': {'Color': 'Blue'}}}  
path = ['Alice', 'Car', 'Color']
get_from_dict(a, path)  # 'Blue'

If you wish to be more explicit than using lambda while still avoiding TypeError, you can wrap in a try / except clause:

def get_from_dict(dataDict, mapList):
    """Iterate nested dictionary"""
    try:
        return reduce(dict.get, mapList, dataDict)
    except TypeError:
        return None  # or some other default value

Finally, if you wish to raise KeyError when a key does not exist at any level, use operator.getitem or dict.__getitem__:

from functools import reduce
from operator import getitem

def getitem_from_dict(dataDict, mapList):
    """Iterate nested dictionary"""
    return reduce(getitem, mapList, dataDict)
    # or reduce(dict.__getitem__, mapList, dataDict)

Note that [] is syntactic sugar for the __getitem__ method. So this relates precisely how you would ordinarily access a dictionary value. The operator module just provides a more readable means of accessing this method.

4
  • 1
    Note that this works perfectly also for nested lists. The variant using getitem will raise an IndexError if any of the indices is out of range.
    – normanius
    Dec 5, 2018 at 14:46
  • 1
    Even better, the suggested answer can be used for dicts containing both nested lists and nested dicts, which is useful when working for example with json data.
    – normanius
    Dec 5, 2018 at 14:55
  • 1
    ...I forgot to mention tuples and any object that implements the __getitem__ method...
    – normanius
    Dec 5, 2018 at 15:28
  • This also seem to work for pandas, although the exact allowed syntax for slicing a data frame is not clear to me....
    – Confounded
    Nov 7, 2023 at 23:20
4

You can actually achieve this really neatly in Python 3, given its handling of default keyword arguments and tuple decomposition:

In [1]: def recursive_get(d, *args, default=None):
   ...:     if not args:
   ...:         return d
   ...:     key, *args = args
   ...:     return recursive_get(d.get(key, default), *args, default=default)
   ...: 

Similar code will also work in python 2, but you'd need to revert to using **kwargs, as you did in your example. You'd also need to use indexing to decompose *args.

In any case, there's no need for a loop if you're going to make the function recursive anyway.

You can see that the above code demonstrates the same functionality as your existing method:

In [2]: d = {'foo': {'bar': 'baz'}}

In [3]: recursive_get(d, 'foo')
Out[3]: {'bar': 'baz'}

In [4]: recursive_get(d, 'foo', 'bar')
Out[4]: 'baz'

In [5]: recursive_get(d, 'bogus key', default='nonexistent key')
Out[5]: 'nonexistent key'
1

You can use a defaultdict to give you an empty dict on missing keys:

from collections import defaultdict
mydict = defaultdict(dict)

This only goes one level deep - mydict[missingkey] is an empty dict, mydict[missingkey][missing key] is a KeyError. You can add as many levels as needed by wrapping it in more defaultdicts, eg defaultdict(defaultdict(dict)). You could also have the innermost one as another defaultdict with a sensible factory function for your use case, eg

mydict = defaultdict(defaultdict(lambda: 'big summer blowout'))

If you need it to go to arbitrary depth, you can do that like so:

def insanity():
    return defaultdict(insanity)

print(insanity()[0][0][0][0])
1
  • How would you use this concept in a recursive_get() function? Jun 15, 2022 at 19:21
0

There is none that I am aware of. However, you don't need to subclass dict at all, you can just write a function that takes a dictionary, args and kwargs and does the same thing:

 def recursive_get(d, *args, **kwargs):
     default = kwargs.get('default')
     cursor = d
     for a in args:
         if cursor is default: break
         cursor = recursive_get(cursor, a, default)
     return cursor 

use it like this

recursive_get(d, 'foo', 'bar')
1
  • Your example raises RecursionError Jun 15, 2022 at 19:00
0

The OP requested the following behavior

>>> d.recursive_get('bogus key', default='nonexistent key')
'nonexistent key'

(As of June 15, 22022) none of the up-voted answers accomplish this, so I have modified @ThomasOrozco's solution to resolve this

from functools import reduce

def rget(d, *keys, default=None):
    """Use a sentinel to handle both missing keys AND alternate default values"""
    sentinel = {}
    v = reduce(lambda c, k: c.get(k, sentinel), keys, d)
    if v is sentinel:
        return default
    return v

Below is a complete, unit-test-like demonstration of where the other answers have issues. I've named each approach according to its author. Note that this answer is the only one which passes all 4 test cases, namely

