2

The initial situation is like this:

initial situation

Now, the tree is potentially huge (I have a tree with 22 million nodes for instance). What happens here is that I use a jooq/h2 backend to store all the nodes and execute queries to find children.

Which means, in the image above, the node is marked as expandable but its children are not populated yet. It is done on demand. And after expansion I get this:

after expansion

The problem I have is that of course, expansion can take time; and what I'd like to do is to add a visual clue to the graphic of the TreeItem to show that it is loading...

And I can't do it.


OK, first of all, a general view of the architecture:

  • it is, in short, "MVP with passive views";
  • what JavaFX calls a "controller", which is in my code implemented by *Display classes, are the passive views, whose only role is to capture UI events and forward them to the *Presenter; such classes are "GUI implementation specific";
  • the *Presenter reacts to those events by ordering the *View class to update the *Display;
  • when tasks require a certain amount of time to complete, too much for the GUI to remain interactive, a BackgroundTaskRunner is used by the *Presenter to:

    1. instruct the *View to modify the UI to acknowledge the task (on the GUI thread);
    2. perform the task (on a background thread);
    3. instruct the *View to modify the UI when the task completes (on the GUI thread);
    4. if the task fails, instruct the *View to modify the UI accordingly (on the GUI thread).

With JavaFX:

  • the UI is a *Display class; it is defined by, and loaded from, an FXML file;
  • the (implementation of) the *View class has visibility over all GUI elements defined in the *Display class.

The *View class is in fact an interface; this allows me to be able to make a webapp version of this program (planned).


Now, the context of this code...

The *Presenter, *View and *Display all relate to the "Parse tree" tab visible in the above images.

Given the architecture above, the problem lies with the implementation of the *View class, and with the *Display class.

The *Display class has an init() method which initializes all relevant JavaFX components, if need be. In this case, the TreeView, called parseTree, is initialized as such:

@Override
public void init()
{
    parseTree.setCellFactory(param -> new ParseTreeNodeCell(this));
}

ParseTreeNodeCell is defined as such:

public final class ParseTreeNodeCell
    extends TreeCell<ParseTreeNode>
{
    // FAILED attempt at showing a progress indicator...
    private final ProgressIndicator indicator = new ProgressIndicator();
    private final Text text = new Text();
    private final HBox hBox = new HBox(text, indicator);

    public ParseTreeNodeCell(final TreeTabDisplay display)
    {
        // FIXME: not sure about the following line...
        indicator.setMaxHeight(heightProperty().doubleValue());
        // ... But this I want: by default, not visible
        indicator.setVisible(false);

        // The whole tree is readonly
        setEditable(false);

        // Some non relevant code snipped away
    }

    public void showIndicator()
    {
        indicator.setVisible(true);
    }

    public void hideIndicator()
    {
        indicator.setVisible(false);
    }

    // What to do when a TreeItem is actually attached...
    @Override
    protected void updateItem(final ParseTreeNode item, final boolean empty)
    {
        super.updateItem(item, empty);
        if (empty) {
            setGraphic(null);
            return;
        }
        final String msg = String.format("%s (%s)",
            item.getRuleInfo().getName(),
            item.isSuccess() ? "SUCCESS" : "FAILURE");
        text.setText(msg);
        setGraphic(hBox);
        // HACK. PUKE. UGLY.
        ((ParseTreeItem) getTreeItem()).setCell(this);
    }
}

ParseTreeItem is this:

public final class ParseTreeItem
    extends TreeItem<ParseTreeNode>
{
    private final boolean leaf;

    private ParseTreeNodeCell cell;

    public ParseTreeItem(final TreeTabDisplay display,
        final ParseTreeNode value)
    {
        super(value);
        leaf = !value.hasChildren();

