28

It feels like java 8 streams and mapping functions are so verbose they aren't really an improvement. For example, I wrote some code that uses a collection to generate another, modified collection:

private List<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    List<DartField> fields = new ArrayList<>();
    for (Field field : model.getDeclaredFields()) {
        if (!Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers())) {
            fields.add(DartField.getDartField(field));
        }
    }
    return fields;
}

This seems like the ideal use case for java 8 streams and their functions, so I rewrote it like that:

private List<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return Arrays.asList(model.getDeclaredFields())
            .stream()
            .filter(field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(field -> DartField.getDartField(field))
            .collect(Collectors.toList());
}

But I'm not sure I like that more. It's 236 characters as compared to 239 in normal-style java. It doesn't seem more or less readable. It's nice that you don't have to declare an ArrayList, but needing to call .collect(Collectors.toList()) and Arrays.asList (depending on the data type) isn't any better.

Is there some practical improvement to using .stream() like this that I just don't get, or is this just a fun way to throw any coworkers for a loop who don't know functional programming?

I suppose if I were dynamically passing around filter or map lambdas it would be useful, but if you don't need to do that ...

6
  • 3
    Imho it's much more readable because you can see at once that the data are filtered and mapped. You don't really know what's happening in your first example until you've gone through the whole code. Now imagine something more complex. Feb 2, 2015 at 15:51
  • 2
    A few years later I've converted to using functional programming for this kind of process most of the time, but with Kotlin. In Kotlin this kind of operation is succinct, looks nice, and it has tons of great convenience methods like mapNotNull flatMap etc.
    – CorayThan
    Aug 24, 2018 at 17:50
  • The first example is much clearer. Don't use streams. Most systems today look aweful because of post java 7 programmers making an entry and jumping onto the streams immediately and keeping up with it. 90% of systems today look aweful becaues of that. java is not a language for this level of functional programming. I have no iterations of lists in my code anywhere, yet with people that rely on streams you see this kind of iteration all the time, because they think it is convenient.
    – mjs
    Oct 11, 2021 at 16:25
  • And @abetteroliver Rarely are there ever more complex scenarios. In fact, the only the times I've seen plenty of complex scenarios like the ones you mention is in code written by people that overdo the streams thing. They do this constantly and filter all the the time, over and over again. Often lengthy statements. Then good luck refactoring and breaking out all those lambdas. Are you one of those? Real hardcore Java developers that made an entry to Java post Java 11 are rare to be seen. Any new entrant will start using stream and get stuck in that world. Building a codebase based on them.
    – mjs
    Oct 11, 2021 at 16:30
  • And never getting out and just getting themselves deeper and deeper in ****. The only way you can deal with this is the hard way. Completely forbid its usage. Otherwise it is a slippery slope. And trust me, my code is a polished Ferrari. It would never have been if I relied on Java Streams.
    – mjs
    Oct 11, 2021 at 16:34

8 Answers 8

37

The problem is that you are not using the Stream API consistently. You are restricting the use case to something which can be best described as “actually not using the Stream API” as you are insisting on returning a Collection. That’s especially absurd as it’s a private method so you are entirely able to adapt the callers as well.

Consider to change the method to

private Stream<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return Stream.of(model.getDeclaredFields())
            .filter(field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(field -> DartField.getDartField(field));
}

and look what the caller(s) actually want to do. Usually they don’t need a Collection as an end in itself, but want to perform an action or even more operations which could be chained, e.g. print them:

getDartFields(Foo.class).forEach(System.out::println);

The most interesting feature is the lazy nature of the stream, which implies that upon getDartFields return, no action has been performed yet and if you use operations like findFirst, there is no need to process all elements. You’ll lose this feature if you return a Collection containing all elements.

This also applies to multi-step processing where processing ordinary lists implies that for each step a new list has to be created and populated with results.

