207

I'm starting with NodeJS and Express 4, and I'm a bit confused. I been reading the express website, but can't see _when to use a route handler or when to use express.Router.

As I could see, if I want to show a page or something when the user hits /show for example I should use:

var express = require('express')    
var app = express()    
app.get("/show", someFunction)  

At the beginning, I thought this was old, for express3, is that right or this is the way for express4 too?

If this is the way to do it in express4, what is express.Router used for?

I read almost the same example as above but using express.Router:

var express = require('express');
var router = express.Router();
router.get("/show", someFunction)

So, what's the difference between both examples?

Which one should I use if I just want to do a simple testing website?

  • 18
    A Router doesn't .listen() for requests on its own. It's useful for separating your application into multiple modules -- creating a Router in each that the app can require() and .use() as middleware. – Jonathan Lonowski Feb 3 '15 at 17:33
  • 4
    As @JonathanLonowski hinted at, the app.get(..) syntax is just a shortcut to make working with express.router more convenient. If you're just starting out, don't worry about the specifics of the router. – soulprovidr Feb 3 '15 at 17:33
  • 1
    so you are saying that I should use for the moment only app.get()? still confused about when to use one or another – nelson687 Feb 3 '15 at 17:37
  • 9
    @nelson687 There isn't really a hard-set rule between them. If you feel the app's own routing methods, such as app.get(), are sufficient for your needs, use them. The Router is just there for convenience to help you organize the application across multiple modules. From the guide: "The express.Router class can be used to create modular mountable route handlers. A Router instance is a complete middleware and routing system; for this reason it is often referred to as a "mini-app"." – Jonathan Lonowski Feb 3 '15 at 18:02
  • 3
264

app.js

var express = require('express'),
    dogs    = require('./routes/dogs'),
    cats    = require('./routes/cats'),
    birds   = require('./routes/birds');

var app = express();

app.use('/dogs',  dogs);
app.use('/cats',  cats);
app.use('/birds', birds);

app.listen(3000);

dogs.js

var express = require('express');

var router = express.Router();

router.get('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('GET handler for /dogs route.');
});

router.post('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('POST handler for /dogs route.');
});

module.exports = router;

When var app = express() is called, an app object is returned. Think of this as the main app.

When var router = express.Router() is called, a slightly different mini app is returned. The idea behind the mini app is that each route in your app can become quite complicated, and you'd benefit from moving all that code into a separate file. Each file's router becomes a mini app, which has a very similar structure to the main app.

In the example above, the code for the /dogs route has been moved into its own file so it doesn't clutter up the main app. The code for /cats and /birds would be structured similarly in their own files. By separating this code into three mini apps, you can work on the logic for each one in isolation, and not worry about how it will affect the other two.

If you have code (middleware) that pertains to all three routes, you can put it in the main app, before the app.use(...) calls. If you have code (middleware) that pertains to just one of those routes, you can put it in the file for that route only.

  • shouldn't you have to pass the app object on app.use('/dogs', dogs)(app) since you're defining routes there, additionally (and correct me if i'm wrong) if you do it this way the app object has all of the middle-ware previously placed on it and additional middle-ware will be added to the app object (assuming more middle-ware is in the dogs route). if you use route.get('/dogs', route) it only passes the middle-ware to the app object when interacting with the routes defined in that router and if the scope of app is outside of route it doesn't have access to that middle-ware. – Ravenous Oct 21 '15 at 14:43
  • You don't need to pass the app to the route, because the route is being passed to the app with app.use('/dogs', show). This way the route is independent of the app, and can be reused in any Express app. Middleware placed anywhere before a route gets used by that route. If you place middleware above all routes in app.js, then all the routes will use that middleware. If you place middleware inside a route file (dogs.js), only that route will use it. If you place middleware after the GET route inside dogs.js, then only the POST route will use it (as long as it ends with a response). – Nocturno Oct 21 '15 at 17:14
  • Ahh my bad. I meant to put app.get('/dogs'dogs,)(app) since the question was about the get feature of app.get and route.get. you were showing how to separate the routes to make them manageable. But wouldn't my anacdote be correct if we're talking about app.get ? If I can get on a PC I'll edit my above comment. – Ravenous Oct 21 '15 at 19:29
  • 2
    My App still works when I use either express.Router() or express(), I couldn't understand the difference :( – Ajay Suwalka Jan 31 '16 at 17:51
  • 3
    @Ajay Suwalka I don't know how I can elaborate any more on what I've already said. The docs say "A router object is an isolated instance of middleware and routes". I also like @Jonathan Lonowski comment above, "A Router doesn't .listen() for requests on its own". That might be the main difference. – Nocturno Jan 31 '16 at 19:36
19

