2

I want to bound type T for both types Integer and string:

interface

type
  MyFactory<T> = class
  public
    function createGenerator<T:Integer,string>:IGenerator<T>;
  end;

But the compiler gives: '(..) E2510 Type 'Integer' is not a valid constraint'. How can I restrict type T to be a Integer or string? Or is this a problem because I am using ordinal types?

1 Answer 1

9

Delphi generics do not support ordinal or string type constraints.

Only allowed constraints are

  • Zero, one, or multiple interface types
  • Zero or one class type
  • The reserved word "constructor", "class", or "record"

Delphi Constraints in Generics

I can only guess what exactly you are trying to accomplish but following code may give you some ideas

  IGenerator<T> = interface
    function Generate: T;
  end;

  TStringGenerator = class(TInterfacedObject, IGenerator<string>)
  public
    function Generate: string;
  end;

  TIntegerGenerator = class(TInterfacedObject, IGenerator<integer>)
  public
    function Generate: integer;
  end;

  MyFactory<T> = class
  public
    class function createGenerator<T>: IGenerator<T>;
  end;

class function MyFactory<T>.createGenerator<T>: IGenerator<T>;
var
  gs: IGenerator<string>;
  gi: IGenerator<integer>;
begin
  if TypeInfo(T) = TypeInfo(string) then
    begin
      gs := TStringGenerator.Create;
      Result := IGenerator<T>(gs);
    end
  else
  if TypeInfo(T) = TypeInfo(integer) then
    begin
      gi := TIntegerGenerator.Create;
      Result := IGenerator<T>(gi);
    end
  else Result := nil;
end;

function TIntegerGenerator.Generate: integer;
begin
  Result := 10;
end;

function TStringGenerator.Generate: string;
begin
  Result := 'abc';
end;

var
  i: integer;
  s: string;

  i := MyFactory<integer>.createGenerator<integer>.generate;
  s := MyFactory<string>.createGenerator<string>.generate;

TTypeKind can also be used instead of TypeInfo for determining type. Main difference is that TypeInfo gives you exact type used, while TTypeKind covers all types that fall into certain category. While TTypeKind gives more flexibility, it should be used with caution if code depends on typecasts. For instance tkInteger covers both integer and byte types, and typecast can cause errors.

class function MyFactory<T>.createGenerator<T>: IGenerator<T>;
var
  gs: IGenerator<string>;
  gi: IGenerator<integer>;
begin
  case PTypeInfo(TypeInfo(T)).Kind of
    tkUString :
      begin
        gs := TStringGenerator.Create;
        Result := IGenerator<T>(gs);
      end;
    tkInteger :
      begin
        gi := TIntegerGenerator.Create;
        Result := IGenerator<T>(gi);
      end
    else Result := nil;
  end;
end;
6
  • @TLama That would be good. That would let the reader know that the answer has now been surpassed by the language. If we link to a specific version (and I edited because the original linked to XE6 rather than the current version which is XE7) then future readers miss the opportunity to discover such developments. Feb 4, 2015 at 15:25
  • GetTypeKind would be more appropriate here I think. Feb 4, 2015 at 15:58
  • @David depends on code. TypeInfo gives exact type and that is important for typecasting in my example. Feb 4, 2015 at 17:17
  • Maybe. I took ordinal to mean, well ordinal. But perhaps it means integer. Feb 4, 2015 at 17:34
  • 1
    Please don't call it 2-4 times, even if it doesn't have much overhead. You can use PTypeInfo(TypeInfo(T)).Kind in a case or assign it to a local variable of TTypeKind. Feb 4, 2015 at 17:50

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