        // If the item is expanded, we load children.
        // If it is collapsed, we unload them.
        expandedProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<Boolean>()
        {
            @Override
            public void changed(
                final ObservableValue<? extends Boolean> observable,
                final Boolean oldValue, final Boolean newValue)
            {
                if (oldValue == newValue)
                    return;
                if (!newValue) {
                    getChildren().clear();
                    return;
                }
                display.needChildren(ParseTreeItem.this);
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isLeaf()
    {
        return leaf;
    }

    public void setCell(final ParseTreeNodeCell cell)
    {
        this.cell = cell;
    }

    public void showIndicator()
    {
        cell.showIndicator();
    }

    public void hideIndicator()
    {
        cell.hideIndicator();
    }
}

Now, always in the *Display class, the needChildren() method is defined as such:

ParseTreeItem currentItem;

// ...

public void needChildren(final ParseTreeItem parseTreeItem)
{
    // Keep a reference to the current item so that the *View can act on it
    currentItem = parseTreeItem;
    presenter.needChildren(currentItem.getValue());
}

The presenter does this:

public void needChildren(final ParseTreeNode value)
{
    taskRunner.computeOrFail(
        view::waitForChildren, () -> {
            // FOR TESTING
            TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1L);
            return getNodeChildren(value.getId());
        },
        view::setTreeChildren,
        throwable -> mainView.showError("Tree expand error",
            "Unable to extend parse tree node", throwable)
    );
}

(see here; for the taskRunner)

The corresponding methods in the view member above (JavaFX implementation) do this:

@Override
public void waitForChildren()
{
    // Supposedly shows the indicator in the TreeItemGraphic...
    // Except that it does not.
    display.currentItem.showIndicator();
}

@Override
public void setTreeChildren(final List<ParseTreeNode> children)
{
    final List<ParseTreeItem> items = children.stream()
        .map(node -> new ParseTreeItem(display, node))
        .collect(Collectors.toList());
    // This works fine
    display.currentItem.getChildren().setAll(items);
    // But this does not...
    display.currentItem.hideIndicator();
}

Even though I define methods on the TreeItem to show the progress indicator, it doesn't show at all :/

In fact, my problem is twofold, and all related to ParseTreeItem:

  • in ParseTreeNodeCell, I need to cast to ParseTreeItem to set the cell;
  • even when I do this, well, it doesn't work at all, I can't see the indicator show up at all.

Not only that, but for some reason I need to check (in ParseTreeNodeCell) that I actually have a value, since otherwise I get an NPE. And I can't find a way to get the matching cell from a tree item...

So, all in all, I do many things badly and none correctly.

How do I manage to get the graphic of a TreeItem change in that situation, as long as the loading is still in progress?


EDIT

Solution found, inspited by the code written by @James_D; see my own answer for how I really did it.

  • Woof, that is a serious amount of code and waay beyond an MCVE ;-) If you do not mind, I can write a general answer but you will have to adapt it to your needs. – eckig Feb 3 '15 at 17:37
  • @eckig Didn't mean to jump in with the same idea, but I was already working on an example when you commented... – James_D Feb 3 '15 at 18:03
  • @eckig well, I admit that I didn't fully explain the mechanism; I'll edit my question accordingly... – fge Feb 3 '15 at 18:11
  • @eckig question edited; meh, it's an even longer read than it originally was... Sorry... – fge Feb 3 '15 at 18:45
4

First, I admit I didn't go through all your code carefully.

I think the approach to have here is to use a TreeItem subclass that exposes an observable property describing the "loaded status" of the children. Then have the tree cells observe the loaded status of the current tree item, and display a progress bar accordingly.

Here's a SSCCE:

(Updated: apparently if I only observe the treeItem and not the item, the tree fails to remove the disclosure graphics from empty cells... Fixed by using the itemProperty to manage the text.)