Express 4.0 comes with the new Router. As mentioned on the site:

The express.Router class can be used to create modular mountable route handlers. A Router instance is a complete middleware and routing system; for this reason it is often referred to as a “mini-app”.

There is a good article at https://scotch.io/tutorials/learn-to-use-the-new-router-in-expressjs-4 which describes the differences and what can be done with routers.

To summarize

With routers you can modularize your code more easily. You can use routers as:

  1. Basic Routes: Home, About
  2. Route Middleware to log requests to the console
  3. Route with Parameters
  4. Route Middleware for Parameters to validate specific parameters
  5. Validates a parameter passed to a certain route

Note:

The app.router object, which was removed in Express 4, has made a comeback in Express 5. In the new version, it is a just a reference to the base Express router, unlike in Express 3, where an app had to explicitly load it.

4
app.route('/book')
  .get(function (req, res) {
    res.send('Get a random book')
  })
  .post(function (req, res) {
    res.send('Post a random book')
  })

As in above example, we can add different HTTP request method under a route.

3

Let’s say your application is little complex. So what we do first is we divide the application into multiple modules so that changes in one module doesn't clutter the others and you can keep working on individual modules, but at the end of the day you need to integrate everything into one since you are building a single application. It is like we have one main application and few child applications whose parent is the main application. So when we create the parent application we create one using

var express = require('express');
var parent = express();

And to this parent application we need to bring in the child applications. But since the child applications are not totally different applications(since they run in the same context-java term), express provides the way to do it by means on the Expresse's Router function and this is what we do in the each child module file and lets call one such child module as aboutme.

var express = require('express');
var router = express.Router();
/**
** do something here
**/
module.exports = router;

By module.exports we are making this module available for other to consume and since we have modularized things we need to make the module files available to the parent application by means of node's require function just like any other third party modules and the parent file looks something like this.

var express = require('express') 
var parent = express() 
var child = require(./aboutme)

after we make this child module available to the parent we need to tell the parent application when to use this child application. Lets say when a user hits the path aboutme we need the child application about me to handle the request and we do it by using the Expresse's use method.

parent.use('/aboutme',  aboutme);

and in one shot the parent file looks like this

var express = require('express');
var parent = express();
var child = require(./aboutme);
/***
**do some stuff here
**/
parent.use('/aboutme',child);

Above all what the parent can do is it can start a server where as the child cannot. Hope this clarifies. For more information you can always look at the source code which takes some time but it gives you a lot of information. Thank you.

  • shouldn't this be parent.use('/aboutme', child)? – Kees de Kooter Jun 17 at 9:59
  • Yeah thanks for correcting it. – raj240 Jun 22 at 5:08
1

using app.js to write routes means that they are accessible to all the users as app.js is loaded on application start. However, putting routes in express.router() mini apps protect and restrict their accessibility.

1

express.Router has a lot of options:

  • Enable Case sensitivity. /show route not the same /Show, But be default is diabled
  • strict routing mode. that /show/ not the same /show and also is disabled by default
  • You can add specific middleware for specific routes.
0

In a word , express.Routercan do more things when compares to app.get(),such as middleware, moreover, you can define one more router object with express.Router()

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