Can any one describe the exact difference between loose coupling and tight coupling in Object oriented paradigm?

15 Answers 15

up vote 262 down vote accepted

Tight coupling is when a group of classes are highly dependent on one another.

This scenario arises when a class assumes too many responsibilities, or when one concern is spread over many classes rather than having its own class.

Loose coupling is achieved by means of a design that promotes single-responsibility and separation of concerns.

A loosely-coupled class can be consumed and tested independently of other (concrete) classes.

Interfaces are a powerful tool to use for decoupling. Classes can communicate through interfaces rather than other concrete classes, and any class can be on the other end of that communication simply by implementing the interface.

Example of tight coupling:

class CustomerRepository
{
    private readonly Database database;

    public CustomerRepository(Database database)
    {
        this.database = database;
    }

    public void Add(string CustomerName)
    {
        database.AddRow("Customer", CustomerName);
    }
}

class Database
{
    public void AddRow(string Table, string Value)
    {
    }
}

Example of loose coupling:

class CustomerRepository
{
    private readonly IDatabase database;

    public CustomerRepository(IDatabase database)
    {
        this.database = database;
    }

    public void Add(string CustomerName)
    {
        database.AddRow("Customer", CustomerName);
    }
}

interface IDatabase
{
    void AddRow(string Table, string Value);
}

class Database : IDatabase
{
    public void AddRow(string Table, string Value)
    {
    }
}

Another example here.

  • So far what you said makes perfect sense.. Can you please explain how coupling mechanism can relate to Observer pattern? – Jim May 14 '10 at 5:46
  • 1
    The observer pattern is described here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_pattern. Since the Subject class can maintain a list of classes that inherit from 'Observer', without actually knowing the concrete type of those classes, this is an instance of loose coupling. The Subject doesn't depend on any of its Observers or their internal concerns. The observers don't depend on the Subject or any of its concerns. – Jonathan May 14 '10 at 6:02
  • 2
    Java interfaces are tools that can aid this. However they are not required. The concept of program to the interface not the implementation means program to the public methods/attributes (or ones that are meant to be used by external callers when languages don't support access modifiers, like C). The interface is supposed to honour this implied contract by not changing. In languages without access modifiers (like C), it means only using published interfaces/functions and not hitting those that are meant to be used internally, since those may change as needed to support the published functions. – Bill Rosmus Apr 14 '16 at 23:19
  • 2
    @jonathanconway thank you sir but both pieces of code do the same thing: what then is the difference between them? i.e. what advantages are there to loosely coupling? – BKSpurgeon Jun 19 '16 at 9:37
  • I've seen (basically) this example before. In my opinion wouldn't that only matter if there were many types of databases that were going to be used. If you plan to have only one, then is it that bad to use an implementation directly, then later if you are going to need to inject different types, then refactor the single use of Database to use an interface? Rather than adding loads of boiler plate code which is likely not needed? – Carlos Bribiescas Aug 8 '17 at 14:26

Explanation of the concept without code

Summary Example:

The Hat is "loosely coupled" to the body. This means you can easily take the hat off without making any changes to the person/body. When you can do that then you have "loose coupling". See below for elaboration.

The Hat is "loosely coupled" to the body. This means you can easily take then hat off without making any changes to the the person/body. Picture Attribution: https://pixabay.com/en/greeting-cylinder-chapeau-dignity-317250/

Tight coupling (Detailed Example)

Think of your skin. It's stuck to your body. It fits like a glove. But what if you wanted to change your skin colour from say white to black? Can you imagine just how painful it would be to peel off your skin, dye it, and then to paste it back on etc? Changing your skin is difficult because it is tightly coupled to your body. You just can't make changes easily. You would have to fundamentally redesign a human being in order to make this possible.

  • Key Point #1: In other words, if you want to change the skin, you would also HAVE TO change the design of your body as well because the two are joined together - they are tightly coupled.

God was not a good object oriented programmer.

