468

How do I sort a NumPy array by its nth column?

For example, given:

a = array([[9, 2, 3],
           [4, 5, 6],
           [7, 0, 5]])

I want to sort the rows of a by the second column to obtain:

array([[7, 0, 5],
       [9, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])
4
  • 14
    This is a really bad example since np.sort(a, axis=0) would be a satisfactory solution for the given matrix. I suggested an edit with a better example but was rejected, although actually the question would be much more clear. The example should be something like a = numpy.array([[1, 2, 3], [6, 5, 2], [3, 1, 1]]) with desired output array([[3, 1, 1], [1, 2, 3], [6, 5, 2]])
    – David
    Aug 4, 2017 at 16:16
  • 54
    David, you don't get the point of the question. He wants to keep the order within each row the same.
    – marcorossi
    Nov 8, 2017 at 23:22
  • 6
    @marcorossi I did get the point, but the example was very badly formulated because, as I said, there were multiple possible answers (which, however, wouldn't have satisfied the OP's request). A later edit based on my comment has indeed been approved (funny that mine got rejected, though). So now everything is fine.
    – David
    Jun 9, 2020 at 9:51
  • I think using a structured array could be a way to make the code more readable. I attached a possible answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/67788660/13890678
    – lhoupert
    Jun 1, 2021 at 12:15

16 Answers 16

939

To sort by the second column of a:

a[a[:, 1].argsort()]
11
  • 6
    This is not clear, what is 1 in here? the index to be sorted by?
    – orezvani
    Apr 14, 2014 at 5:30
  • 43
    [:,1] indicates the second column of a.
    – Steve Tjoa
    Apr 17, 2014 at 20:49
  • 81
    If you want the reverse sort, modify this to be a[a[:,1].argsort()[::-1]] May 14, 2015 at 14:49
  • 23
    I find this easier to read: ind = np.argsort( a[:,1] ); a = a[ind]
    – poppie
    Feb 13, 2017 at 3:40
  • 2
    a[a[:,k].argsort()] is the same as a[a[:,k].argsort(),:]. This generalizes to the other dimension (sort cols using a row): a[:,a[j,:].argsort()] (hope i typed that right.)
    – bean
    Feb 4, 2018 at 17:40
175

@steve's answer is actually the most elegant way of doing it.

For the "correct" way see the order keyword argument of numpy.ndarray.sort

However, you'll need to view your array as an array with fields (a structured array).

The "correct" way is quite ugly if you didn't initially define your array with fields...

As a quick example, to sort it and return a copy:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: a = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[0,0,1]])

In [3]: np.sort(a.view('i8,i8,i8'), order=['f1'], axis=0).view(np.int)
Out[3]: 
array([[0, 0, 1],
       [1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])

To sort it in-place:

In [6]: a.view('i8,i8,i8').sort(order=['f1'], axis=0) #<-- returns None

In [7]: a
Out[7]: 
array([[0, 0, 1],
       [1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])

@Steve's really is the most elegant way to do it, as far as I know...

The only advantage to this method is that the "order" argument is a list of the fields to order the search by. For example, you can sort by the second column, then the third column, then the first column by supplying order=['f1','f2','f0'].

14
  • 4
    In my numpy 1.6.1rc1, it raises ValueError: new type not compatible with array.
    – Clippit
    Oct 5, 2011 at 17:40
  • 11
    Would it make sense to file a feature request that the "correct" way be made less ugly?
    – endolith
    Aug 21, 2013 at 3:15
  • 6
    What if the values in the array are float? Should I change anything?
    – Marco
    Mar 23, 2014 at 9:23
  • 12
    One major advantage of this method over Steve's is that it allows very large arrays to be sorted in place. For a sufficiently large array, the indices returned by np.argsort may themselve take up quite a lot of memory, and on top of that, indexing with an array will also generate a copy of the array that is being sorted.
    – ali_m
    Jul 11, 2015 at 23:38
  • 6
    Can someone explain the 'i8,i8,i8'? This is for each column or each row? What should change if sorting a different dtype? How do I find out how many bits are being used? Thank you
    – evn
    Nov 28, 2020 at 23:52
50

You can sort on multiple columns as per Steve Tjoa's method by using a stable sort like mergesort and sorting the indices from the least significant to the most significant columns:

a = a[a[:,2].argsort()] # First sort doesn't need to be stable.
a = a[a[:,1].argsort(kind='mergesort')]
a = a[a[:,0].argsort(kind='mergesort')]

This sorts by column 0, then 1, then 2.

