For a JPA entity model using a case-insensitive database schema, when I use a @IdClass annotation I consistently get 'identifier of an instance was altered' exception. For an object with a 'string' primary key, the error occurs when an string of one case exists in the database and a query is performed with the same string differing only in case.

I've looked at other SO answers and they are of the form: a) don't modify the primary key (I'm not) and b) your equals()/hashCode() implementations are flawed. For 'b' I've tried using toLowerCase() and equalsIgnoringCase() but to no avail. [Additionally, it seems the Hibernate code is directly setting properties, rather than calling property setters when the 'altering' occurs.]

Here is the specific error:

Caused by: javax.persistence.PersistenceException: org.hibernate.HibernateException: 
identifier of an instance of db.Company was altered 
 from {Company.Identity [62109154] ACURA}
   to {Company.Identity [63094242] Acura}

Q: For a case insensitive DB containing a company 'Acura' (as primary key), using @IdClass how do I subsequently find other capitalizations?

Here is the offending code (starting with an empty database):

public class Main {    
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EntityManagerFactory emf =
                Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("mobile.mysql");
        EntityManager em = emf.createEntityManager();

        em.getTransaction().begin();

        Company c1 = new Company ("Acura");
        em.persist(c1);

        em.getTransaction().commit();
        em.getTransaction().begin();

        c1 = em.find (Company.class, new Company.Identity("ACURA"));

        em.getTransaction().commit();
        em.close();
        System.exit (0);    
    }
}

and here is the 'db.Company' implementation:

@Entity
@IdClass(Company.Identity.class)
public class Company implements Serializable {

    @Id
    protected String name;

    public Company(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public Company() { }

    @Override
    public int hashCode () {
        return name.hashCode();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals (Object that) {
        return this == that ||
                (that instanceof Company &&
                        this.name.equals(((Company) that).name));}

    @Override
    public String toString () {
        return "{Company@" + hashCode() + " " + name + "}";
    }

    //

    public static class Identity implements Serializable {
        protected String name;

        public Identity(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }

        public Identity() { }

        @Override
        public int hashCode () {
            return name.hashCode();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals (Object that) {
            return this == that ||
                    (that instanceof Identity &&
                        this.name.equals(((Identity)that).name));
        }

        @Override
        public String toString () {
            return "{Company.Identity [" + hashCode() + "] " + name + "}";
        }
    }
}

Note: I know using @IdClass isn't needed when there is a single primary key; the above is the simplest example of the problem.

As I said, I believe this problem persists even when the hashCode()/equals() methods are made case insensitive; however, suggestions taken.

...
INFO: HHH000232: Schema update complete
Hibernate: insert into Company (name) values (?)
Hibernate: select company0_.name as name1_0_0_ from Company company0_ where company0_.name=?
Exception in thread "main" javax.persistence.RollbackException: Error while committing the transaction
    at org.hibernate.jpa.internal.TransactionImpl.commit(TransactionImpl.java:94)
    at com.lambdaspace.Main.main(Main.java:24)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.application.AppMain.main(AppMain.java:134)
Caused by: javax.persistence.PersistenceException: org.hibernate.HibernateException: identifier of an instance of db.Company was altered from {Company.Identity [62109154] ACURA} to {Company.Identity [63094242] Acura}
    at org.hibernate.jpa.spi.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.convert(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:1763)
    at org.hibernate.jpa.spi.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.convert(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:1677)
    at org.hibernate.jpa.internal.TransactionImpl.commit(TransactionImpl.java:82)
    ... 6 more
Caused by: org.hibernate.HibernateException: identifier of an instance of db.Company was altered from {Company.Identity [62109154] ACURA} to {Company.Identity [63094242] Acura}
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.checkId(DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.java:80)
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.getValues(DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.java:192)
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.onFlushEntity(DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.java:152)
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.AbstractFlushingEventListener.flushEntities(AbstractFlushingEventListener.java:231)
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.AbstractFlushingEventListener.flushEverythingToExecutions(AbstractFlushingEventListener.java:102)
    at org.hibernate.event.internal.DefaultFlushEventListener.onFlush(DefaultFlushEventListener.java:55)
    at org.hibernate.internal.SessionImpl.flush(SessionImpl.java:1222)
    at org.hibernate.internal.SessionImpl.managedFlush(SessionImpl.java:425)
    at org.hibernate.engine.transaction.internal.jdbc.JdbcTransaction.beforeTransactionCommit(JdbcTransaction.java:101)
    at org.hibernate.engine.transaction.spi.AbstractTransactionImpl.commit(AbstractTransactionImpl.java:177)
    at org.hibernate.jpa.internal.TransactionImpl.commit(TransactionImpl.java:77)
    ... 6 more
  • So the find() is not being reached, and the exception is thrown from the insert in the first txn? That's all that can be concluded from your stacktrace – Neil Stockton Jan 30 '15 at 9:03
  • @NeilStockton No, I believe it is the find() first because add that line causes the problem and second because the log output shows shows a select after an insert. From the backtrace it seems as if the error happens on the second commit. – GoZoner Jan 30 '15 at 13:40
  • If the "find" works then you can easily enough PRINT OUT what is the Id of that object – Neil Stockton Jan 31 '15 at 7:45
up vote 8 down vote accepted
+100