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.beans.property.ObjectProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleObjectProperty;
import javafx.beans.value.ChangeListener;
import javafx.collections.ObservableList;
import javafx.concurrent.Task;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.control.ProgressBar;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeCell;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeItem;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeView;
import javafx.scene.layout.BorderPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;



public class LazyTreeCellLoadingExample extends Application {

    // Executor for background tasks:        
    private static final ExecutorService exec = Executors.newCachedThreadPool(r -> {
        Thread t = new Thread(r);
        t.setDaemon(true);
        return t ;
    });

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        TreeView<Long> tree = new TreeView<>();
        tree.setRoot(new LazyTreeItem(1L));

        // cell factory that displays progress bar when item is loading children:
        tree.setCellFactory(tv ->  {

            // the cell:
            TreeCell<Long> cell = new TreeCell<>();

            // progress bar to display when needed:
            ProgressBar progressBar = new ProgressBar();

            // listener to observe *current* tree item's child loading status:
            ChangeListener<LazyTreeItem.ChildrenLoadedStatus> listener = (obs, oldStatus, newStatus) -> {
                if (newStatus == LazyTreeItem.ChildrenLoadedStatus.LOADING) {
                    cell.setGraphic(progressBar);
                } else {
                    cell.setGraphic(null);
                }
            };

            // listener for tree item property
            // ensures that listener above is attached to current tree item:
            cell.treeItemProperty().addListener((obs, oldItem, newItem) -> {

                // if we were displaying an item, (and no longer are...),
                // stop observing its child loading status:
                if (oldItem != null) {
                    ((LazyTreeItem) oldItem).childrenLoadedStatusProperty().removeListener(listener);
                }

                // if there is a new item the cell is displaying:
                if (newItem != null) {

                    // update graphic to display progress bar if needed:
                    LazyTreeItem lazyTreeItem = (LazyTreeItem) newItem;
                    if (lazyTreeItem.getChildrenLoadedStatus() == LazyTreeItem.ChildrenLoadedStatus.LOADING) {
                        cell.setGraphic(progressBar);
                    } else {
                        cell.setGraphic(null);
                    }

                    // observe loaded status of current item in case it changes 
                    // while we are still displaying this item:
                    lazyTreeItem.childrenLoadedStatusProperty().addListener(listener);
                } 
            });

            // change text if item changes:
            cell.itemProperty().addListener((obs, oldItem, newItem) -> {
                if (newItem == null) {
                    cell.setText(null);
                    cell.setGraphic(null);
                } else {
                    cell.setText(newItem.toString());
                }
            });

            return cell ;
        });

        Button debugButton = new Button("Debug");
        debugButton.setOnAction(evt -> {
            dumpData(tree.getRoot(), 0);
        });

        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(new BorderPane(tree, null, null, debugButton, null), 400, 250));
        primaryStage.show();
    }

    private void dumpData(TreeItem<Long> node, int depth) {
        for (int i=0; i<depth; i++) System.out.print(" ");
        System.out.println(node.getValue());
        for (TreeItem<Long> child : node.getChildren()) dumpData(child, depth+1);
    }

    // TreeItem subclass that lazily loads children in background
    // Exposes an observable property specifying current load status of children
    public static class LazyTreeItem extends TreeItem<Long> {

        // possible load statuses:
        enum ChildrenLoadedStatus { NOT_LOADED, LOADING, LOADED }

        // observable property for current load status:
        private final ObjectProperty<ChildrenLoadedStatus> childrenLoadedStatus = new SimpleObjectProperty<>(ChildrenLoadedStatus.NOT_LOADED);

        public LazyTreeItem(Long value) {
            super(value);
        }

        // getChildren() method loads children lazily:
        @Override
        public ObservableList<TreeItem<Long>> getChildren() {
            if (getChildrenLoadedStatus() == ChildrenLoadedStatus.NOT_LOADED) {
                lazilyLoadChildren();
            }
            return super.getChildren() ;
        }

        // load child nodes in background, updating status accordingly:
        private void lazilyLoadChildren() {

            // change current status to "loading":
            setChildrenLoadedStatus(ChildrenLoadedStatus.LOADING);
            long value = getValue();

            // background task to load children:
            Task<List<LazyTreeItem>> loadTask = new Task<List<LazyTreeItem>>() {

