I recently implemented some code similar to below and submitted a pull request to get it added to our shared repository. The request was rejected and I was told this pattern was bad. Instead I should be putting my dependencies closer to the creation of my objects. If the parent object creates a child object then a Func childFactory should be passed in rather than a more generic object since that could be misused, increases coupling and becomes much harder to test.

public interface ILogResolverService
{
    ILogger<T> Resolve<T>();
}

public class LogResolverService : ILogResolverService
{
    private readonly IContainer _container;

    public LogResolverService(IContainer container)
    {
        _container = container;
    }

    public ILogger<T> Resolve<T>()
    {
        return _container.Resolve<ILogger<T>>();
    }
}

The idea of the code is to pass an object that can create an ILogger so that you can log with the correct class name. If you create a child view model for example you would let it create it's own ILogger etc

Since this issue has polarized opinions amoungst my colleagues I wanted to get an opinion from the community.

Added After Comments

I should have added that I don't see this as a ServiceLocator pattern because it is a strongly typed interface passed into the constructor of a parent. So you know all your dependencies up front. The worse that can happen is a new method is added to the interface ILogResolverService. Unless I'm missing something.

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    looks like it's going on the direction of service locator, which would be pretty hard to unit test. Why not use the property injection to inject ILogger<T> ? – Low Flying Pelican Feb 4 '15 at 11:19
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    The problem is you don't know what T is when a child object is new'd up by its parent. The parent knows this and perhaps it only knows it at runtime also. – user630190 Feb 4 '15 at 12:01
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    This in fact IS an application of the Service Locator anti-pattern. Please read this and this. – Steven Feb 5 '15 at 9:19
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    You can't tell if the code might fail at runtime because there's no registered logger for T in the container. – plalx Feb 9 '15 at 22:02
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    Hi Steven, I've read both those articles and still don't consider this a service locator. Can you expand on why you think it is? My reasoning is ILogResolverService only returns ILoggers, it doesn't allow arbitrary access to the container. Hence all dependencies are known, easily mocked etc – user630190 Feb 10 '15 at 19:41

For what I can tell with the design you've outlined above, the main issue here is with your service being somewhat container aware.

Even if the return values you're proving are strongly typed and unambiguous the tricky part is somewhere else. The domain knowledge is too broad and overlap the container job.

It's always a good practice to explicitly provide the dependency your builder is using via an Add method.

public AddLoggerService[...]

Depending of your context you can ask the container to decorate/compile such service by adding all the needed dependency runtime.

Hope i have shed some light on the matter,

Regards.

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