Loose coupling (Detailed Example)

Now think of getting dressed in the morning. You don't like blue? No problems: you can put a red shirt on instead. You can do this easily and effortlessly because the shirt is not really connected to your body the same way as your skin. The shirt doesn't know or care about what body it is going on. In other words, you can change your clothes, without really changing your body.

  • That's key point #2. If you change your shirt, then you are not forced to change your body - when you can do that, then you have loose coupling. When you can't do that, then you have tight coupling.

That's the basic concept in a nutshell.

Why is all of this important?

It's important because software changes all the time. Generally speaking you want to be able to easily modify your code.

e.g. Practical Examples

  • If somebody wants their output in a CSV file rather than JSON etc., or if you want to switch from MySQL to PostGreSQL you should be able to make those changes extremely easily in your code, without having to rewrite the entire class and spending 10 hours debugging.
  • If somebody wants their car in black, you shouldn't have to redesign the entire car in order to do that. A car and its spare parts would be a perfect example of a loosely coupled architecture (as per @mnmopazem's comments)

Summary

In short, loose coupling makes code easier to change. The answers above provide some code which is worth reading at this point.

Picture Attribution.

  • 1
    this is such a underrated explanation for new programmers. Tough to go through the big words some others our putting out, once you understand the basics then its easier to go to the big words lol – user2763557 Jul 12 at 20:25
  • There are some things which must be tightly coupled and some loosely coupled to its environment. The use of skin is not a proper analogy for tight coupling. If skin is thought as tightly coupled with the body, so is every other part. The body(as a whole) has to have parts(tightly integrated) to function properly(may be as thought of by the nature - a brilliant architect). If those parts were designed to be replaceable(as simple as changing a hat) then, the very meaning of 'human' body looses its definition. Comment 1/2. – mnmopazem Aug 11 at 5:08
  • Going by the example, if skin is made to be replaceable, then head also must be replaceable to anew. If that happens, then people might not be recognizable from one meet to another. A good tight/loose coupling analogy would be - a car and its parts, a computer and its parts etc... If there's a problem with mouse/keyboard of a computer, it can be replaced with another part rather than make whole computer useless and throw away. Comment 2/2. – mnmopazem Aug 11 at 5:08
  • @mnmopazem you are 100% correct. that means you understand perfectly the difference between loose/tight coupling. car parts would be a better analogy - i have updated the answer to reflect your comments/feedback – BKSpurgeon Aug 11 at 5:25

In object oriented design, the amount of coupling refers to how much the design of one class depends on the design of another class. In other words, how often do changes in class A force related changes in class B? Tight coupling means the two classes often change together, loose coupling means they are mostly independent. In general, loose coupling is recommended because it's easier to test and maintain.

You may find this paper by Martin Fowler (PDF) helpful.

  • "how often do changes in class A force related changes in class B?" I need a brief example for the above sentence?? – Kumaresan Perumal Sep 20 '17 at 8:35

Program wise Differance between Tight Coupling and Loose Coupling ?

Tight Coupling Between Java Objects

class Traveler
{
    Car c=new Car();
    void startJourney()
    {
       c.move();
    }
}

class Car
{
  void move()
  {
     // logic...
  }
}

Loose Coupling Between Java Objects

class Traveler
{
    Vehicle v;
    public void setV(Vehicle v)
    {
      this.v = v;
    }      

    void startJourney()
    {
       v.move();
    }
}

//=========================Interface====================================

 Interface Vehicle
    {
       void move();
    }

//====================Multiple class implement vehicle interface. First class====

class Car implements Vehicle
{
    public void move()
    {
         // logic
    }
}

//===================Second class================

class Bike implements Vehicle
{
    public void move()
    {
         // logic
    }
}
  • Good answer, but a little comment on why one is better than the other would get your more points. – ojonugwa ochalifu Nov 13 '17 at 10:02

In general Tight Coupling is bad in but most of the time, because it reduces flexibility and re-usability of code, it makes changes much more difficult, it impedes testability etc.

