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So maybe I'm just overlooking something super basic but this is stumping me. I have an extremely simple test case: a plain HTML page, simple as can be, with two paragraphs and an unordered list, which has an ID, and one list item in the list. Here's what's baffling me:

  • If the <ul>'s id attribute is social-media, then the list item inside the list will not be rendered by Firefox for Android.
  • If the <ul> does not have an id attribute or has an id attribute whose value is literally anything other than social-media, then the list item inside the list will be rendered.

Is social-media a reserved ID value? For completeness, here's the entire test case, where the list item will not show up:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>Missing List Item Test Case</title>
    </head>
    <body>

        <p>This paragraph is visible.</p>
        <ul id="social-media">
            <li>This list item is not visible if and only if the parent UL has an ID of "social-media". Why?</li>
        </ul>
        <p>This paragraph is also visible.</p>

    </body>
</html>

Also for completeness, my Android device is running KitKat (4.4.x) and my Firefox is version 35. There are no software updates available for either.

In what circumstances can the value of an ID attribute alone, without any CSS files or other styling information, cause a rendering disparity on only one browser? Is this a bug in Firefox?

Edited to add: Looks like Firefox also refuses to display the list item if the <ul> element's id value is socialmedia (no dash), but will display the list item if the id value is something like blahblahblah or societysucks and basically anything else.

  • Oh wow, I didn't know AdBlock did that. And you were totally right. I didn't even remember I had AdBlock installed. Thank you! I was about to think I was literally going insane. – Meitar Feb 2 '15 at 10:34
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This could be caused by Ad-blocking software. Often an option on these is to prune out social-media type tasks and one of the ways it identifies these is through element attributes. You can also find if you use font-awesome or something along those lines it disables certain icons.

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  • facepalm That was it. This is why I should never code at 3:30 AM after an otherwise equally frustrating day. I am off my game, yo. – Meitar Feb 2 '15 at 10:56
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I'd start by running the code through the w3c validator

<htma lang="en">

Should be

<html lang="en">

(html not htma)

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  • LOL! Thank you. :) That was definitely an error on my part (I should've copy-and-pasted). However, I have fixed that silly mistake and the issue persists. :( – Meitar Feb 2 '15 at 10:30

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