                @Override
                protected List<LazyTreeItem> call() throws Exception {
                    List<LazyTreeItem> children = new ArrayList<>();
                    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
                        children.add(new LazyTreeItem(10*value + i));
                    }

                    // for testing (loading is so lazy it falls asleep)
                    Thread.sleep(3000);
                    return children;
                }

            };

            // when loading is complete:
            // 1. set actual child nodes to loaded nodes
            // 2. update status to "loaded"
            loadTask.setOnSucceeded(event -> {
                super.getChildren().setAll(loadTask.getValue());
                setChildrenLoadedStatus(ChildrenLoadedStatus.LOADED);
            });

            // execute task in backgroun
            exec.submit(loadTask);
        }

        // is leaf is true only if we *know* there are no children
        // i.e. we've done the loading and still found nothing
        @Override
        public boolean isLeaf() {
            return getChildrenLoadedStatus() == ChildrenLoadedStatus.LOADED && super.getChildren().size()==0 ;
        }

        // normal property accessor methods:

        public final ObjectProperty<ChildrenLoadedStatus> childrenLoadedStatusProperty() {
            return this.childrenLoadedStatus;
        }

        public final LazyTreeCellLoadingExample.LazyTreeItem.ChildrenLoadedStatus getChildrenLoadedStatus() {
            return this.childrenLoadedStatusProperty().get();
        }

        public final void setChildrenLoadedStatus(
                final LazyTreeCellLoadingExample.LazyTreeItem.ChildrenLoadedStatus childrenLoadedStatus) {
            this.childrenLoadedStatusProperty().set(childrenLoadedStatus);
        }


    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }
}

Update

After quite a bit of discussion, I came up with a second solution. This is basically similar to the previous solution in the way it manages the progress bar: there is a TreeItem subclass that exposes a BooleanProperty which is true if and only if the item is currently loading its children. The TreeCell observes this property on the TreeItem it is currently displaying - taking care to register a listener with the treeItemProperty so that the listener for the loadingProperty is always registered with the current item.

The difference is in the way the children are loaded, and - in the case of this solution - unloaded. In the previous solution, child nodes were loaded when first requested, and then retained. In this solution, child nodes are loaded when the node is expanded, and then removed when the node is collapsed. This is handled with a simple listener on the expandedProperty.

The first solution behaves slightly more as expected from a user perspective, in that if you collapse a node which is the head of a subtree, and then expand it again, the expanded state of the subtree is retained. In the second solution, collapsing a node has the effect of collapsing all descendent nodes (because they are actually removed).

The second solution is more robust for memory usage. This is actually unlikely to be an issue outside of some extreme use cases. TreeItem objects are purely model - i.e. they store only data, no UI. Thus they probably use no more than a few hundred bytes of memory each. In order to consume significant amounts of memory, the user would have to navigate through hundreds of thousands of nodes, which would probably take days. (That said, I'm typing this into Google Chrome, which I think I've had running for over a month with at least 8-10 hours' active use per day, so such use cases are certainly not impossible.)

Here's the second solution. One note: I don't make any effort to handle a quick expand and collapse of a node (collapsing while the data are still loading). The TreeItem subclass should really keep track of any current Task (or use a Service) and call cancel() if a task is running and the user collapses the node. I didn't want to confuse the logic more than necessary to demonstrate the basic idea.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.beans.property.BooleanProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleBooleanProperty;
import javafx.beans.value.ChangeListener;
import javafx.beans.value.ObservableValue;
import javafx.concurrent.Task;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.ProgressBar;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeCell;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeItem;
import javafx.scene.control.TreeView;
import javafx.scene.layout.BorderPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class LazyTreeCellLoadingExample2 extends Application {

    private static final ExecutorService EXEC = Executors.newCachedThreadPool((Runnable r) -> {
        Thread t = new Thread(r);
        t.setDaemon(true);
        return t ;
    });

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        TreeView<Integer> tree = new TreeView<>();
        tree.setRoot(new LazyTreeItem(1));

        tree.setCellFactory(tv -> createTreeCell()) ;

