109

This question already has an answer here:

I want to write a Unix shell script that will do various logic if there is a string inside of another string. For example, if I am in a certain folder, branch off. Could someone please tell me how to accomplish this? If possible I would like to make this not shell specific (i.e. not bash only) but if there's no other way I can make do with that.

#!/usr/bin/env sh

if [ "$PWD" contains "String1" ]
then
    echo "String1 present"
elif [ "$PWD" contains "String2" ]
then
    echo "String2 present"
else
    echo "Else"
fi

marked as duplicate by jww, fedorqui unix Jun 11 '18 at 9:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    I realize this is old, but here are a few things to note for future visitors: (1) It's usually good practice to reserve SNAKE_CASE variable names for environment and shell internal variables. (2) Setting CURRENT_DIR is redundant; you can just use $PWD. – nyuszika7h Nov 6 '14 at 22:03
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of String contains a substring in Bash. – jww Jun 11 '18 at 0:13
  • 6
    Not a duplicate; the other question is about Bash, while this one is about sh. – Reid Aug 14 '18 at 21:44

11 Answers 11

137

Here's yet another solution. This uses POSIX substring parameter expansion, so it works in bash, dash, ksh...

test "${string#*$word}" != "$string" && echo "$word found in $string"

Edit: That's a great idea, C. Ross. Here's a functionalized version with some examples:

# contains(string, substring)
#
# Returns 0 if the specified string contains the specified substring,
# otherwise returns 1.
contains() {
    string="$1"
    substring="$2"
    if test "${string#*$substring}" != "$string"
    then
        return 0    # $substring is in $string
    else
        return 1    # $substring is not in $string
    fi
}

contains "abcd" "e" || echo "abcd does not contain e"
contains "abcd" "ab" && echo "abcd contains ab"
contains "abcd" "bc" && echo "abcd contains bc"
contains "abcd" "cd" && echo "abcd contains cd"
contains "abcd" "abcd" && echo "abcd contains abcd"
contains "" "" && echo "empty string contains empty string"
contains "a" "" && echo "a contains empty string"
contains "" "a" || echo "empty string does not contain a"
contains "abcd efgh" "cd ef" && echo "abcd efgh contains cd ef"
contains "abcd efgh" " " && echo "abcd efgh contains a space"
  • 2
    clever, works with [[ ]] as well. – Wyrmwood Feb 24 '16 at 1:42
  • Is here a way to make it work case insensitively? – CMCDragonkai Mar 23 '16 at 13:09
  • 3
    This doesn't work for me if the substring contains backslashes. As usual, substring="$( printf '%q' "$2" )" saves the day. – Egor Tensin Aug 10 '16 at 11:22
  • 1
    What about using wildcards? [[ $haystack == *"My needle"* ]] – Pablo Bianchi Oct 5 '17 at 21:02
  • 1
    This does not work with special characters like []. See my answer stackoverflow.com/a/54490453/712666. – Alex.Designworks Feb 2 at 6:00
68

Pure POSIX shell:

#!/bin/sh
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

case "$CURRENT_DIR" in
  *String1*) echo "String1 present" ;;
  *String2*) echo "String2 present" ;;
  *)         echo "else" ;;
esac

Extended shells like ksh or bash have fancy matching mechanisms, but the old-style case is surprisingly powerful.

36

Sadly, I am not aware of a way to do this in sh. However, using bash (starting in version 3.0.0, which is probably what you have), you can use the =~ operator like this:

#!/bin/bash
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

if [[ "$CURRENT_DIR" =~ "String1" ]]
then
 echo "String1 present"
elif [[ "$CURRENT_DIR" =~ "String2" ]]
then
 echo "String2 present"
else
 echo "Else"
fi

As an added bonus (and/or a warning, if your strings have any funny characters in them), =~ accepts regexes as the right operand if you leave out the quotes.

  • 2
    Don't quote the regex, or it will not work in general. For example, try [[ test =~ "test.*" ]] vs. [[ test =~ test.* ]]. – l0b0 Jan 11 '12 at 8:01
  • 1
    Well, it will work just fine if you're testing for a substring, as in the original question, but it won't treat the right operand as a regex. I'll update my answer to make that more clear. – John Hyland Jun 25 '13 at 0:21
  • This is Bash, not POSIX sh as the question asks. – Reid Sep 27 '18 at 20:43
23
#!/usr/bin/env sh

# Searches a subset string in a string:
# 1st arg:reference string
# 2nd arg:subset string to be matched

if echo "$1" | grep -q "$2"
then
    echo "$2 is in $1"
else 
    echo "$2 is not in $1"
fi
  • 1
    Change grep -q "$2" to grep -q "$2" > /dev/null to avoid undesired output. – Victor Sergienko Jun 16 '17 at 1:49
  • grep -q is already quiet, that's what the -q is for. – Teh JoE Aug 16 '18 at 15:49
14
case $(pwd) in
  *path) echo "ends with path";;
  path*) echo "starts with path";;
  *path*) echo "contains path";;
  *) echo "this is the default";;
esac
14

Here is a link to various solutions of your issue.

This is my favorite as it makes the most human readable sense:

The Star Wildcard Method

if [[ "$string" == *"$substring"* ]]; then
    return 1
fi
return 0
  • Very nice, and very readable. – kiwicomb123 Nov 4 '17 at 4:43
  • On sh I received "unknown operand" with this. Works with Bash though. – halfer Apr 22 '18 at 16:14
  • Only this worked for me on MacOS shell – manoj May 24 '18 at 7:28
  • 1
    [[ is not POSIX – Ian Oct 25 '18 at 15:56
6

There's bash regexps. Or there's 'expr':

 if expr "$link" : '/.*' > /dev/null; then
    PRG="$link"
  else
    PRG=`dirname "$PRG"`/"$link"
  fi
2

See the manpage for the 'test' program. If you're just testing for the existence of a directory you would normally do something like so:

if test -d "String1"; then
  echo "String1 present"
end

If you're actually trying to match a string you can use bash expansion rules & wildcards as well:

if test -d "String*"; then
  echo "A directory starting with 'String' is present"
end

If you need to do something more complex you'll need to use another program like expr.

  • 1
    There seems to be a spurious double quote (") in your second example. – Alexis Wilke Aug 22 '16 at 17:39
2

In special cases where you want to find whether a word is contained in a long text, you can iterate through the long text with a loop.

found=F
query_word=this
long_string="many many words in this text"
for w in $long_string; do
    if [ "$w" = "$query_word" ]; then
          found=T
          break
    fi
done

This is pure Bourne shell.

1
test $(echo "stringcontain" "ingcon" |awk '{ print index($1, $2) }') -gt 0 && echo "String 1 contain string 2"

--> output: String 1 contain string 2

1

If you want a ksh only method that is as fast as "test", you can do something like:

contains() # haystack needle
{
    haystack=${1/$2/}
    if [ ${#haystack} -ne ${#1} ] ; then
        return 1
    fi
    return 0
}

It works by deleting the needle in the haystack and then comparing the string length of old and new haystacks.

  • 1
    Wouldn't it be possible to return the result of test? As in return [ ${#haystack} -eq ${#1} ]? – Alexis Wilke Aug 22 '16 at 18:05

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