151

I regularly need to delete all the data from my PostgreSQL database before a rebuild. How would I do this directly in SQL?

At the moment I've managed to come up with a SQL statement that returns all the commands I need to execute:

SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' ||  tablename || ';' FROM pg_tables WHERE tableowner='MYUSER';

But I can't see a way to execute them programmatically once I have them.

10 Answers 10

217

FrustratedWithFormsDesigner is correct, PL/pgSQL can do this. Here's the script:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(username IN VARCHAR) RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    statements CURSOR FOR
        SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables
        WHERE tableowner = username AND schemaname = 'public';
BEGIN
    FOR stmt IN statements LOOP
        EXECUTE 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(stmt.tablename) || ' CASCADE;';
    END LOOP;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

This creates a stored function (you need to do this just once) which you can afterwards use like this:

SELECT truncate_tables('MYUSER');
  • 1
    Had to rejig a little but after that it worked like a charm! I've never used plpgsql before so this would've taken me ages. Thanks! For anyone that needs it I've added the code I ended up using to the bottom of this post. – Sig May 13 '10 at 21:32
  • Sorry, I was probably thinking in Oracle PL/SQL :( I fixed the syntax error in my code above. – Henning May 14 '10 at 13:18
  • 1
    you can also move the SELECT statement directly to FOR loop. DECLARE r RECORD; then for loop: FOR r IN SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables LOOP – Michael Buen May 14 '10 at 13:55
  • 6
    I would add CASCADE to TRUNCATE TABLE – Bogdan Gusiev May 20 '10 at 11:35
  • 3
    OMG!! I just truncated all my tables in "public" schema.... pls add another parameter of "schema" so that the function truncates tables only on the schema that is provided! – roneo Dec 1 '17 at 13:07
90

Explicit cursors are rarely needed in plpgsql. Use the simpler and faster implicit cursor of a FOR loop:

Note: Since table names are not unique per database, you have to schema-qualify table names to be sure. Also, I limit the function to the default schema 'public'. Adapt to your needs, but be sure to exclude the system schemas pg_* and information_schema.

Be very careful with these functions. They nuke your database. I added a child safety device. Comment the RAISE NOTICE line and uncomment EXECUTE to prime the bomb ...

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_truncate_tables(_username text)
  RETURNS void AS
$func$
DECLARE
   _tbl text;
   _sch text;
BEGIN
   FOR _sch, _tbl IN 
      SELECT schemaname, tablename
      FROM   pg_tables
      WHERE  tableowner = _username
      AND    schemaname = 'public'
   LOOP
      RAISE NOTICE '%',
      -- EXECUTE  -- dangerous, test before you execute!
         format('TRUNCATE TABLE %I.%I CASCADE', _sch, _tbl);
   END LOOP;
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

format() requires Postgres 9.1 or later. In older versions concatenate the query string like this:

'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(_sch) || '.' || quote_ident(_tbl)  || ' CASCADE';

Single command, no loop

Since we can TRUNCATE multiple tables at once we don't need any cursor or loop at all:

Aggregate all table names and execute a single statement. Simpler, faster:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_truncate_tables(_username text)
  RETURNS void AS
$func$
BEGIN
   RAISE NOTICE '%', 
   -- EXECUTE  -- dangerous, test before you execute!
  (SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE '
       || string_agg(format('%I.%I', schemaname, tablename), ', ')
       || ' CASCADE'
   FROM   pg_tables
   WHERE  tableowner = _username
   AND    schemaname = 'public'
   );
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT truncate_tables('postgres');

Refined query

You don't even need a function. In Postgres 9.0+ you can execute dynamic commands in a DO statement. And in Postgres 9.5+ the syntax can be even simpler:

DO
$func$
BEGIN
   RAISE NOTICE '%', 
   -- EXECUTE
   (SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || string_agg(oid::regclass::text, ', ') || ' CASCADE'
    FROM   pg_class
    WHERE  relkind = 'r'  -- only tables
    AND    relnamespace = 'public'::regnamespace
   );
END
$func$;

About the difference between pg_class, pg_tables and information_schema.tables:

About regclass and quoted table names:

For repeated use

Create a "template" database (let's name it my_template) with your vanilla structure and all empty tables. Then go through a DROP / CREATE DATABASE cycle:

DROP DATABASE mydb;
CREATE DATABASE mydb TEMPLATE my_template;

This is extremely fast, because Postgres copies the whole structure on the file level. No concurrency issues or other overhead slowing you down.

