165

I want to write a Unix shell script that will do various logic if there is a string inside of another string. For example, if I am in a certain folder, branch off. Could someone please tell me how to accomplish this? If possible I would like to make this not shell specific (i.e. not bash only) but if there's no other way I can make do with that.

#!/usr/bin/env sh

if [ "$PWD" contains "String1" ]
then
    echo "String1 present"
elif [ "$PWD" contains "String2" ]
then
    echo "String2 present"
else
    echo "Else"
fi
1
  • 3
    I realize this is old, but here are a few things to note for future visitors: (1) It's usually good practice to reserve SNAKE_CASE variable names for environment and shell internal variables. (2) Setting CURRENT_DIR is redundant; you can just use $PWD.
    – nyuszika7h
    Nov 6, 2014 at 22:03

12 Answers 12

205

Here's yet another solution. This uses POSIX substring parameter expansion, so it works in Bash, Dash, KornShell (ksh), Z shell (zsh), etc.

test "${string#*$word}" != "$string" && echo "$word found in $string"

A functionalized version with some examples:

# contains(string, substring)
#
# Returns 0 if the specified string contains the specified substring,
# otherwise returns 1.
contains() {
    string="$1"
    substring="$2"
    if test "${string#*$substring}" != "$string"
    then
        return 0    # $substring is in $string
    else
        return 1    # $substring is not in $string
    fi
}

contains "abcd" "e" || echo "abcd does not contain e"
contains "abcd" "ab" && echo "abcd contains ab"
contains "abcd" "bc" && echo "abcd contains bc"
contains "abcd" "cd" && echo "abcd contains cd"
contains "abcd" "abcd" && echo "abcd contains abcd"
contains "" "" && echo "empty string contains empty string"
contains "a" "" && echo "a contains empty string"
contains "" "a" || echo "empty string does not contain a"
contains "abcd efgh" "cd ef" && echo "abcd efgh contains cd ef"
contains "abcd efgh" " " && echo "abcd efgh contains a space"
5
  • 3
    This doesn't work for me if the substring contains backslashes. As usual, substring="$( printf '%q' "$2" )" saves the day. Aug 10, 2016 at 11:22
  • this matches wrong substrinsg too. string = "aplha beta betaone" substring="beta" . it matches both betaone an dbeta, whihc i think is wrong.
    – rajeev
    Aug 30, 2017 at 21:04
  • 1
    What about using wildcards? [[ $haystack == *"My needle"* ]] Oct 5, 2017 at 21:02
  • 9
    What's wrong is that double-brackets aren't POSIX, which was the premise of the question, @Pablo. Sep 4, 2018 at 22:38
  • 2
    This does not work with special characters like []. See my answer stackoverflow.com/a/54490453/712666. Feb 2, 2019 at 6:00
107

Pure POSIX shell:

#!/bin/sh
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

case "$CURRENT_DIR" in
  *String1*) echo "String1 present" ;;
  *String2*) echo "String2 present" ;;
  *)         echo "else" ;;
esac

Extended shells like ksh or bash have fancy matching mechanisms, but the old-style case is surprisingly powerful.

43
#!/usr/bin/env sh

# Searches a subset string in a string:
# 1st arg:reference string
# 2nd arg:subset string to be matched

if echo "$1" | grep -q "$2"
then
    echo "$2 is in $1"
else 
    echo "$2 is not in $1"
fi
6
  • 3
    Change grep -q "$2" to grep -q "$2" > /dev/null to avoid undesired output. Jun 16, 2017 at 1:49
  • 2
    Change grep -q "$2" to grep -q "$2" 2>/dev/null to avoid undesired output.
    – ulidtko
    Oct 15, 2020 at 11:53
  • grep is not POSIX.
    – Adel M.
    Nov 20, 2021 at 5:11
  • 1
    @AdelM. Are you sure? unix.com/man-page/posix/1p/grep Dec 22, 2021 at 13:14
  • 1
    @TrippKinetics. I was mistaken. You are right.
    – Adel M.
    Dec 22, 2021 at 19:43
38

Sadly, I am not aware of a way to do this in sh. However, using bash (starting in version 3.0.0, which is probably what you have), you can use the =~ operator like this:

#!/bin/bash
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

if [[ "$CURRENT_DIR" =~ "String1" ]]
then
 echo "String1 present"
elif [[ "$CURRENT_DIR" =~ "String2" ]]
then
 echo "String2 present"
else
 echo "Else"
fi

As an added bonus (and/or a warning, if your strings have any funny characters in them), =~ accepts regexes as the right operand if you leave out the quotes.