        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(new BorderPane(tree), 450, 600));
        primaryStage.show();
    }

    private TreeCell<Integer> createTreeCell() {

        ProgressBar progressBar = new ProgressBar();
        TreeCell<Integer> cell = new TreeCell<>();

        ChangeListener<Boolean> loadingChangeListener = 
                (ObservableValue<? extends Boolean> obs, Boolean wasLoading, Boolean isNowLoading) -> {
                   if (isNowLoading) {
                       cell.setGraphic(progressBar);
                   } else {
                       cell.setGraphic(null);
                   }
                };

        cell.treeItemProperty().addListener( 
                (ObservableValue<? extends TreeItem<Integer>> obs, 
                        TreeItem<Integer> oldItem, 
                        TreeItem<Integer> newItem) -> {

                if (oldItem != null) {
                    LazyTreeItem oldLazyTreeItem = (LazyTreeItem) oldItem ;
                    oldLazyTreeItem.loadingProperty().removeListener(loadingChangeListener);
                }

                if (newItem != null) {
                    LazyTreeItem newLazyTreeItem = (LazyTreeItem) newItem ;
                    newLazyTreeItem.loadingProperty().addListener(loadingChangeListener);

                    if (newLazyTreeItem.isLoading()) {
                        cell.setGraphic(progressBar);
                    } else {
                        cell.setGraphic(null);
                    }
                }
        });

        cell.itemProperty().addListener(
                (ObservableValue<? extends Integer> obs, Integer oldItem, Integer newItem) -> {
                   if (newItem == null) {
                       cell.setText(null);
                       cell.setGraphic(null);
                   } else {
                       cell.setText(newItem.toString());
                   }
                });

        return cell ;
    }

    public static class LazyTreeItem extends TreeItem<Integer> {

        private final BooleanProperty loading = new SimpleBooleanProperty(false);

        private boolean leaf = false ;

        public final BooleanProperty loadingProperty() {
            return this.loading;
        }

        public final boolean isLoading() {
            return this.loadingProperty().get();
        }

        public final void setLoading(final boolean loading) {
            this.loadingProperty().set(loading);
        }


        public LazyTreeItem(Integer value) {
            super(value);

            expandedProperty().addListener((ObservableValue<? extends Boolean>obs,  Boolean wasExpanded,  Boolean isNowExpanded) -> {
                if (isNowExpanded) {
                    loadChildrenLazily();
                } else {
                    clearChildren();
                }
            });
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isLeaf() {
            return leaf ;
        }

        private void loadChildrenLazily() {

            setLoading(true);

            int value = getValue();
            Task<List<TreeItem<Integer>>> loadTask = new Task<List<TreeItem<Integer>>>() {

                @Override
                protected List<TreeItem<Integer>> call() throws Exception {
                    List<TreeItem<Integer>> children = new ArrayList<>();
                    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
                        children.add(new LazyTreeItem(value * 10 + i));
                    }
                    Thread.sleep(3000);
                    return children ;
                }

            };

            loadTask.setOnSucceeded(event -> {
                List<TreeItem<Integer>> children = loadTask.getValue();
                leaf = children.size() == 0 ;
                getChildren().setAll(children);
                setLoading(false);
            });

            EXEC.submit(loadTask);
        }

        private void clearChildren() {
            getChildren().clear();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }
}

The "double listener" in for the cell is because we really need to observe a "property of a property". Specifically, the cell has a treeItem property, and the tree item has a loadingProperty. It's the loading property belonging to the current tree item that we're really interested in. Of course, there are two ways this can change: the tree item changes in the cell, or the loading property changes in the tree item. The EasyBind framework includes API specifically for observing "properties of properties". If you use EasyBind, you can replace the (30 or so lines of) code

