80

I feel like this might be a common issue and was wondering if there was any common solution to it.

Basically, my UITableView has dynamic cell heights for every cell. If I am not at the top of the UITableView and I tableView.reloadData(), scrolling up becomes jumpy.

I believe this is due to the fact that because I reloaded data, as I'm scrolling up, the UITableView is recalculating the height for each cell coming into visibility. How do I mitigate that, or how do I only reloadData from a certain IndexPath to the end of the UITableView?

Further, when I do manage to scroll all the way to the top, I can scroll back down and then up, no problem with no jumping. This is most likely because the UITableViewCell heights were already calculated.

  • A couple things... (1) Yes you can definitely reload certain rows using reloadRowsAtIndexPaths. But (2) what do you mean by "jumpy" and (3) have you set an estimated row height? (Just trying to figure out if there's a better solution that would allow you to update the table dynamically.) – Lyndsey Scott Jan 30 '15 at 21:17
  • @LyndseyScott, yes, I have set an estimated row height. By jumpy I mean that as I scroll up, the rows are shifting upwards. I believe this is because I set an estimated row height of 128, and then as I scroll up, all my posts above in the UITableView are smaller, so it shrinks the height, causing my table to jump. I'm thinking of doing reloadRowsAtIndexPaths from row x to the last row in my TableView... but because I'm inserting new rows, it won't work, I can't know what the end of my tableview will be before I reloaded the data. – David Jan 30 '15 at 21:26
  • how do I only reloadData from a certain IndexPath to the end of the UITableView? -- You do that by reading the documentation. – Hot Licks Jan 30 '15 at 21:59
  • 2
    @LyndseyScott still i can't solve problem, is there any good solution? – rad Mar 10 '15 at 23:06
  • 1
    Did you ever find a solution for this problem? I am experiencing the exact same problem as seen in your video. – user3344977 Apr 23 '15 at 5:54

13 Answers 13

136

To prevent jumping you should save heights of cells when they loads and give exact value in tableView:estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath:

// declare cellHeightsDictionary
NSMutableDictionary *cellHeightsDictionary;

// initialize in code (thanks to @Gerharbo)
cellHeightsDictionary = @{}.mutableCopy;

// declare table dynamic row height and create correct constraints in cells
tableView.rowHeight = UITableViewAutomaticDimension;

// save height
- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView willDisplayCell:(UITableViewCell *)cell forRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    [cellHeightsDictionary setObject:@(cell.frame.size.height) forKey:indexPath];
}

// give exact height value
- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    NSNumber *height = [cellHeightsDictionary objectForKey:indexPath];
    if (height) return height.doubleValue;
    return UITableViewAutomaticDimension;
}
  • 1
    Thanks, u really save my day :) Works in objc too – Artem Z. Aug 15 '16 at 12:02
  • 3
    Don't forget to initialize cellHeightsDictionary: cellHeightsDictionary = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary]; – Gerharbo Nov 5 '16 at 20:08
  • 1
    estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath: returns a double value may cause a *** Assertion failure in -[UISectionRowData refreshWithSection:tableView:tableViewRowData:] error. To fix it, return floorf(height.floatValue); instead. – liushuaikobe May 26 '17 at 6:05
  • Hi @lgor, I'm having the same issue & trying to implement your solution. The issue i'm getting is estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath gets called prior to willDisplayCell, so cell's height is not calculated when estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath is called. Any Help? – Madhuri Jul 25 '17 at 9:15
  • @Madhuri effective heights should be calculated in "heightForRowAtIndexPath", that is called for every cell on the screen just before willDisplayCell, which will set the height in the dictionary for later use in estimatedRowHeight (on table reload). – Donnit Jul 26 '17 at 15:16
69

Swift 3 version of accepted answer.

var cellHeights: [IndexPath : CGFloat] = [:]


func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, willDisplay cell: UITableViewCell, forRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) {
    cellHeights[indexPath] = cell.frame.size.height
}

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {
    return cellHeights[indexPath] ?? 70.0 
}
  • Thanks this worked great! in fact I was able to remove my implementation of func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, heightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {, this handles all the height calculation I need. – Natalia Mar 30 '17 at 17:33
  • After struggling many hours with persistant jumping I figured out that I forgot adding UITableViewDelegate to my class. Conforming to that protocol is neccessary because it contains the above shown willDisplay function. I hope I can save someone the same struggle. – MJQZ1347 Sep 25 '17 at 16:25
  • Great answer man!!! Thanks! This helped me a lot after hours of struggling – stan Mar 13 '18 at 13:07
  • Thank you for the Swift answer. In my case I was having some SUPER weird behavior of cells going out of order on reload when the table view was scrolled to/near the bottom. I'll be using this from now on whenever I have self-sizing cells. – Trev14 Jan 31 at 22:51
  • Thank you very much. – Samrat Pramanik Feb 15 at 14:28
24