3
  • 5
    Why does First Sort not need to be stable? Oct 26, 2016 at 20:59
  • 13
    Good question - stable means that when there's a tie you maintain the original order, and the original order of the unsorted file is irrelevant.
    – J.J
    Oct 27, 2016 at 13:06
  • This seems like a really super important point. having a list that silently doesn’t sort would be bad.
    – Clumsy cat
    May 21, 2018 at 9:07
24

In case someone wants to make use of sorting at a critical part of their programs here's a performance comparison for the different proposals:

import numpy as np
table = np.random.rand(5000, 10)

%timeit table.view('f8,f8,f8,f8,f8,f8,f8,f8,f8,f8').sort(order=['f9'], axis=0)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.88 ms per loop

%timeit table[table[:,9].argsort()]
10000 loops, best of 3: 180 µs per loop

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame(table)
%timeit df.sort_values(9, ascending=True)
1000 loops, best of 3: 400 µs per loop

So, it looks like indexing with argsort is the quickest method so far...

23

As the Python documentation wiki suggests:

a = ([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [0, 0, 1]]); 
a = sorted(a, key=lambda a_entry: a_entry[1]) 
print a

Output:

[[[0, 0, 1], [1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]]]
3
  • 21
    With this solution, one gets a list instead of a NumPy array, so this might not always be convenient (takes more memory, is probably slower, etc.). Sep 28, 2011 at 20:13
  • this "solution" is slower by the most-upvoted answer by a factor of ... well, close to infinity actually
    – Jivan
    Jun 18, 2020 at 12:03
  • 1
    @Jivan Actually, this solution is faster than the most-upvoted answer by a factor of 5 imgur.com/a/IbqtPBL Nov 26, 2020 at 16:43
22

From the NumPy mailing list, here's another solution:

>>> a
array([[1, 2],
       [0, 0],
       [1, 0],
       [0, 2],
       [2, 1],
       [1, 0],
       [1, 0],
       [0, 0],
       [1, 0],
      [2, 2]])
>>> a[np.lexsort(np.fliplr(a).T)]
array([[0, 0],
       [0, 0],
       [0, 2],
       [1, 0],
       [1, 0],
       [1, 0],
       [1, 0],
       [1, 2],
       [2, 1],
       [2, 2]])
1
  • 5
    The correct generalization is a[np.lexsort(a.T[cols])]. where cols=[1] in the original question. Apr 11, 2018 at 13:12
8

I had a similar problem.

My Problem:

I want to calculate an SVD and need to sort my eigenvalues in descending order. But I want to keep the mapping between eigenvalues and eigenvectors. My eigenvalues were in the first row and the corresponding eigenvector below it in the same column.

So I want to sort a two-dimensional array column-wise by the first row in descending order.

My Solution

a = a[::, a[0,].argsort()[::-1]]

So how does this work?

a[0,] is just the first row I want to sort by.

Now I use argsort to get the order of indices.

I use [::-1] because I need descending order.

Lastly I use a[::, ...] to get a view with the columns in the right order.

4
import numpy as np
a=np.array([[21,20,19,18,17],[16,15,14,13,12],[11,10,9,8,7],[6,5,4,3,2]])
y=np.argsort(a[:,2],kind='mergesort')# a[:,2]=[19,14,9,4]
a=a[y]
print(a)

Desired output is [[6,5,4,3,2],[11,10,9,8,7],[16,15,14,13,12],[21,20,19,18,17]]

note that argsort(numArray) returns the indices of an numArray as it was supposed to be arranged in a sorted manner.

example

x=np.array([8,1,5]) 
z=np.argsort(x) #[1,3,0] are the **indices of the predicted sorted array**
print(x[z]) #boolean indexing which sorts the array on basis of indices saved in z

answer would be [1,5,8]

1
  • 1
    You sure its not [1,2,0]? Dec 20, 2020 at 6:04
3

A little more complicated lexsort example - descending on the 1st column, secondarily ascending on the 2nd. The tricks with lexsort are that it sorts on rows (hence the .T), and gives priority to the last.