ChangeListener<Boolean> loadingChangeListener = ... ;

cell.treeItemProperty().addListener(...);

with

    ObservableValue<Boolean> loading = EasyBind.select(cell.treeItemProperty())
    // ugly cast still here:
            .selectObject(treeItem -> ((LazyTreeItem)treeItem).loadingProperty());

    loading.addListener((obs, wasLoading, isNowLoading) -> {
        if (isNowLoading != null && isNowLoading.booleanValue()) {
            cell.setGraphic(progressBar);
        } else {
            cell.setGraphic(null);
        }
    });
  • Well, I had something similar in mind but was not ready.. you are faster ;-) – eckig Feb 3 '15 at 18:05
  • Hmm, so, the general idea here seems to be to add a listener to the treeItemProperty() which I didn't even know existed, huh? I'll try and adapt. In the meanwhile I'll edit my question with the general idea of the design. But as I suck at diagrams it will be a text explanation only, sorry! – fge Feb 3 '15 at 18:13
  • OK, I've spent the last few minutes editing my question and you spent them wirting code, so I'll look at your code carefully again ;) If the edited question can help you understand the design and provide further hints, I will of course welcome them :p – fge Feb 3 '15 at 18:44
  • 1
    Added a second solution... I included types in the lambdas in case that helps some; using inner classes would just make it way too verbose imho. – James_D Feb 4 '15 at 3:43
  • 1
    You can easily use your BackgroundTaskRunner in place of the javafx.concurrent.Task class, though, if you prefer. The cast cannot be avoided (at least not in any way you'd consider viable) as the use of TreeItem is hard-coded into the TreeView class. (It would have had to have been TreeView<S extends TreeItem<T>> or something, so that you could parametrize the type of TreeItem as well as the type of it's value. At some point I guess they have to keep it easy to do the simple stuff...). – James_D Feb 4 '15 at 12:57
0

Problem SOLVED!

Here is how I solved it...

The first thing that I learned with this question is that a TreeCell is in fact a "moving object": it moves from TreeItem to TreeItem; here, the TreeItem is a ParseTreeItem which has a dedicated property, loadingProperty(), and in the cell's treeItemProperty() I make use of this property to update the graphics.

As @James_D suggested in his code, I use EasyBind; the code is basically a ripoff of his, except for the fact that I don't use the cell's text but only a graphic, which is a HorizontalBox.

In addition I also have to listen to the cell's selectedProperty() since when it is selected, I need to update the info box and the text area:

public final class ParseTreeNodeCell
    extends TreeCell<ParseTreeNode>
{
    private final Text text = new Text();
    private final ProgressBar progressBar = new ProgressBar();
    private final HBox hBox = new HBox(text);

    public ParseTreeNodeCell(final TreeTabDisplay display)
    {
        setEditable(false);

        selectedProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<Boolean>()
        {
            @SuppressWarnings("AutoUnboxing")
            @Override
            public void changed(
                final ObservableValue<? extends Boolean> observable,
                final Boolean oldValue, final Boolean newValue)
            {
                if (!newValue)
                    return;
                final ParseTreeNode node = getItem();
                if (node != null)
                    display.parseTreeNodeShowEvent(node);
            }
        });

        final ObservableValue<Boolean> loading
            = EasyBind.select(treeItemProperty())
            .selectObject(item -> ((ParseTreeItem) item).loadingProperty());

        loading.addListener(new ChangeListener<Boolean>()
        {
            @Override
            public void changed(
                final ObservableValue<? extends Boolean> observable,
                final Boolean oldValue, final Boolean newValue)
            {
                final ObservableList<Node> children = hBox.getChildren();
                if (newValue == null || !newValue.booleanValue()) {
                    children.remove(progressBar);
                    return;
                }

                if (!children.contains(progressBar))
                    children.add(progressBar);
            }
        });

        itemProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<ParseTreeNode>()
        {
            @Override
            public void changed(
                final ObservableValue<? extends ParseTreeNode> observable,
                final ParseTreeNode oldValue, final ParseTreeNode newValue)
            {
                if (newValue == null) {
                    setGraphic(null);
                    return;
                }
                text.setText(String.format("%s (%s)",
                    newValue.getRuleInfo().getName(),
                    newValue.isSuccess() ? "SUCCESS" : "FAILURE"));
                setGraphic(hBox);
            }
        });
    }
}