  1. Basic retrieval when key-tree exists
  2. Non-existent key-tree returns None
  3. Option to specify a default aside from None
  4. Values which are an empty dict should return as themselves rather than the default
from functools import reduce


def thomas_orozco(d, *keys):
    return reduce(lambda c, k: c.get(k, {}), keys, d)


def jpp(dataDict, *mapList):
    """Same logic as thomas_orozco but exits at the first missing key instead of last"""
    try:
        return reduce(dict.get, *mapList, dataDict)
    except TypeError:
        return None


def sapi(d, *args, default=None):
    if not args:
        return d
    key, *args = args
    return sapi(d.get(key, default), *args, default=default)


def rget(d, *keys, default=None):
    sentinel = {}
    v = reduce(lambda c, k: c.get(k, sentinel), keys, d)
    if v is sentinel:
        return default
    return v


def assert_rget_behavior(func):
    """Unit tests for desired behavior of recursive dict.get()"""
    fail_count = 0

    # Basic retrieval when key-tree exists
    d = {'foo': {'bar': 'baz', 'empty': {}}}
    try:
        v = func(d, 'foo', 'bar')
        assert v == 'baz', f'Unexpected value {v} retrieved'
    except Exception as e:
        print(f'Case 1: Failed basic retrieval with {repr(e)}')
        fail_count += 1

    # Non-existent key-tree returns None
    try:
        v = func(d, 'bogus', 'key')
        assert v is None, f'Missing key retrieved as {v} instead of None'
    except Exception as e:
        print(f'Case 2: Failed missing retrieval with {repr(e)}')
        fail_count += 1

    # Option to specify a default aside from None
    default = 'alternate'
    try:
        v = func(d, 'bogus', 'key', default=default)
        assert v == default, f'Missing key retrieved as {v} instead of {default}'
    except Exception as e:
        print(f'Case 3: Failed default retrieval with {repr(e)}')
        fail_count += 1

    # Values which are an empty dict should return as themselves rather than the default
    try:
        v = func(d, 'foo', 'empty')
        assert v == {}, f'Empty dict value retrieved as {v} instead of {{}}'
    except Exception as e:
        print(f'Case 4: Failed retrieval of empty dict value with {repr(e)}')
        fail_count += 1

    # Success only if all pass
    if fail_count == 0:
        print('Passed all tests!')


if __name__ == '__main__':

    assert_rget_behavior(thomas_orozco)  # Fails cases 2 and 3
    assert_rget_behavior(jpp)  # Fails cases 1, 3, and 4
    assert_rget_behavior(sapi)  # Fails cases 2 and 3

    assert_rget_behavior(rget)  # Only one to pass all 3
1
  • I mean, strictly speaking, the actual request in my question was whether there is a module which does roughly what I asked for: "Is there some built-in method that has equivalent or similar behavior? If not, are there any standard or external modules that provide this behavior?" So the fact that none of the code in the other answers exactly matches the example usage in the question is not a problem as far as I'm concerned.
    – jayhendren
    Jun 17, 2022 at 1:17
0

softy provides a readable interface for this.

import softy
d = softy.soften({'foo': {'bar': 'baz'}})

if d.foo.bar is not softy.null:
    print(f'd.foo.bar is {d.foo.bar}')
else:
    print('Nope, not there')

as_dict = softy.harden(d)

https://pypi.org/project/softy/

Disclaimer: I am the author of softy

-1

collections.default_dict will handle the providing of default values for nonexistent keys at least.

3
  • 1
    I couldn't figure out a way to make it recursive. Jan 29, 2015 at 22:36
  • 2
    So will dict.get(). That's not the behavior I'm concerned with here.
    – jayhendren
    Jan 29, 2015 at 23:13
  • @jayhendren see my answer. I've debugged those functions and they're now used in production. Answer is here: stackoverflow.com/a/65842260/7076615 Feb 6, 2021 at 0:52
-1

The Iterative Solution

def deep_get(d:dict, keys, default=None, create=True):
    if not keys:
        return default
    
    for key in keys[:-1]:
        if key in d:
            d = d[key]
        elif create:
            d[key] = {}
            d = d[key]
        else:
            return default
    
    key = keys[-1]
    
    if key in d:
        return d[key]
    elif create:
        d[key] = default
    
    return default


def deep_set(d:dict, keys, value, create=True):
    assert(keys)
    
    for key in keys[:-1]:
        if key in d:
            d = d[key]
        elif create:
            d[key] = {}
            d = d[key]
    
    d[keys[-1]] = value 
    return value

I am about to test it inside of a Django project with a line such as:

keys = ('options', 'style', 'body', 'name')

val = deep_set(d, keys, deep_get(s, keys, 'dotted'))

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