15

I have what I would consider a fairly common setup, but I am seeing a pretty strange animation issue.

Storyboard

There's a navigation controller inside of a tab bar. If I push on that navigation controller, I can still see the previous viewController's red view in the navigation bar during the push animation, but only when I have hidesBottomBarWhenPushed set to yes on the destination viewController (on the very right). This is a reduced example of the issue, and it can all be set up in a storyboard.

Here's an animation of the transition. Watch the navigation bar. You can see the previous red view controller in the background, go partially off screen, then disappear at the end.

Has anyone solved this issue? Am I doing something unsupported? Is this a bug? I definitely want to keep translucent bars and hiding the tab bar on push, but I'm open to ways of reliably hiding the tab bar in some other way that supports translucent tab bars.

Animation

  • 1
    Did you find out why this is happening? – Gurpartap Singh Feb 6 '15 at 23:59
  • As a clue, I found out that the view in the far right view controller "moves" to fit the screen after it has finished getting pushed. Something to do with auto layout? – Gurpartap Singh Feb 7 '15 at 0:01
  • No I haven't. For now I'm postponing implementing translucent nav bars until I can find a good solution. – Acey Feb 7 '15 at 0:02
  • have you tried my solution... it's working for me... let me know whether its helpful for you or not.. – Madan gupta Feb 13 '15 at 13:13
  • 1
    It's a bit hacky, but you can try setting the background color of the TabBarController's view. It should help. – Allen Ding Aug 10 '15 at 17:42
9

Here's what I've found so far:

#1 Top right bar is black

The blurred black part on the top right of the top bar is the UIWindow behind the translucent UINavigationbar, with backgroundColor defaulting to blackColor.

The screenshot demonstrates this by setting the pushed view's background to clearColor.

enter image description here

As a workaround, setting the UIWindow's backgroundColor property to your desired background colour fixes this problem as long as you also have the property edgesForExtendedLayout of the view controller to push set to .Top.

func application(application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [NSObject: AnyObject]?) -> Bool {
    window?.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()
    return true
}

class ViewToPushViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        self.edgesForExtendedLayout = UIRectEdge.Top
        // Or set it from the Attributes Inspector in IB.
        // See screenshot below.
    }
}

I consider this a workaround since I believe modifying UIWindow's backgroundColor property is not necessarily what we should have to do. Perhaps, future iOS version can address this issue.

#2 View content "moving downwards" after push animation finishes

If you have a subview with a bottom layout guide and the views "move down", I haven't found any ideal fix yet. However, setting the tab bar to hidden helps to some extent. As a caveat and as expected, hiding the tab bar also immediately hides it from parent view controller during the push animation (although it becomes visible again during the animation when popping the view).

class ViewToPushViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        // ...

        self.tabBarController?.tabBar.hidden = true
    }
}

Make sure ViewToPushViewController's hidesBottomBarWhenPushed property is set to true before it is pushed (either in the interface builder attributes inspector or in prepareForSegue method in the parent view controller).

enter image description here

Make sure you're also testing the animation behaviour when popping the view with back button.

|improve this answer|||||
  • #1 isn't working for me. After setting the window's background color to blue, (seen here imgur.com/AaL4avY) you can see the color appears under the bar, but it only extends part of the way. Even if I choose to use green instead of blue, it wouldn't line up. – Acey Feb 7 '15 at 4:35
  • And #2 isn't satisfactory. Hiding the tab bar immediately is too abrupt and looks perhaps worse than the translucency issue. Thanks for your suggestions though! – Acey Feb 7 '15 at 4:37
  • Yeah, I agree that #2 is not a satisfactory solution. For #1, did you set self.edgesForExtendedLayout = UIRectEdge.Top? If you set it so, you may only need to set window bgColor for the pop animation to behave. – Gurpartap Singh Feb 7 '15 at 5:47
  • For #1, I've left edgesForExtendedLayout to the default of UIRectEdgeAll for the first viewController (needed to have content under the translucent tab bar) and I've tried both UIRectEdgeTop and All for the destination viewController, neither work. The image you included for #1 doesn't seem to have a tab bar. Maybe that's why it looks good for you? – Acey Feb 9 '15 at 18:27
  • It has a tab bar, which was visible in the parent view (with those table separators in picture ), but was hidden when the view was pushed. – Gurpartap Singh Feb 9 '15 at 20:56
4

