143

I have a Series like this after doing groupby('name') and used mean() function on other column

name
383      3.000000
663      1.000000
726      1.000000
737      9.000000
833      8.166667

Could anyone please show me how to filter out the rows with 1.000000 mean values? Thank you and I greatly appreciate your help.

1
  • Well, how would you filter a series upon a given condition?
    – user554546
    Feb 2, 2015 at 6:23

7 Answers 7

181
In [5]:

import pandas as pd

test = {
383:    3.000000,
663:    1.000000,
726:    1.000000,
737:    9.000000,
833:    8.166667
}

s = pd.Series(test)
s = s[s != 1]
s
Out[0]:
383    3.000000
737    9.000000
833    8.166667
dtype: float64
2
  • 13
    I prefer the answers below because they can be chained (i.e. no need to define s and then use it twice in the expression). Only works from pandas 0.18 though.
    – IanS
    May 9, 2017 at 7:56
  • Also see timing comparisons in piRSquared's answer.
    – IanS
    May 9, 2017 at 7:58
93

From pandas version 0.18+ filtering a series can also be done as below

test = {
383:    3.000000,
663:    1.000000,
726:    1.000000,
737:    9.000000,
833:    8.166667
}

pd.Series(test).where(lambda x : x!=1).dropna()

Checkout: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/version/0.18.1/whatsnew.html#method-chaininng-improvements

2
  • 3
    So much nicer with method chaining (and reminds me of Spark.)
    – Dylan Hogg
    Aug 8, 2017 at 9:14
  • 2
    True but Spark does something more intuitive in this case: it simply gets rid of rows that don't match the predicate, that means not using the ".dropna()" part which seemed clearly superfluous to me until I read the doc. Got bitten by that :D Mar 17, 2020 at 13:53
68

As DACW pointed out, there are method-chaining improvements in pandas 0.18.1 that do what you are looking for very nicely.

Rather than using .where, you can pass your function to either the .loc indexer or the Series indexer [] and avoid the call to .dropna:

test = pd.Series({
383:    3.000000,
663:    1.000000,
726:    1.000000,
737:    9.000000,
833:    8.166667
})

test.loc[lambda x : x!=1]

test[lambda x: x!=1]

Similar behavior is supported on the DataFrame and NDFrame classes.

1
  • 3
    This is my favorite answer, and it also seems to be the fastest without going down to numpy (see timing comparisons).
    – IanS
    May 9, 2017 at 8:04
29

A fast way of doing this is to reconstruct using numpy to slice the underlying arrays. See timings below.

mask = s.values != 1
pd.Series(s.values[mask], s.index[mask])

0
383    3.000000
737    9.000000
833    8.166667
dtype: float64

naive timing

enter image description here

2
  • ,I like your method, I wanna know what if I have multi-masks. Thx Jul 7, 2017 at 10:14
  • 1
    @MenglongLi depends, you should ask a question. Most likely, you'd combine them with &. mask = mask1 & mask2
    – piRSquared
    Jul 7, 2017 at 14:19
7

Another way is to first convert to a DataFrame and use the query method (assuming you have numexpr installed):

import pandas as pd

test = {
383:    3.000000,
663:    1.000000,
726:    1.000000,
737:    9.000000,
833:    8.166667
}

s = pd.Series(test)
s.to_frame(name='x').query("x != 1")
2
  • I don't think that it's a good idea to pass a condition as a string Aug 17, 2017 at 9:53
  • 2
    This adds all the overhead of a dataframe, and is going to be very slow. Nov 19, 2018 at 13:11
5

If you like a chained operation, you can also use compress function:

test = pd.Series({
383:    3.000000,
663:    1.000000,
726:    1.000000,
737:    9.000000,
833:    8.166667
})

test.compress(lambda x: x != 1)

# 383    3.000000
# 737    9.000000
# 833    8.166667
# dtype: float64
1
  • 2
    Please note pandas.Series.compress is deprecated since version 0.24.0. of pandas.
    – ipj
    Jan 18, 2021 at 17:56
2

In my case I had a pandas Series where the values are tuples of characters:

Out[67]
0    (H, H, H, H)
1    (H, H, H, T)
2    (H, H, T, H)
3    (H, H, T, T)
4    (H, T, H, H)

Therefore I could use indexing to filter the series, but to create the index I needed apply. My condition is "find all tuples which have exactly one 'H'".

series_of_tuples[series_of_tuples.apply(lambda x: x.count('H')==1)]

I admit it is not "chainable", (i.e. notice I repeat series_of_tuples twice; you must store any temporary series into a variable so you can call apply(...) on it).

There may also be other methods (besides .apply(...)) which can operate elementwise to produce a Boolean index.

Many other answers (including accepted answer) using the chainable functions like:

  • .compress()
  • .where()
  • .loc[]
  • []

These accept callables (lambdas) which are applied to the Series, not to the individual values in those series!

Therefore my Series of tuples behaved strangely when I tried to use my above condition / callable / lambda, with any of the chainable functions, like .loc[]:

series_of_tuples.loc[lambda x: x.count('H')==1]

Produces the error:

KeyError: 'Level H must be same as name (None)'

I was very confused, but it seems to be using the Series.count series_of_tuples.count(...) function , which is not what I wanted.

I admit that an alternative data structure may be better:

  • A Category datatype?
  • A Dataframe (each element of the tuple becomes a column)
  • A Series of strings (just concatenate the tuples together):

This creates a series of strings (i.e. by concatenating the tuple; joining the characters in the tuple on a single string)

series_of_tuples.apply(''.join)

So I can then use the chainable Series.str.count

series_of_tuples.apply(''.join).str.count('H')==1

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