In [120]: b=np.array([[1,2,1],[3,1,2],[1,1,3],[2,3,4],[3,2,5],[2,1,6]])
In [121]: b
Out[121]: 
array([[1, 2, 1],
       [3, 1, 2],
       [1, 1, 3],
       [2, 3, 4],
       [3, 2, 5],
       [2, 1, 6]])
In [122]: b[np.lexsort(([1,-1]*b[:,[1,0]]).T)]
Out[122]: 
array([[3, 1, 2],
       [3, 2, 5],
       [2, 1, 6],
       [2, 3, 4],
       [1, 1, 3],
       [1, 2, 1]])
1

Here is another solution considering all columns (more compact way of J.J's answer);

ar=np.array([[0, 0, 0, 1],
             [1, 0, 1, 0],
             [0, 1, 0, 0],
             [1, 0, 0, 1],
             [0, 0, 1, 0],
             [1, 1, 0, 0]])

Sort with lexsort,

ar[np.lexsort(([ar[:, i] for i in range(ar.shape[1]-1, -1, -1)]))]

Output:

array([[0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 0],
       [1, 1, 0, 0]])
1

Pandas Approach Just For Completeness:

a = np.array([[9, 2, 3],
              [4, 5, 6],
              [7, 0, 5]])              
a = pd.DataFrame(a) 

             
a.sort_values(1, ascending=True).to_numpy()
array([[7, 0, 5], # '1' means sort by second column
       [9, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])

prl900 Did the Benchmark, comparing with the accepted answer:

%timeit pandas_df.sort_values(9, ascending=True)
1000 loops, best of 3: 400 µs per loop

%timeit numpy_table[numpy_table[:,9].argsort()]
10000 loops, best of 3: 180 µs per loop  
0

It is an old question but if you need to generalize this to a higher than 2 dimension arrays, here is the solution than can be easily generalized:

np.einsum('ij->ij', a[a[:,1].argsort(),:])

This is an overkill for two dimensions and a[a[:,1].argsort()] would be enough per @steve's answer, however that answer cannot be generalized to higher dimensions. You can find an example of 3D array in this question.

Output:

[[7 0 5]
 [9 2 3]
 [4 5 6]]
0

#for sorting along column 1

indexofsort=np.argsort(dataset[:,0],axis=-1,kind='stable') 
dataset   = dataset[indexofsort,:]
0
def sort_np_array(x, column=None, flip=False):
    x = x[np.argsort(x[:, column])]
    if flip:
        x = np.flip(x, axis=0)
    return x

Array in the original question:

a = np.array([[9, 2, 3],
              [4, 5, 6],
              [7, 0, 5]])

The result of the sort_np_array function as expected by the author of the question:

sort_np_array(a, column=1, flip=False)
[2]: array([[7, 0, 5],
            [9, 2, 3],
            [4, 5, 6]])
0

Thanks to this post: https://stackoverflow.com/a/5204280/13890678

I found a more "generic" answer using structured array. I think one advantage of this method is that the code is easier to read.

import numpy as np
a = np.array([[9, 2, 3],
           [4, 5, 6],
           [7, 0, 5]])

struct_a = np.core.records.fromarrays(
    a.transpose(), names="col1, col2, col3", formats="i8, i8, i8"
)
struct_a.sort(order="col2")

print(struct_a)
[(7, 0, 5) (9, 2, 3) (4, 5, 6)]
0

Simply using sort, use column number based on which you want to sort.

a = np.array([1,1], [1,-1], [-1,1], [-1,-1]])
print (a)
a = a.tolist() 
a = np.array(sorted(a, key=lambda a_entry: a_entry[0]))
print (a)
0

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