107

I am trying to add a dependency of Android Asynchronous Http Client into my project. So there are two build.gradle files in the project.

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As per my understanding, there are different kind of dependencies:

  1. One which defined on the root level of build.gradle (Project:My-app)
  2. One inside the buildscript of the build.gradle (Project:My-app)
  3. Another is build.gradle (Modules:app)

This question is about repositories for dependencies of the buildScript, explain a bit about first two types.

Also build.gradle (Project:My-app) says

// NOTE: Do not place your application dependencies here; they belong
// in the individual module build.gradle files

So I guess the dependency code of Android Asynchronous Http Client should be added in build.gradle (Module:app).

How does it all fit together?

4
  • 3
    if external library, yes you should add at build.gradle(Modules:app) or go to File -> Project Structure -> Modules -> (Choose project you want to add library) -> Dependencies where you will see a green cross sign, by tapping that choose Module Dependency and add yout library automatically
    – hrskrs
    Feb 3 '15 at 9:59
  • Adding to build.gradle(Module:app), giving me an error that Failed to find: com.loopj.android:android-async-http:1.4.5 why it is not able to download directly, i have also set the proxy. I downloaded the jar file, and tried manually but as File Repository ..is it the correct way. Feb 3 '15 at 10:39
  • for simplicity use Project Structure go to Modules and choose your project. There you will see a green cross sign. Clicking that will open New Module window. There you choose to import your library.If you have .jar file then below choose import .JAR or .AAR package. Otherwise copy your jar to libs folder and on your Module:app add these dependencies: dependencies { compile fileTree(dir: 'libs', include: ['*.jar']) compile files('libs/your_jar_file.jar') }
    – hrskrs
    Feb 3 '15 at 11:38
  • This is a good reading developer.android.com/studio/build/index.html
    – onmyway133
    Jun 26 '17 at 9:46
53

It's a bit confusing because Android Studio by default shows both build.gradle files right next to each other (when using the Android view).

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If you switch to the Project view you can see the actual structure and where the different build.gradle files are located.

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The build.gradle (Project: MyApplication) file is in the root folder of the project and its configuration settings apply to every module in the project. A module is an isolated piece of the bigger project. In a multi-module project, these modules have their own jobs but work together to form the whole project. Most Android projects only have one module, the app module.

The build.gradle (Module: app) file here is in the app folder. Its build settings apply only to the app module. If there were another module, then that module would have its own build.gradle file, too. As an example, I made a library project with three modules: a library module, a demo app module, and another app module that I plan to use for testing. Each of them have their own build.gradle files that I can tweak.

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In a basic project, almost everything you need to edit will be in the app module's build.gradle file. You can remember it like this:

You're making an app, so go to the build.gradle (Module: app) file.

Further reading

2
  • This answer it much better as it explains what are Projects and Modules.
    – t3chb0t
    Oct 18 '20 at 9:01
  • Very well written! Jul 29 at 20:29
51

build.gradle (Project:My-app)

Top-level build file where you can add configuration options common to all sub-projects/modules.

Each project contains a top-level Gradle file. It usually contains common configurations for all modules. Whatever is included in this top-level Gradle gile, it will affect all modules.

Example:

// Top-level build file where you can add configuration options common to all sub-projects/modules.

buildscript {
    repositories {
        jcenter()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:2.0.0-alpha3'

        //Maven plugin
        classpath 'com.github.dcendents:android-maven-gradle-plugin:1.3'

        // NOTE: Do not place your application dependencies here; they belong
        // in the individual module build.gradle files
    }
}

allprojects {
    repositories {
        jcenter()
        maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
    }
}

task clean(type: Delete) {
    delete rootProject.buildDir
}

build.gradle (Module:app)

Build file of your specific module (where you add your dependencies, signing configurations, build types, flavors, etc.)

All modules have a specific Gradle file. Whatever is included in this gradle file, it will only affect the module that is included on.

Example:

apply plugin: 'com.android.application'

android {
    compileSdkVersion 23
    buildToolsVersion "23.0.2"

    defaultConfig {
        applicationId "com.hrskrs.gesturefun"
        minSdkVersion 10
        targetSdkVersion 23
        versionCode 1
        versionName "1.0"
    }
    buildTypes {
        release {
            zipAlignEnabled true
            minifyEnabled false
            proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'
        }
        debug {
            debuggable true
            zipAlignEnabled true
            minifyEnabled false
            proguardFiles getDefaultProguardFile('proguard-android.txt'), 'proguard-rules.pro'
        }
    }
}

dependencies {
    compile fileTree(dir: 'libs', include: ['*.jar'])
    compile project(':gesture-fun')
    testCompile 'junit:junit:4.12'
    compile 'com.android.support:appcompat-v7:23.1.1'
    compile 'com.android.support:design:23.1.1'
    compile 'com.jakewharton:butterknife:7.0.1'
}
0
1

About the relation of the two gradle files, hrskrs made a very clear explanation,and I will make some supplement about it.

If your project only has one Module (such as app), the advantage of the top build.gradle (Project:My-app) not show very clear. Because you can configure everything in build.gradle (Module:app) about the Module, and only modify one file when upgrading in the following days.

But if your project has five modules, and it happened that they have a same dependence A, if you don’t use the top build.gradle (Project: My-app) you need to maintain five files in the following days.

By the way, the build.gradle (Module:app) can overwrite the build.gradle (Project:My-app).

This design can improve the maintainability of the app.

1
  • What do you mean by 1) "not show very clear" (seems incomprehensible) and 2) "in the following days" (why would time matter? )? Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jul 29 at 20:34
0

[Project vs Module]

Projects' build.gradle file is used for common/shared logic. For example, you can define repositories here (Maven, Google, JCenter, and custom) or specify ext {} with shared variables or classpath[About].

Module's build.gradle is used for the current module, like dependencies, minSdkVersion, targetSdkVersion, compileSdkVersion[About], ProGuard settings[About]. Usually as a developer you should take care of this file.

1
  • Can you be specific than "Maven" and "Google"? For example, isn't the former "Maven Central" (not a rhetorical question)? Jul 29 at 21:01

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