Tightly Coupled Object is an object need to know quite a bit about each other and are usually highly dependent on each other interfaces. Changing one object in a tightly coupled application often requires changes to a number of other objects, In small application we can easily identify the changes and there is less chance to miss anything. But in large applications these inter-dependencies are not always known by every programmer or chance is there to miss changes. But each set of loosely coupled objects are not dependent on others.

In short we can say, loose coupling is a design goal that seeks to reduce the interdependencies between components of a system with the goal of reducing the risk that changes in one component will require changes in any other component. Loose coupling is a much more generic concept intended to increase the flexibility of a system, make it more maintainable, and make the entire framework more 'stable'.

Coupling refers to the degree of direct knowledge that one element has of another. we can say an eg: A and B, only B change its behavior only when A change its behavior. A loosely coupled system can be easily broken down into definable elements.

When two objects are loosely coupled, they can interact but have very little knowledge of each other.

Loosely coupled designs allow us to build flexible OO systems that can handle change.

Observer design pattern is a good example for making classes loosely coupled, you can have a look on it in Wikipedia.

The way I understand it is, that tightly coupled architecture does not provide a lot of flexibility for change when compared to loosely coupled architecture.

But in case of loosely coupled architectures, message formats or operating platforms or revamping the business logic does not impact the other end. If the system is taken down for a revamp, of course the other end will not be able to access the service for a while but other than that, the unchanged end can resume message exchange as it was before the revamp.

An extract from my blog post on coupling:

What is Tight Coupling:-

As par above definition a Tightly Coupled Object is an object that needs to know about other objects and are usually highly dependent on each other's interfaces.

When we change one object in a tightly coupled application often it requires changes to a number of other objects. There is no problem in a small application we can easily identify the change. But in the case of a large applications these inter-dependencies are not always known by every consumer or other developers or there is many chance of future changes.

Let’s take a shopping cart demo code to understand the tight coupling:

namespace DNSLooseCoupling
{
    public class ShoppingCart
    {
        public float Price;
        public int Quantity;

        public float GetRowItemTotal()
        {
            return Price * Quantity;
        }
    }

    public class ShoppingCartContents
    {
        public ShoppingCart[] items;

        public float GetCartItemsTotal()
        {
            float cartTotal = 0;
            foreach (ShoppingCart item in items)
            {
                cartTotal += item.GetRowItemTotal();
            }
            return cartTotal;
        }
    }

    public class Order
    {
        private ShoppingCartContents cart;
        private float salesTax;

        public Order(ShoppingCartContents cart, float salesTax)
        {
            this.cart = cart;
            this.salesTax = salesTax;
        }

        public float OrderTotal()
        {
            return cart.GetCartItemsTotal() * (2.0f + salesTax);
        }
    }
}

Problems with the above example

Tight Coupling creates some difficulties.

Here, OrderTotal() methods is give us complete amount for the current items of the carts. If we want to add the discount features in this cart system. It is very hard to do in above code because we have to make changes at every class as it is very tightly coupled.

There are certain tools that provide dependency injection through their library, for example in .net we have ninject Library .

If you are going further in java then spring provides this capabilities.

Loosly coupled objects can be made by introducing Interfaces in your code, thats what these sources do.

Say in your code you are writing

Myclass m = new Myclass();

now this statement in your method says that you are dependent on myclass this is called a tightly coupled. Now you provide some constructor injection , or property injection and instantiating object then it will become loosly coupled.

Loose coupling it means degree of dependency between two components is very Low Ex.GSM SIM Tight coupling it means degree of dependency between two components is very High. ex. CDMA Mobile

Loose coupling is and answer to to old style hardcoded dependencies and related issues issues like frequent recompilation when anything changes and code reuse. It stresses on implementing the worker logic in components and avoiding solution specific wire up code there.