The jump is because of a bad estimated height. The more the estimatedRowHeight differs from the actual height the more the table may jump when it is reloaded especially the further down it has been scrolled. This is because the table's estimated size radically differs from its actual size, forcing the table to adjust its content size and offset. So the estimated height shouldn't be a random value but close to what you think the height is going to be. I have also experienced when i set UITableViewAutomaticDimension if your cells are same type then

func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        tableView.estimatedRowHeight = 100//close to your cell height
    }

if you have variety of cells in different sections then I think the better place is

    func tableView(tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> CGFloat {
            //return different sizes for different cells if you need to
            return 100
        }
  • 1
    thx. this helped a lot. – tuvok Aug 15 '16 at 14:09
  • 1
    thank you, it's exactly why my tableView was so jumpy. – Louis de Decker Jun 19 '18 at 12:36
  • You saved me man Great!... :) Thanks – veeresh kumbar Jul 13 '18 at 9:47
  • An old answer, but it is still actual as of 2018. Unlike all other answers, this one suggests setting estimatedRowHeigh once in viewDidLoad, which helps when cells are of same or very similar height. Thanx. BTW, alternatively esimatedRowHeight can be set via Interface Builder in Size Inspector > Table View > Estimate. – Vitalii Nov 20 '18 at 12:34
21

@Igor answer is working fine in this case, Swift-4 code of it.

// declaration & initialization  
var cellHeightsDictionary: [IndexPath: CGFloat] = [:]  

in following methods of UITableViewDelegate

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, willDisplay cell: UITableViewCell, forRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) {
  // print("Cell height: \(cell.frame.size.height)")
  self.cellHeightsDictionary[indexPath] = cell.frame.size.height
}

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {
  if let height =  self.cellHeightsDictionary[indexPath] {
    return height
  }
  return UITableViewAutomaticDimension
}
  • 4
    How to deal with row insertion/deletion using this solution? TableView jumps, as the dictionary data isn't actual. – Alexey Chekanov May 7 '18 at 19:19
  • 1
    works great! especially on the last cell when reload row. – Ning Jan 8 at 19:53
8

I ran into this today and observed:

  1. It's iOS 8 only, indeed.
  2. Overridding cellForRowAtIndexPath doesn't help.

The fix was actually pretty simple:

Override estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath and make sure it returns the correct values.

With this, all weird jittering and jumping around in my UITableViews has stopped.

NOTE: I actually know the size of my cells. There are only two possible values. If your cells are truly variable-sized, then you might want to cache the cell.bounds.size.height from tableView:willDisplayCell:forRowAtIndexPath:

  • 1
    Fixed it wen overriding the estimatedHeightForRowAtIndexPath method with an high value, for example 300f – Flappy May 11 '16 at 8:50
  • You saved my life !! – Nitish Dec 14 '16 at 11:10
  • 1
    @Flappy dude! you are my hero! – Haris Hussain Dec 23 '17 at 0:58
6

You can in fact reload only certain rows by using reloadRowsAtIndexPaths, ex:

tableView.reloadRowsAtIndexPaths(indexPathArray, withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimation.None)

But, in general, you could also animate table cell height changes like so:

tableView.beginUpdates()
tableView.endUpdates()
  • I've tried the beginUpdates/endUpdates method, but that only affects the visible rows of my table. I still have the issue when I scroll up. – David Jan 30 '15 at 21:27
  • @David Probably because you're using estimated row heights. – Lyndsey Scott Jan 30 '15 at 21:28
  • Should I get rid of my EstimatedRowHeights, and instead replace it with the beginUpdates and endUpdates? – David Jan 30 '15 at 21:29
  • @David You wouldn't be "replacing" anything, but it really depends on the desired behavior... If you want to use estimated rows height and just reload the indexes below the current visible portion of the table, you can do that like I said using reloadRowsAtIndexPaths – Lyndsey Scott Jan 30 '15 at 21:30
  • One of my issues with trying the reladRowsAtIndexPaths method is that I'm implementing infinite scrolling, so when I'm reloadingData it is becauseI just added 15 more rows to the dataSource. This means that the indexPaths for those rows don't yet exist in the UITableView – David Jan 30 '15 at 21:39
5

I have tried all the workarounds above, but nothing worked.

After spending hours and going through all the possible frustrations, figured out a way to fix this. This solution is a life savior! Worked like a charm!

