5

When i was reviewing Builder pattern in Josh's Bloch book, i came up with simpler implementation, but i'm not sure whether it's proper. For example:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Numbers first = new Numbers.Builder().setD(3.14).build();
        System.out.println(first);
        Numbers second = new Numbers.Builder().setI(17).setF(1.24F).build();
        System.out.println(second);
        System.out.println(first);
    }
}

final class Numbers {
    private int i;
    private long l;
    private float f;
    private double d;

    private Numbers() {}


    public static class Builder {
        private final Numbers instance = new Numbers();

        public Builder setI(int i) {
            instance.i = i;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder setL(long l) {
            instance.l = l;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder setF(float f) {
            instance.f = f;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder setD(double d) {
            instance.d = d;
            return this;
        }

        public Numbers build() {
            return instance;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return String.format("%4d %4d %7.3f %7.3f", i, l, f, d);
    }
}

Is it can still be considered as a Builder pattern or i missed something?

EDIT

What about this?

//...

private Numbers() {}


private Numbers(Numbers o) {
        i = o.i;
        l = o.l;
        f = o.f;
        d = o.d;
    }

public static class Builder {
        private final Numbers instance = new Numbers();

          //...

        public Numbers build() {
            return new Numbers(instance);
        }
    }
3
  • 5
    One big problem with this approach is that if you call build() several times on the same builder, you end up with the same instance every time. – JB Nizet Feb 4 '15 at 21:50
  • @JB Nizet oh, right, Builder is public -_- ty – Dmytro Feb 4 '15 at 21:57
  • Create the Builder instance inside the build() method – user41871 Feb 4 '15 at 21:58
4

The problem with your code is that if you call build twice for the same Builder instance, you'll get the same Numbers instance. And if you call methods of the Builder after you called build and got the Numbers instance, you will change that instance. The instance created by the builder should be independent of the Builder once it's built.

8
  • 4
    The other problems with this are that it means none of your fields can be final, and your constructor can't perform any validation on the fields (maybe you want some logic that depends on multiple fields, like "if i == 3 then f can't be negative"). – yshavit Feb 4 '15 at 22:18
  • @yshavit so now(after edit) the disadvantage of this approach is that i cannot check invariants? – Dmytro Feb 4 '15 at 22:22
  • @DmytroD there is another problem: many times, the immutable object constructed by the builder doesn't have one field for every mutator of the builder. Imagine for example that a Numbers instance is made of two PairOfNumbers immutable instances. You generally want to have a distinction between the way the immutable instance stores its permanent state and the way the mutable builder stores its mutable state. – JB Nizet Feb 4 '15 at 22:33
  • 1
    No. What I'm saying is that if your Number class has two fields PairOfNumbers iAndL and PairOfNumbers fAndD you won't be able to store i in the Numbers instance when setI() is called, since Numbers doesn't have any field where i can be stored. – JB Nizet Feb 4 '15 at 22:51
  • 1
    Also three fact that your fields aren't final, which could have maintainability and multi-threading implications. – yshavit Feb 5 '15 at 2:23

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