Loose Coupling = IoC See this for easier explanation.

  • 2
    I don't think loose coupling is the same as inversion of control. Inversion of control is a very useful technique for reducing the coupling of your design, but there are many other techniques. – Don Kirkby May 14 '10 at 17:24

Loose Coupling is the process of giving the dependency your class needs indirectly without providing all the information of the dependency(i.e in the from of interface) in case tight coupling you directly give in the dependency which is not good way of coding.

It's about classes dependency rate to another ones which is so low in loosely coupled and so high in tightly coupled. To be clear in the service orientation architecture, services are loosely coupled to each other against monolithic which classes dependency to each other is on purpose

Tight Coupling means one class is dependent on another class. Loose Coupling means one class is dependent on interface rathar than class.

In Tight coupling, there are hardcoded dependency declared in methods. In Loose coupling, we must pass dependency externally at runtime instead of hardcoded.(Loose couple systems are use interface for decrease dependency with class)

For Example, We have a system that can send output in two or more ways like JSON-Output, CSV-Output etc.

Tight Coupled

public interface OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput();
}

public class CSVOutputGenerator implements OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput() {
        System.out.println("CSV Output Generator");
    }
}

public class JSONOutputGenerator implements OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput() {
        System.out.println("JSON Output Generator");
    }
}

// In Other Code, we write Output Generator like...
public class Class1 {
    public void generateOutput() {
        // Here Output will be in CSV-Format, because of hard-coded code.
        // This method tightly coupled with CSVOutputGenerator class, if we want another Output, we must change this method.
        // Any method, that calls Class1's generateOutput will return CSVOutput, because Class1 is tight couple with CSVOutputGenerator.
        OutputGenerator outputGenerator = new CSVOutputGenerator();
        output.generateOutput();
    }
}

In above example, If we want to change output in JSON, then we need to find and change in whole code, because Class1 is tightly cloupled with CSVOutputGenerator class.

Loose Coupled

public interface OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput();
}

public class CSVOutputGenerator implements OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput() {
        System.out.println("CSV Output Generator");
    }
}

public class JSONOutputGenerator implements OutputGenerator {
    public void generateOutput() {
        System.out.println("JSON Output Generator");
    }
}

// In Other Code, we write Output Generator like...
public class Class1 {
    public void generateOutput(OutputGenerator outputGenerator) {
        // if you want to write JSON, pass object of JSONOutputGenerator (Dependency will be passed externally to this method)
        // if you want to write CSV, pass object of CSVOutputGenerator (Dependency will be passed externally to this method)

        // Due to loose couple with class, we don't need to change code of Class1, because Class1 is loose coupled with CSVOutputGenerator or JSONOutputGenerator class
        // Any method, that calls Class1's generateOutput will desired output, because Class1 does not tight couple with CSVOutputGenerator or JSONOutputGenerator class
        OutputGenerator outputGenerator = outputGenerator;
        output.generateOutput();
    }
}

If an object's creation/existence dependents on another object which can't be tailored, its tight coupling. And, if the dependency can be tailored, its loose coupling. Consider an example in Java:

class Car {

    private Engine engine = new Engine( "X_COMPANY" ); // this car is being created with "X_COMPANY" engine
    // Other parts

    public Car() { 
        // implemenation 
    }

}

The client of Car class can create one with ONLY "X_COMPANY" engine.

Consider breaking this coupling with ability to change that:

class Car {

    private Engine engine;
    // Other members

    public Car( Engine engine ) { // this car can be created with any Engine type
        this.engine = engine;
    }

}

Now, a Car is not dependent on an engine of "X_COMPANY" as it can be created with types.

A Java specific note: using Java interfaces just for de-coupling sake is not a proper desing approach. In Java, an interface has a purpose - to act as a contract which intrisically provides de-coupling behavior/advantage.

Bill Rosmus's comment in accepted answer has a good explanation.

protected by eyllanesc Aug 11 at 7:17

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