7
  • 3
    Good (great) answer. Because it is verbose unless the new lazy paradigm is used. I'd have to wonder why the Java 8 crew didn't make a few functions intrinsic on Arrays and Lists, etc.? All arrays could have 'foreach' , 'filter', 'map' as first class methods. Java has a long way to go to achieve concision! Until then, Stream.of( ... ) will be our new friend. Feb 2, 2015 at 19:06
  • 1
    @Saint Hill: in principle, as arrays are (special) classes which can implement interfaces, all arrays could implement List as add and remove are specified as optional so arrays don’t need to support them. Being a List would imply that they have a forEach and a stream method…
    – Holger
    Feb 3, 2015 at 8:32
  • 4
    Absurd is a bit harsh. I've found problems passing streams and forth, mainly because people end up traversing it more than once, so we tend to concretize before leaving method scope.
    – orbfish
    Feb 16, 2017 at 16:01
  • 1
    @orbfish: that’s a statement specific to this scenario. Still, if you need a materialized collection in some cases, there is no need to let the private method return a collection in all cases. The caller still can collect if needed.
    – Holger
    Feb 16, 2017 at 16:09
  • 1
    @mmm how do you implement “all of the above” in a loop when you don’t know which terminal operation the caller will actually append? The whole point of this answer is that a consistent use of the stream API is to return a Stream because the caller can decide to chain, e.g. .findFirst() or .parallel().toArray() or .sorted(…).limit(20).collect(Collectors.toList()), which do entirely different things.
    – Holger
    May 5, 2021 at 8:26
8

You can write it differently (not necessarily better)

private List<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return Stream.of(model.getDeclaredFields())
            .filter(field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(DartField::getDartField)
            .collect(Collectors.toList());
}

Using static imports this looks like

private static List<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return of(model.getDeclaredFields())
            .filter(field -> !isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(DartField::getDartField)
            .collect(toList());
}

It doesn't seem more or less readable.

This is often the case IMHO. However, I would say that in >10% of cases it is significantly better. Like any new feature, you will probably over use it to start with until you get familiar with it and find you use it the amount you feel comfortable with.

Is there some practical improvement to using .stream() like this that I just don't get, or is this just a fun way to throw any coworkers for a loop who don't know functional programming?

I suspect both. If you don't know functional programming, it tends to be read only code. i.e. you can still understand what it does, the problem is if you have to maintain it.

IMHO, it is worth encouraging developers to learn functional programming as it has some very useful ideas about how to structure your code and you would benefit from it even if you didn't use FP syntax.

Where the Streams API is useful in constructs you previously wouldn't have bother implementing.

E.g. say you want to index the field by name.

private static Map<String, DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return of(model.getDeclaredFields())
            .filter(field -> !isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(DartField::getDartField)
            .collect(groupingBy(f -> f.getName()));
}

In the past you might have used a List instead of a Map, but by making the assembly of Map easier you might use the data structure you really should be using more often.

Now lets see if it would be faster if we used more threads.

private static Map<String, DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return of(model.getDeclaredFields()).parallel()
            .filter(field -> !isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
            .map(DartField::getDartField)
            .collect(groupingByConcurrent(f -> f.getName()));
}

See how hard that was, and changing it back when you find it probably does more harm than good, is pretty easy too.

1
  • 2
    It's too bad I can't accept multiple answers on this one. A lot of people make good points I hadn't thought of.
    – CorayThan
    Feb 3, 2015 at 6:10
4

Java 8 streams are particularly verbose, most due to converting to a stream and then back to another structure. In FunctionalJava, the equivalent is:

private List<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return List.list(model.getDeclaredFields())
        .filter(field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
        .map(field -> DartField.getDartField(field))
        .toJavaList();
}

I warn against just counting characters as a measure of complexity. This barely matters.

Functional programming allows you to reason about your code using a simple substitution model, rather than having to trace through your entire program. This makes your program more predictable and easier because you need fewer pieces of information in your head at once.

I also warn against returning streams. Streams are not arbitrarily composable, streams are mutable data where callers have no way of knowing if a terminal operation has been called on the stream. This means we need to know the state of the program to reason about what is happening. Streams were introduced to help eliminate mutable state, but are implemented using mutable state - far from ideal.

If you want an immutable stream, I recommend Functional Java's stream, https://functionaljava.ci.cloudbees.com/job/master/javadoc/fj/data/Stream.html.

10
  • 3
    I see no danger stemming from consumed streams---that's trivially detectable and debuggable, plus that sort of error doesn't really happen in practice. Plus, I actually respect the way the Streams API approaches mutability: it offers the performance advantages of mutability, but puts the actual mutation under strict control. Feb 2, 2015 at 13:46
  • 1
    The FJ Stream, from the looks of it, imposes serious memory overheads, just like Clojure's lazy collections. This is exactly the pitfall avoided by Java's streams. BTW it is interesting to note that Rich Hickey's Reducers are a conceptual adaptation of Java's Streams API, with the same advantages. Feb 2, 2015 at 13:49
  • The danger from streams is exactly the argument of mutability vs immutability. Java 8 argues in favour of streams to avoid mutability, but doesn't take this idea far enough. Streams are only useful in a limited scope because the type don't enforce type safety.
    – Mark Perry
    Feb 3, 2015 at 10:43
  • Yes, that would surely sum up the position of the statically-typed FP camp. Java's type system is weak in many other ways as well and the way the Streams API is designed meshes quite well with everything else. I find the API to be a very good fit for the Java ecosystem and most of its advantages are not related to static type safety. Feb 3, 2015 at 10:45
  • Marko, perhaps you could expand on this point or provide a link on why it imposes serious memory overheads. I don't see how this occurs, unless the stream is cached.
    – Mark Perry
    Feb 3, 2015 at 11:12
3

