Listing 3.7. Implicitly Allowing the this Reference to Escape. Don't Do this.

public class ThisEscape {
 public ThisEscape(EventSource source) {
  source.registerListener(
   new EventListener() {
     public void onEvent(Event e) {
      doSomething(e);
     }
   }
  }
 }
}

Quoting "A final mechanism by which an object or its internal state can be published is to publish an inner class instance, as shown in ThisEscape in Listing 3.7. When ThisEscape publishes the EventListener, it implicitly publishes the enclosing ThisEscape instance as well, because inner class instances contain a hidden reference to the enclosing instance. "

My question is: Where is this hidden reference and how can this be exploited?

The "hidden reference" is the implicit variable that any non-static inner class has that allows it to reference members of its outer class.

Consider a slightly-modified version of that class:

public class ThisEscape {
  private final List<EventSource> listOfEvents;
  public ThisEscape(EventSource source) {
    source.registerListener(
      new EventListener() {
        public void onEvent(Event e) {
          doSomething(e);
          listOfEvents.add(e);  //The "hidden reference" is what allows this inner class 
                                //to use the parent's "listOfEvents" member variable
        }
      }
    }
    Thread.sleep(5000); //This would need a try/catch - skipping that
    listOfEvents = new ArrayList<EventSource>();
  }
}

In this case, it's obvious what the problem is - if any event is passed to the EventListener before the Thread.sleep finishes, listOfEvents will still be null, and you'll get a NullPointerException.

Due to the way Java handles memory visibility across threads, you could still have a similar effect (though it would be much less likely) even if you removed the call to sleep, and even if you moved the initialization of listOfEvents before the call to registerListener!

As far as "exploiting" this, that would depend greatly on the context - but any instance of the above pattern is certainly a potential bug that could happen, even without an attacker trying to take advantage of it.

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