If concurrent connections keep you from dropping the DB, consider:

  • 1
    It's worth noting that this last function wiped ALL databases. Not just the currently connected one.... yeah... call me naiive but that really wasn't clear from this post. – Amalgovinus Sep 10 '15 at 0:40
  • @Amalgovinus: Which last function? None of the functions in my answer touch anything outside the current database (except for DROP DATABASE mydb, obviously). Are you confusing schemas with databases, maybe? – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 10 '15 at 1:25
  • The very last one with DO $func$. I used the same schema name in two different databases, so it looks like my data was dropped from both. so yes, I was confusing those two – Amalgovinus Sep 10 '15 at 1:33
  • 3
    @Amalgovinus: No, that's impossible. The DO command (like any other SQL statement) is executed in the current database exclusively. Postgres has no way to access other databases in the same transaction. You would have to use dblink or FDW to do that. But it does affect all schemas in the current database - unless you add WHERE t.schemaname = 'public' to restrict the effect to one particular schema in this particular case. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 10 '15 at 1:36
  • 3
    Thanks for great answer, I'm using "Single command, no loop" which returns the TRUNCATE command, how should I go about executing it? – Mahyar Nov 5 '18 at 22:30
38

If I have to do this, I will simply create a schema sql of current db, then drop & create db, then load db with schema sql.

Below are the steps involved:

1) Create Schema dump of database (--schema-only)

pg_dump mydb -s > schema.sql

2) Drop database

drop database mydb;

3) Create Database

create database mydb;

4) Import Schema

psql mydb < schema.sql

9

In this case it would probably be better to just have an empty database that you use as a template and when you need to refresh, drop the existing database and create a new one from the template.

3

Could you use dynamic SQL to execute each statement in turn? You would probably have to write a PL/pgSQL script to do this.

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.3/static/plpgsql-statements.html (section 38.5.4. Executing Dynamic Commands)

3

You can do this with bash also:

#!/bin/bash
PGPASSWORD='' psql -h 127.0.0.1 -Upostgres sng --tuples-only --command "SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || schemaname || '.' ||  tablename || ';' FROM pg_tables WHERE schemaname in ('cms_test', 'ids_test', 'logs_test', 'sps_test');" | 
tr "\\n" " " | 
xargs -I{} psql -h 127.0.0.1 -Upostgres sng --command "{}"

You will need to adjust schema names, passwords and usernames to match your schemas.

3

Cleaning AUTO_INCREMENT version:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(username IN VARCHAR) RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    statements CURSOR FOR
        SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables
        WHERE tableowner = username AND schemaname = 'public';
BEGIN
    FOR stmt IN statements LOOP
        EXECUTE 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(stmt.tablename) || ' CASCADE;';

        IF EXISTS (
            SELECT column_name 
            FROM information_schema.columns 
            WHERE table_name=quote_ident(stmt.tablename) and column_name='id'
        ) THEN
           EXECUTE 'ALTER SEQUENCE ' || quote_ident(stmt.tablename) || '_id_seq RESTART WITH 1';
        END IF;

    END LOOP;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
3

Guys the better and clean way is to :

1) Create Schema dump of database (--schema-only) pg_dump mydb -s > schema.sql

2) Drop database drop database mydb;

3) Create Database create database mydb;

4) Import Schema psql mydb < schema.sql

It´s work for me!

Have a nice day. Hiram Walker

1

For removing the data and preserving the table-structures in pgAdmin you can do:

  • Right-click database -> backup, select "Schema only"
  • Drop the database
  • Create a new database and name it like the former
  • Right-click the new database -> restore -> select the backup, select "Schema only"
1

If you can use psql you can use \gexec meta command to execute query output;

SELECT
    format('TRUNCATE TABLE %I.%I', ns.nspname, c.relname)
  FROM pg_namespace ns 
  JOIN pg_class c ON ns.oid = c.relnamespace
  JOIN pg_roles r ON r.oid = c.relowner
  WHERE
    ns.nspname = 'table schema' AND                               -- add table schema criteria 
    r.rolname = 'table owner' AND                                 -- add table owner criteria
    ns.nspname NOT IN ('pg_catalog', 'information_schema') AND    -- exclude system schemas
    c.relkind = 'r' AND                                           -- tables only
    has_table_privilege(c.oid, 'TRUNCATE')                        -- check current user has truncate privilege
  \gexec 

Note that \gexec is introduced into the version 9.6

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