If you specifically constrain your use case to just what you have posted, then a Stream-based idiom is not substantially better. However, if you are interested to find out where the Streams API is a true benefit, here are some points:

  • the Stream-based idiom can be parallelized with no virtually effort on your part (this is actually the strongest reason why Java got lambdas in the first place);
  • Streams are composable: you can pass them around and add pipeline stages. This can greatly benefit code reuse;
  • as you already noted, you can also pass around lambdas: it is easy to write template methods where you plug in just one aspect of processing;
  • once you are comfortable with the idiom, FP code is actually more readable as it is more closely related to the what instead of the how. This advantage increases with the complexity of the processing logic.

I would additionally note that the difference in readability is more a historical artifact than intrinsic to the idioms: if developers were taught FP from the start and worked with it day-to-day, then it would be the imperative idiom which was odd and hard to follow.

3

Not worth it if you insist on getting back to collections. However, you have missed an opportunity - consider the following and you should see where using streams adds a level of flexibility and composability to your code:

private static final Predicate<Field> isStatic
        = field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers());

private Stream<Field> getDeclaredFields(Class<?> model) {
    return Stream.of(model.getDeclaredFields());
}

private Stream<Field> getStaticFields(Class<?> model) {
    return getDeclaredFields(model).filter(isStatic);
}

private Stream<DartField> getDartFields(Class<?> model) {
    return getStaticFields(model)
            .map(field -> DartField.getDartField(field));
}

The point is that you can use streams as collections instead of mechanisms to build new collections.

By allowing all of the natural methods to just fall out of the algorithm you end up with patently obvious code that is almost inevitably reusable and each component naturally does its one thing.

3
  • Instead of your getStaticFields(Stream) I would strongly prefer just storing the lambda: public final Predicate<..> isStatic = field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()). That's important because with your model you get prefix notation whereas with this approach you could have getDeclaredFields(model).filter(isStatic). Similar for other methods. Feb 2, 2015 at 12:22
  • @MarkoTopolnik - That is an elegant step towards the much nicer prefix notation. It looks like a small back-step though as I was trying to demonstrate passing streams around as a better approach. It does nicely introduce lambdas into the mix though so I will change the code. Feb 2, 2015 at 12:34
  • Indeed, I choose to pass the whole stream only when the method does more than add a single step to the pipeline. When you get into serious composition, you gradually start hating every place you are forced to pass in the stream. If anything, that's one point I love about Clojure---you can chain anything you want. Feb 2, 2015 at 12:38
0

With Java 8 the team took an Object oriented programming language, and applied the "Objectification" to produce Functional Object oriented programming(lol...FOOP). It will take some time to get used to this, but I argue that any and all hierarchical Object manipulation should remain in its Functional state. From this perspective Java feels like it bridges the PHP gap; Allow the data to exist in its natural state, and mold it into the application GUI.

This is the true philosophy behind an API creation from a Software Engineering perspective.

0

Here is a shorter solution by StreamEx

StreamEx.of(model.getDeclaredFields())
        .filter(field -> !Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()))
        .map(DartField::getDartField)
        .toList();

I think it's shorter/simpler, comparing to original for loop.

List<DartField> fields = new ArrayList<>();
for (Field field : model.getDeclaredFields()) {
    if (!Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers())) {
        fields.add(DartField.getDartField(field));
    }
}
return fields;

The more important thing is more flexible. Jut think about if you want do more filter/map, or sort/limit/groupBy/..., you just need to add more stream API call, and code still keep concise, the nested for loop/if else will become more and more complicated.

0

From my perspective, java stream APIs(map, filter, forEach, groupBy...) actually facility data handling in the process of daily development. Instead of getting your hands dirty, you just tell the stream APIs what you want not how to do.

However, I'm not comfortable when reading the java codes populated with various related stream APIs. Sometimes, it's very wired when using stream APIs in the code format and layout, especially along with the function program. Shortly, it degrades the readability.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.