Swift 4

let lastContentOffset = tableView.contentOffset
tableView.beginUpdates()
tableView.endUpdates()
tableView.layer.removeAllAnimations()
tableView.setContentOffset(lastContentOffset, animated: false)

I added it as an extension, to make the code look cleaner and avoid writing all these lines every time I want to reload.

extension UITableView {

    func reloadWithoutAnimation() {
        let lastScrollOffset = contentOffset
        beginUpdates()
        endUpdates()
        layer.removeAllAnimations()
        setContentOffset(lastScrollOffset, animated: false)
    }
}

finally ..

tableView.reloadWithoutAnimation()
  • Awesome, man! You save my time! – Anessence Aug 30 '18 at 17:22
  • How does this do any reloading? You call it reloadWithoutAnimation but where's the reload part? – matt Oct 13 '18 at 16:01
  • Didn't expect this to work but it actually works wonderfully. – Sulthan Nov 12 '18 at 12:55
  • @matt you could call tableView.reloadData() first and then tableView.reloadWithoutAnimation(), it still works. – Srujan Simha Nov 12 '18 at 17:35
  • I’ll try that then, thanks! – matt Nov 12 '18 at 20:17
1

Here's a bit shorter version:

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {
    return self.cellHeightsDictionary[indexPath] ?? UITableViewAutomaticDimension
}
1

This one worked for me in Swift4:

extension UITableView {

    func reloadWithoutAnimation() {
        let lastScrollOffset = contentOffset
        reloadData()
        layoutIfNeeded()
        setContentOffset(lastScrollOffset, animated: false)
    }
}
  • May you please add some explanation for your code? – Baaing Cow Oct 19 '18 at 20:46
0

Try to call cell.layoutSubviews() before returning cell in func cellForRowAtIndexPath(_ indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell?. It's known bug in iOS8.

0

There is a bug which I believe was introduced in iOS11.

That is when you do a reload the tableView contentOffSet gets unexpectedly altered. In fact contentOffset should not change after a reload. It tends to happen due to miscalculations of UITableViewAutomaticDimension

You have to save your contentOffSet and set it back to your saved value after your reload is finished.

func reloadTableOnMain(with offset: CGPoint = CGPoint.zero){

    DispatchQueue.main.async { [weak self] () in

        self?.tableView.reloadData()
        self?.tableView.layoutIfNeeded()
        self?.tableView.contentOffset = offset
    }
}

How you use it?

someFunctionThatMakesChangesToYourDatasource()
let offset = tableview.contentOffset
reloadTableOnMain(with: offset)

This answer was derived from here

0

None of these solutions worked for me. Here's what I did with Swift 4 & Xcode 10.1...

In viewDidLoad(), declare table dynamic row height and create correct constraints in cells...

tableView.rowHeight = UITableView.automaticDimension

Also in viewDidLoad(), register all your tableView cell nibs to tableview like this:

tableView.register(UINib(nibName: "YourTableViewCell", bundle: nil), forCellReuseIdentifier: "YourTableViewCell")
tableView.register(UINib(nibName: "YourSecondTableViewCell", bundle: nil), forCellReuseIdentifier: "YourSecondTableViewCell")
tableView.register(UINib(nibName: "YourThirdTableViewCell", bundle: nil), forCellReuseIdentifier: "YourThirdTableViewCell")

In tableView heightForRowAt, return height equal to each cell's height at indexPath.row...

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, heightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {

    if indexPath.row == 0 {
        let cell = Bundle.main.loadNibNamed("YourTableViewCell", owner: self, options: nil)?.first as! YourTableViewCell
        return cell.layer.frame.height
    } else if indexPath.row == 1 {
        let cell = Bundle.main.loadNibNamed("YourSecondTableViewCell", owner: self, options: nil)?.first as! YourSecondTableViewCell
        return cell.layer.frame.height
    } else {
        let cell = Bundle.main.loadNibNamed("YourThirdTableViewCell", owner: self, options: nil)?.first as! YourThirdTableViewCell
        return cell.layer.frame.height
    } 

}

Now give an estimated row height for each cell in tableView estimatedHeightForRowAt. Be accurate as you can...

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {

    if indexPath.row == 0 {
        return 400 // or whatever YourTableViewCell's height is
    } else if indexPath.row == 1 {
        return 231 // or whatever YourSecondTableViewCell's height is
    } else {
        return 216 // or whatever YourThirdTableViewCell's height is
    } 

}

That should work...

I didn't need to save and set contentOffset when calling tableView.reloadData()

0

I have 2 different cell heights.

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, heightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {
        let cellHeight = CGFloat(checkIsCleanResultSection(index: indexPath.row) ? 130 : 160)
        return Helper.makeDeviceSpecificCommonSize(cellHeight)
    }

After I added estimatedHeightForRowAt, there was no more jumping.

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, estimatedHeightForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> CGFloat {
    let cellHeight = CGFloat(checkIsCleanResultSection(index: indexPath.row) ? 130 : 160)
    return Helper.makeDeviceSpecificCommonSize(cellHeight)
}

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