5

Having a difficult time putting what I am trying to do into words so searching is also difficult.

Basically I am trying to look whether a certain value exists in a column, partitioned by group, and then propagate that value forward.

In this example I want to check whether a user has completed the tutorial and set a flag that carries forward.

pk | user | ... | activity
 1 |    A | ... |  "login"
 2 |    A | ... |  "started_tutorial"
 3 |    A | ... |  "completed_tutorial"
 4 |    A | ... |  "some other activity"
 5 |    A | ... |  "logout"
 5 |    B | ... |  "login"
 6 |    B | ... |  "logout"

I think this should be something like

select *,
    check(activity in ('completed_tutorial')) as completed_activity
    from tbl

but I don't think I can use check in a select statement and this would be a constant flag rather than set to true only after it has been found.

Example of what I am trying to get:

pk | user | ... | activity               | completed_tutorial
 1 |    A | ... |  "login"               |                 0
 2 |    A | ... |  "started_tutorial"    |                 0
 3 |    A | ... |  "completed_tutorial"  |                 1
 4 |    A | ... |  "some other activity" |                 1
 5 |    A | ... |  "logout"              |                 1
 5 |    B | ... |  "login"               |                 0
 6 |    B | ... |  "logout"              |                 0
3

You can filter SQL groups with the HAVING clause. For example, you can group your table by users and their activity, and then filter it to contain only those that have completed the tutorial:

SELECT user FROM tbl
GROUP BY user, activity
HAVING activity = 'completed_tutorial';

EDIT: After OP has edited their question, this is my new answer. Here, I assume that your table has a date field.

SELECT *, COALESCE(date >= (
    SELECT date FROM tbl WHERE activity = 'completed_tutorial'
    AND user = outertbl.user
), FALSE)
FROM tbl AS outertbl
ORDER BY date

Notice, that such query is essentially N² when unoptimised, so I would recommend instead to just get the data from the database and then process it in your program.

  • This is helpful but I don't want to filter/remove rows. Instead I want to have an indicator for each row to denote whether the activity has occurred or not. – Ellis Valentiner Jan 30 '15 at 16:53
  • @user12202013 See edit. – Ainar-G Jan 30 '15 at 17:24
1

you could try something like this

SELECT a.*, coalesce(b.completed, 0)
FROM tbl a 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT user, 1 completed 
           FROM tbl 
           WHERE user = a.user 
                 AND activity='completed_tutorial') b 
ON a.user = b.user AND b.pk >= a.pk

it assumes there is at most one row with activity='completed_tutorial' and that user identifies the "session". you'll have to add another field if a user can make more than one tutorial.

  • This looks really good. I'll keep playing with it to double check that it is exactly what I'm trying to do. Thanks. – Ellis Valentiner Jan 30 '15 at 17:23
  • So this seems to create an indicator for whether activity is "completed_tutorial" but does not propagate the indicator forward. :( – Ellis Valentiner Jan 30 '15 at 17:38
  • what do you mean by "propagate forward"? it will join all the records with its corresponding "completed_tutorial" if it exists. – 1010 Jan 30 '15 at 17:42
  • if you look at rows 4 and 5 in my example you will see that the completed_tutorial indicator is positive because row 3 activity = "completed_activity" – Ellis Valentiner Jan 30 '15 at 17:46
  • ok, added a condition assuming pk is an autonumeric which gives the time sequence, so the rows after completed are completed. – 1010 Jan 30 '15 at 17:52
1

I am not sure about the speed of this, but what about the following solution?

SELECT
    user
    ,max(CASE
            WHEN activity = "completed_tutorial" THEN 1
            ELSE 0
            END) AS completed_tutorial
  FROM tbl
  GROUP BY user
 ;

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.