162

Shall this be the example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    cout << "Hola, moondo.\n";
}

It throws the error:

gcc -c main.cpp gcc -o edit main.o  main.o: In function `main':
main.cpp:(.text+0xa): undefined reference to `std::cout'
main.cpp:(.text+0xf): undefined reference to `std::basic_ostream<char,std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator<< <std::char_traits<char>>(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*)'
main.o: In function `__static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int,int)':
main.cpp:(.text+0x3d): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::Init()'
main.cpp:(.text+0x4c): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::~Init()' collect2: error: ld
returned 1 exit status make: *** [qs] Error 1

Also, this example:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    std::cout<<"Hola, moondo.\n";
}

throws the error:

gcc -c main.cpp gcc -o edit main.o  main.o: In function `main':
main.cpp:(.text+0xa): undefined reference to `std::cout'
main.cpp:(.text+0xf): undefined reference to `std::basic_ostream<char,std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator<<<std::char_traits<char>>(std::basic_ostream<char,std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*)'
main.o: In function `__static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int,int)': main.cpp:(.text+0x3d): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::Init()'
main.cpp:(.text+0x4c): undefined reference to `std::ios_base::Init::~Init()' collect2: error: ld
returned 1 exit status make: *** [qs] Error 1

Note: I am using Debian Wheezy.

  • 133
    Try g++ instead of gcc. gcc is for C and will not give you access to the C++ standard library. – juanchopanza Jan 30 '15 at 13:21
  • 2
    Well, that definitely solved the problem. As I understand, GCC is the acronym for Gnu Compiler Collection. Shouldn't it call the g++ compiler when needed? So the command gcc calls the c compiler instead... – D1X Jan 31 '15 at 14:42
  • 1
    @D1X it's because you invoked the linker separately from the compiler. when you write gcc -o edit main.o it doesn't know that main.o is going to need C++ startup libraries. – M.M Feb 26 '15 at 4:22
  • 4
  • 4
    Q: Shouldn't it call the g++ compiler when needed? A: No more than gcc should call gfortran, gjc, ... etc. etc. as needed. – paulsm4 Jul 16 '15 at 3:29
228

Compile the program with:

g++ -Wall -Wextra -Werror -c main.cpp -o main.o
     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ <- For listing all warnings when your code is compiled.

as cout is present in the C++ standard library, which would need explicit linking with -lstdc++ when using gcc; g++ links the standard library by default.

With gcc, (g++ should be preferred over gcc)

gcc main.cpp -lstdc++ -o main.o
  • 10
    It can be used to compile C++ code, the thing is that it doesn't link with the C++ library. gcc will work just fine if you just add -lstdc++. – Some programmer dude Jan 30 '15 at 13:24
  • 3
    Please always include -Wall when giving gcc/g++ command line examples - it helps to get noobs into good habits at an early stage and saves everyone time time further down the road. ;-) – Paul R Jan 30 '15 at 13:29
  • 4
    Since when is iostreams and std::cout part of the Standard Template Library? – T.C. Jan 30 '15 at 13:45
  • 1
    Why is -Werror needed? I have revised the documentation and if I understand well will make the warnings errors and will make my projects less easy to compile. – D1X Jan 31 '15 at 15:02
  • 6
    @D1X: Because there's a nasty habit among programmers to ignore warnings. Virtually everything that -Wall and even -Wextra warn about is either a very real problem, or sloppy coding that can very easily be fixed. The message here is to get into a habit where you consider compiler warnings a helpful pointer to where your code could be improved, instead of a nuisance. There are hundreds of questions here on SO that wouldn't have been necessary in the first place if the OP had used -Wall -Wextra. -Werror is simply reinforcing that. – DevSolar Feb 2 '15 at 11:54
36

Yes, using g++ command worked for me:

g++ my_source_code.cpp
  • then run with ./a.out – kaleidawave Aug 16 at 20:45
0

Makefiles

If you're working with a makefile and you ended up here like me, then this is probably what you're looking or:

If you're using a makefile, then you need to change cc as shown below

my_executable : main.o
    cc -o my_executable main.o

to

CC = g++

my_executable : main.o
    $(CC) -o my_executable main.o

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