3
  • 3
    Don't quote the regex, or it will not work in general. For example, try [[ test =~ "test.*" ]] vs. [[ test =~ test.* ]].
    – l0b0
    Jan 11, 2012 at 8:01
  • 1
    Well, it will work just fine if you're testing for a substring, as in the original question, but it won't treat the right operand as a regex. I'll update my answer to make that more clear. Jun 25, 2013 at 0:21
  • 7
    This is Bash, not POSIX sh as the question asks.
    – Reid
    Sep 27, 2018 at 20:43
17
case $(pwd) in
  *path) echo "ends with path";;
  path*) echo "starts with path";;
  *path*) echo "contains path";;
  *) echo "this is the default";;
esac
11

Here is a link to various solutions of your issue.

This is my favorite as it makes the most human readable sense:

The Star Wildcard Method

if [[ "$string" == *"$substring"* ]]; then
    return 1
fi
return 0
3
  • On sh I received "unknown operand" with this. Works with Bash though.
    – halfer
    Apr 22, 2018 at 16:14
  • 27
    [[ is not POSIX
    – Ian
    Oct 25, 2018 at 15:56
  • This works in the IBM z/OS USS POSIX shell. Jun 22, 2021 at 21:32
5

There's Bash regular expressions. Or there's 'expr':

 if expr "$link" : '/.*' > /dev/null; then
    PRG="$link"
  else
    PRG=`dirname "$PRG"`/"$link"
  fi
3

If you want a ksh only method that is as fast as "test", you can do something like:

contains() # haystack needle
{
    haystack=${1/$2/}
    if [ ${#haystack} -ne ${#1} ] ; then
        return 1
    fi
    return 0
}

It works by deleting the needle in the haystack and then comparing the string length of old and new haystacks.

2
  • 1
    Wouldn't it be possible to return the result of test? As in return [ ${#haystack} -eq ${#1} ]? Aug 22, 2016 at 18:05
  • Yes, that is correct. I will leave it like this as its easier to understand for laymen. If you use in your code, use @AlexisWilke method.
    – JoeOfTex
    Jun 19, 2019 at 21:29
2
test $(echo "stringcontain" "ingcon" |awk '{ print index($1, $2) }') -gt 0 && echo "String 1 contain string 2"

--> output: String 1 contain string 2

2

See the manpage for the 'test' program. If you're just testing for the existence of a directory you would normally do something like so:

if test -d "String1"; then
  echo "String1 present"
end

If you're actually trying to match a string you can use bash expansion rules & wildcards as well:

if test -d "String*"; then
  echo "A directory starting with 'String' is present"
end

If you need to do something more complex you'll need to use another program like expr.

1
  • 1
    There seems to be a spurious double quote (") in your second example. Aug 22, 2016 at 17:39
2

In special cases where you want to find whether a word is contained in a long text, you can iterate through the long text with a loop.

found=F
query_word=this
long_string="many many words in this text"
for w in $long_string; do
    if [ "$w" = "$query_word" ]; then
          found=T
          break
    fi
done

This is pure Bourne shell.

0

This is another possible POSIX solution based on this answer, but making it work with special characters, like []*. This is achieved surrounding the substring variable with double quotes.

This is an alternative implementation of this other answer on another thread using only shell builtins. If string is empty the last test would give a false positive, hence we need to test whether substring is empty as well in that case.

#!/bin/sh
# contains(string, substring)
#
# Returns 0 if the specified string contains the specified substring,
# otherwise returns 1.
contains() {
    string="$1"
    substring="$2"
    test -n "$string" || test -z "$substring" && test -z "${string##*"$substring"*}"
}

Or one-liner:

contains() { test -n "$1" || test -z "$2" && test -z "${1##*"$2"*}"; }

Nevertheless, a solution with case like this other answer looks simpler and less error prone.

#!/bin/sh
contains() {
    string="$1"
    substring="$2"
    case "$string" in
        *"$substring"*) true ;;
        *) false ;;
    esac
}

Or one-liner:

contains() { case "$1" in *"$2"*) true ;; *) false ;; esac }

For the tests:

contains "abcd" "e" || echo "abcd does not contain e"
contains "abcd" "ab" && echo "abcd contains ab"
contains "abcd" "bc" && echo "abcd contains bc"
contains "abcd" "cd" && echo "abcd contains cd"
contains "abcd" "abcd" && echo "abcd contains abcd"
contains "" "" && echo "empty string contains empty string"
contains "a" "" && echo "a contains empty string"
contains "" "a" || echo "empty string does not contain a"
contains "abcd efgh" "cd ef" && echo "abcd efgh contains cd ef"
contains "abcd efgh" " " && echo "abcd efgh contains a space"

contains "abcd [efg] hij" "[efg]" && echo "abcd [efg] hij contains [efg]"
contains "abcd [efg] hij" "[effg]" || echo "abcd [efg] hij does not contain [effg]"

contains "abcd *efg* hij" "*efg*" && echo "abcd *efg* hij contains *efg*"
contains "abcd *efg* hij" "d *efg* h" && echo "abcd *efg* hij contains d *efg* h"
contains "abcd *efg* hij" "*effg*" || echo "abcd *efg* hij does not contain *effg*"

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