Now, the code of ParseTreeItem which extends TreeItem<ParseTreeNode>, is as such:

public final class ParseTreeItem
    extends TreeItem<ParseTreeNode>
{
    private final BooleanProperty loadingProperty
        = new SimpleBooleanProperty(false);

    private final boolean leaf;

    public ParseTreeItem(final TreeTabDisplay display,
        final ParseTreeNode value)
    {
        super(value);
        leaf = !value.hasChildren();
        expandedProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<Boolean>()
        {
            @Override
            public void changed(
                final ObservableValue<? extends Boolean> observable,
                final Boolean oldValue, final Boolean newValue)
            {
                if (!newValue) {
                    getChildren().clear();
                    return;
                }
                display.needChildren(ParseTreeItem.this);
            }
        });
    }

    public BooleanProperty loadingProperty()
    {
        return loadingProperty;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isLeaf()
    {
        return leaf;
    }
}

Again, this is nearly a ripoff, except for the fact that I don't want the item to hold the logic to:

  • fetch the children,
  • updating its own loading property.

The "secret" is in display.needChildren(ParseTreeItem.this); this is what it does:

public void needChildren(final ParseTreeItem parseTreeItem)
{
    currentItem = parseTreeItem;
    presenter.needChildren(currentItem.getValue());
}

And, in turn, the code in presenter does:

public void needChildren(final ParseTreeNode value)
{
    taskRunner.computeOrFail(
        view::waitForChildren,
        () -> getNodeChildren(value.getId()),
        view::setTreeChildren,
        throwable -> mainView.showError("Tree expand error",
            "Unable to extend parse tree node", throwable)
    );
}

And is where the view comes in; it is the view which updates currentItem, since it has direct access to the display and its fields:

@Override
public void waitForChildren()
{
    display.currentItem.loadingProperty().setValue(true);
}

@Override
public void setTreeChildren(final List<ParseTreeNode> children)
{
    final List<ParseTreeItem> items = children.stream()
        .map(node -> new ParseTreeItem(display, node))
        .collect(Collectors.toList());
    display.currentItem.getChildren().setAll(items);
    display.currentItem.loadingProperty().setValue(false);
}

As you can see, when waitingForChildren() and setTreeChildren() update the loadingProperty(); and in turn the ParseTreeNodeCell will then update the graphics accordingly.

  • allow me a couple of comments, unrelated to your problem: a) the leafness is an illegal implementation as it violates the constraint assertEquals(isLeaf, leafProperty.get) - nothing much you can do about it, due to super not supporting semantic leafs b) normally, changelisteners aren't notified if oldValue == newValue (actually, they aren't even for oldValue.equals(newValue)) - if they are in your context, something fishy might go on – kleopatra Feb 4 '15 at 11:53
  • @kleopatra I didn't know about that constraint... I'll fix the code accordingly – fge Feb 4 '15 at 13:20
  • actually, you can't because 1. leafProperty is only privately mutable 2. TreeItem privately mutates it on receiving changes from the children list - It's a missing piece in TreeItem api, hot needle design by oversimplification (Note to self: go ahead and file a bug report ;-) – kleopatra Feb 4 '15 at 13:34
  • They should have made leafProperty() non-final and isLeaf() final, instead of the other way around... too late now to fix it. I guess the best they can do is make both non-final. – James_D Feb 5 '15 at 12:51
  • @James_D wouldn't really help in itself, due to bullet 2 (the property is private and is privately mutated in the base class) To me it looks like they didn't really think about the "semantic" leafness at the start (requires an additional property allowsChildren) and tried to rescue by the non final accessor (which is incorrectly implemented in their example in the api doc). And indeed, nasty to fix in hind-sight: leaf's setter must be protected and leaf's internal update in the change listener extracted into a protected method. – kleopatra Feb 5 '15 at 13:12

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