The reason for this error is due to changing the entity identifier of a managed entity.

During the life-time of a PersistenceContext, there can be one and only one managed instance of any given entity. For this, you can't change an existing managed entity identifier.

In you example, even if you start a new transaction, you must remember that the PersistenContext has not been closed, so you still have a managed c1 entity attached to the Hibernate Session.

When you try to find the Company:

c1 = em.find (Company.class, new Company.Identity("ACURA"));

The identifier doesn't match the one for the Company that's being attached to the current Session, so a query is issued:

Hibernate: select company0_.name as name1_0_0_ from Company company0_ where company0_.name=?

Because SQL is CASE INSENSITIVE, you will practically select the same database row as the current managed Company entity (the persisted c1).

But you can have only one managed entity for the same database row, so Hibernate will reuse the managed entity instance, but it will update the identifier to:

new Company.Identity("ACURA");

You can check this assumptions with the following test:

String oldId = c1.name;
Company c2 = em.find (Company.class, new Company.Identity("ACURA"));
assertSame(c1, c2);
assertFalse(oldId.equals(c2.name));

When the second transaction is committed, the flush will try to update the entity identifier (which changed from 'Acura' to 'ACURA') and so the DefaultFlushEntityEventListener.checkId() method will fail.

According to teh JavaDoc, this check is for:

make(ing) sure (the) user didn't mangle the id

To fix it, you need to remove this find method call:

c1 = em.find (Company.class, new Company.Identity("ACURA"));

You can check that c1 is already attached:

assertTrue(em.contains(c1));
  • Is there a way to write the Company.Identifier() class to avoid this? In practice, I can't 'remote the find method call' - because when inserting millions of Companies I can't know if the object exists in the database unless I find it! And the act of finding it, apparently, munges the Hibernate Session? This is a VERY strange property of Hibernate find() behavior, is it not? – GoZoner Feb 5 '15 at 4:57
  • Yes you can. You need to switch to an EmbeddedId and then it will work. – Vlad Mihalcea Feb 5 '15 at 5:42
  • So @IdClass is worth nothing whatsoever when a String is used as any one of the @Ids? (By using @EmbeddedId you are having the DB deal with string case insensitivity, not Hibernate). Can't hibernate know that a Schema/Table/Column is case insensitive and then adjust the ID comparisons appropriately? – GoZoner Feb 5 '15 at 5:51
  • You can decide using lower (or uppercase). When you pass the String to the EmbeddedId or IdClass you lowercase it. Then both DB and Java use the same data representation. – Vlad Mihalcea Feb 5 '15 at 6:15
  • 1
    You can correlate an @Id and a ManyToOne association through a MapsId annotation. – Vlad Mihalcea Feb 8 '15 at 13:07

you seem to be manually assigning ids to your persistent object which is being managed by the JPA itself and you are trying to alter the id which is already there with this entity, which is not allowed.

    Company c1 = new Company ("Acura");
    em.persist(c1);

    em.getTransaction().commit();
    em.getTransaction().begin();

    c1 = em.find (Company.class, new Company.Identity("ACURA"));

In above piece of code did you try changing "ACURA" to "Acura" that seems to be the root cause. and you are using the same instance c1 to represents both the object having different ids i.e. 1 with "ACURA" and 2nd with "Acura".

  • The first new Company ("Acura") is making a new entity that is then persisted. The second new Company.Identifier("ACURA") is making an instance of the @IdClass, used by find() to identify company. – GoZoner Jan 30 '15 at 13:42

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.