You may have UITabBarController class, and its background is empty. and window default background is black.

in Swift 2

without changing an anatomy of app:

func application(application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [NSObject: AnyObject]?) -> Bool {
    // Override point ...
    window?.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()
    return true
}
|improve this answer|||||
1

I setup my storyboard like you showed with the same segues etc and got the same weird animation. After looking around for a resolution and playing with the code I got to this.

Use this in the destination view controller, hope this helps.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    [self hideTabBar];
}

- (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillDisappear:animated];

    [self showTabBar];
}

- (void)hideTabBar
{
    UITabBar *tabBar = self.tabBarController.tabBar;
    UIView *parent = tabBar.superview;
    UIView *content = [parent.subviews objectAtIndex:0];
    UIView *window = parent.superview;

    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.5
                     animations:^{
                         CGRect tabFrame = tabBar.frame;
                         tabFrame.origin.y = CGRectGetMaxY(window.bounds);
                         tabBar.frame = tabFrame;
                         content.frame = window.bounds;
                     }];
}

- (void)showTabBar
{
    UITabBar *tabBar = self.tabBarController.tabBar;
    UIView *parent = tabBar.superview;
    UIView *content = [parent.subviews objectAtIndex:0];
    UIView *window = parent.superview;

    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.5
                     animations:^{
                         CGRect tabFrame = tabBar.frame;
                         tabFrame.origin.y = CGRectGetMaxY(window.bounds) - CGRectGetHeight(tabBar.frame);
                         tabBar.frame = tabFrame;

                         CGRect contentFrame = content.frame;
                         contentFrame.size.height -= tabFrame.size.height;
                     }];
}

P.s. How did you make that very cool gif, will come in very handy.

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  • I created a screen recording using Quicktime, used ffmpeg to convert that to a series of PNGs, sips to swap those to 'gif' images (for compression mainly), then gifsicle to merge them together. This is a good guide (chrismessina.me/b/13913393/mov-to-gif). I think there are one step apps on the App Store, but this was free =) – Acey Feb 11 '15 at 19:09
  • Thanks for that, will use it in the future. – Erion S Feb 11 '15 at 19:12
  • @Acey Did you try my code out? Or have you figured out another way of doing it. If so, please show it on here so I can see how you went about doing it. – Erion S Feb 12 '15 at 0:48
  • I'd really like to no manually position the tab bar. It seems like that's the UITabBarController's job. Also grabbing the first subview from the tab bars container view isn't safe and wouldn't be guaranteed to work on different versions of iOS depending on UITabBarController's implementation. There's also the problem of showing the tab bar when pushing to another viewController from here. The tab bar would return when we'd want it kept hidden, which is something hidesBottomBarWhenPush provides. Also, what about pushing and popping the nav controller to root? There's too much state to maintain. – Acey Feb 12 '15 at 21:38
  • 1
    Whenever you figure it out, please upload it here so I can see. – Erion S Feb 13 '15 at 0:42
0

Just set window's background color and navigation bar's appearance in application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {
    self.window.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    [UINavigationBar appearance].translucent = NO;
    return YES;
}
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0

Set UITabBarController's view backgroundColor may work

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-1

I found answer with Objective-C ! even if it is fit for your situation!

AnotherViewController *av = [[AnotherViewController alloc] init];

// Set Controller View`s Color

self.navigationController.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];

[self setHidesBottomBarWhenPushed:YES];

[self.navigationController pushViewController:av animated:YES];

if you change the view`s color to specific color(Red, Blue...) , you will know how this code work~

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