1

Looking for a little wisdom from fellow Rubyists. For a while now, I've used the following for convenience in some of my applications, and I'm wondering if there's a language feature I'm just missing:

class Object
  def as_block
    yield
  end
end

There are other uses, but the normal case for me is a conditional assignment that requires a little non-trivial logic. Two obvious ways to do this:

# via a second method:
def foo
  @foo ||= set_foo
end

# via conditional logic:
def foo
  if @foo
    @foo
  else
    # do complicated stuff
  end
end

Both of these approaches seem kind of ugly: in the first case, #set_foo seems extraneous, and the second just looks kind of nasty. So, instead, I like this:

def foo
  @foo ||= as_block do
    # do complicated stuff
  end
end

The problem here (aside from monkey patching Object) is that it's really a dependency (on the monkey patch) that looks like a language feature. That is, something like this really shouldn't be in (say) a Rails initializer---it seems like it should be in a gem, so the dependency can be managed correctly. Then I'm packaging an entire gem to run five lines of code to monkey patch Object...

So, my questions: 1. Anyone else use this, or something like it? 2. Has the Ruby team ever considered including something like this by default? It seems like a really easy way to use blocks as plain old expressions, but it's not there (as far as I know) which makes me wonder if there's some reason for not including it, or... 3. Is there already some better way of doing this that I'm just unaware of?

Thanks!

-E

2

You could use a lambda:

def foo
  @foo ||= lambda do
    # do complicated stuff
  end.call
end

Note that it is important to call the lambda to actually execute the expression, ie

def foo
  @foo ||= lambda do
    # do complicated stuff
  end
end

will return a lambda rather than your evaluated expression.

  • Durrr...Good answer. Thanks. – Erik Jan 30 '15 at 19:22
5

What you're looking for is begin ... end. This isn't the same thing as a block or Proc, as it's not an object you can pass around or a closure which creates a new scope, but it should serve your purpose just fine:

def foo
  @foo ||= begin
    # do complicated stuff
  end
end
  • Yeah, I'm aware of the begin/end approach---actually, the first few times I ran into this, that's what I used. My complaint is that it's... well, it's broken from both semantic and style perspectives. First, when I'm reading code, begin/end constructs that aren't trapping exceptions don't look right. More importantly, begin/end blocks have weird properties; see, e.g., blog.newrelic.com/2014/11/13/weird-ruby-begin-end – Erik Jan 31 '15 at 20:15
  • 1
    @Erik I'm not sure why you think begin ... end doesn't look right while as_block do ... end does. IMO, this is one of the main reasons for using a begin ... end block, the other being exception handling. The special casing for creating a do while construct is indeed unfortunate, but it's really only a problem in that one case, and as long as you don't use it intentionally you're not going to run into that problem anyway. (E.g. Why would you write begin ... end while <condition> when you really meant just meant while <condition>; ... end in the first place?) – Ajedi32 Jan 31 '15 at 21:42
  • 1
    @Ajedi32, I did some looking around at this and it's true, it's not as problematic as I thought earlier. I'm not sure why, but like I said, my brain reads that looking for an ensure statement. Interesting discussion of it here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13279217/… – Erik Feb 1 '15 at 2:44
  • @Erik Well, one person in the comments of the answer you linked suggested parenthesis as an alternative if you don't like begin ... end. Personally though, I prefer to avoid parenthesis for multi line expressions like this. – Ajedi32 Feb 1 '15 at 5:19
  • @Ajed32---Yeah, I'm not wild about parens there either. I'm going to do a little more research into the begin/end style---I may owe you an apology! I'll post back here. – Erik Feb 2 '15 at 17:47

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